Choctaw Nation Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma http://choctawnation.com/rss/ en-us 40 Environmentally Friendly Cleaner Draws from Family History <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3201/BIZMotherEarthPHOTO_original.JPG" alt='Mother Earth BIZ' /><br></p> <p><em>Michael Roberts, left, proprietor of MotherEarth Eco-Solutions, visits with Boyd Miller from the Choctaw Nation Preferred Supplier Program, after a presentation about Roberts’ product (shown in foreground).</em><br></p> <h3>Environmentally Friendly Cleaner Draws from Family History</h3> <p><strong>Durant, Okla.</strong> - Imagine a product that combines common sense, chemistry and culture as a solution to a very out-of-sight, out-of-mind problem.<br></p> <p>Michael Roberts has done so, taking a gift from a biochemist and turning it into MotherEarth Eco-Remediations. The microbes gifted to Roberts are a unique and, according to the developers, much safer way to combat commercial kitchen grease clogging drain pipes.<br></p> <p>That’s the out-of-sight part. While MotherEarth does have more visible products such as a kitchen cleaner, the main attraction is a safe, non-abrasive liquid that eats up grease and clears expensive plumbing systems of potentially costly clogs.<br></p> <p>Cue the common sense: Roberts presented his product to the Choctaw Nation Preferred Supplier program in April. Choctaw Casinos, as well as others in the region, have been using MotherEarth for a few years since it is a native-owned company (Roberts and his business partner and wife, Rebecca, are both Native Americans).<br></p> <p>“There is a lot of stuff that goes down the drain” at commercial kitchens, Roberts said. “One problem kitchens will have is buildup and back-up from so much grease going down the lines.”<br></p> <p>The problem with popular brands is dependence upon caustic chemicals to break down grease. These chemicals create as many problems as they solve: They get into the wastewater chain (a gateway to the environment and downstream water supplies), and the toxic compounds can eat away at pipes.<br></p> <p>The contrast is easier illustrated like this: The warnings on a bottle of big-name pipe degreaser are numerous, and shocking. There are no such warnings on a bottle of MotherEarth. “If you were to drink it, it wouldn’t kill you,” Roberts said. <br></p> <p>Now, the chemistry: Roberts met a biochemist who had developed bacterial microbes that consume greasy build-ups, rather than chemically breaking them down with the help of enzymes. The enzyme process is so invasive that many places simply foot the bill for expensive pumping services. City and state regulators place limits on restaurants’ release of bio-oxygen demands and “total suspended solids” on either end of the process.<br></p> <p>“Our product actually takes care of those things,” Roberts said. “We’re trying to eliminate pump-outs. We’re trying to save the environment and save facilities a huge amount in fines and surcharges.”<br></p> <p>So how did Roberts come up with this bacteria-based solution? That’s where culture comes into play.<br></p> <p>Roberts lives in Ada and is a fancy-dancer - a 19-time world champion one at that. He is Choctaw and Chickasaw. His pastime is attending pow wows and festivals throughout the land to show off his moves and regalia. He has assisted in organizing the annual Choctaw Nation Pow Wow set for December this year.<br></p> <p>The MotherEarthEco.com website has a quote from Roberts’ father, Hiloha Okcheemali (Blue Thunder): “There was a time… I could drink water with the animals.” Roberts intends to do his part to restore that level of purity to the world.<br></p> <p>In his father’s youth, he was part of a traditional deer hunt with the Meskwaki (Sac &amp; Fox) Nation in Iowa. He related to his son that they took a deer but “the blood stunk and the meat stunk. The (deer) were drinking polluted water,” he said.<br></p> <p>“That’s when we realized, something was going on with the environment, and something needs to be done,” he said.<br></p> <p>Fast-forward several years to one of Roberts’ fancy-dance competitions. At one of them, he met the biochemist, who revealed his Irish roots.<br></p> <p>“I said, ‘Have you ever heard the story about how the Choctaws helped during the Irish potato famine?’ After I told him the story, he wanted to do something to show his appreciation. He wanted to give back,” Roberts said.<br></p> <p>The microbial compound in Mother Earth was that gift. Roberts saw an opportunity to take action to help the environment. Since developing the product line, he has worked with several Oklahoma tribes as well as Fortune 500 companies like Frito-Lay.<br></p> <p>He hopes his example will inspire other big corporations to look at ways they can impact the world positively.<br></p> <p>“If they see Native Americans caring for the environment, maybe they too will change,” he said. “I’m not looking to be a multi-millionaire. I’m looking to change the environment.”<br></p> <p>One way, of course, is to use the safer microbial pipe cleanser that Roberts has developed. He says other formulas use a fractional amount of microbes, while his product claims a staggering 1 trillion per gallon. He also offers a hydronium-based product for eliminating rust, lime-scale and calcium build-up.<br></p> <p>The product is disseminated through a mechanical system attached beneath three-pot sinks in industrial kitchens. The components come from suppliers on the east and west coasts, while the product itself is crafted in Ada. Roberts has contractors who provide service calls to their growing list of clients.<br></p> <p>Roberts and his line of MotherEarth Eco-Remediation products were put through the “shark tank” process of the Preferred Supplier Program, including people from Franchising, Facilities Maintenance and Business Development at Choctaw Nation, as well as Chickasaw Nation Division of Commerce. Panel participants were impressed with the product, but they wanted Roberts to improve his marketing to expand the product’s reach.<br></p> <p>“This process is not just to create an Indian-owned business,” said Boyd Miller, director of the Preferred Supplier Program. “It’s to make sure that business can successfully take on its chosen project.”<br></p> <p>Through the various resources available to small businesses started by Choctaw Nation members, ideas like Roberts’ MotherEarth products can reach their full potential. In this case, the potential is not only in financial rewards—but rewarding for us all with a small step toward a better Earth.<br></p> <p>For more information about these products, visit <a href="http://www.mothereathco.com">www.mothereartheco.com</a>.<Br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Fri, 28 Aug 2015 15:39:07 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/environmentally-friendly-cleaner-draws-from-family-history/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/environmentally-friendly-cleaner-draws-from-family-history/ Spotlight on Elders with Stella Long <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3198/ELDER_StellaLong_original.jpg" width="300" alt='Stella Long Elder' /><br> <em>Stella tells the story of the Trail of Tears at an Oklahoma City University pow wow.</em><Br></p> <h3>Spotlight on Elders with Stella Long</h3> <p><em>By Ronni Pierce</em><br> <em>Choctaw Nation</em><br></p> <p><strong>Oklahoma City, Okla.</strong> - Let’s start with her Choctaw name, Fichik. The word for “star” in the Choctaw language. Appropriate, since Stella Long emodies all the characteristics of a star: a celestial body that generates light and other radiant energy. A long time storyteller, Stella carries on the tradition of Native storytelling, creating a web of stories connecting our present to our past and introducing the stories of our ancestors to our children.<br></p> <p>She was born in the Choctaw Nation in eastern Oklahoma near a small community called Kanema. <br></p> <p>“They called it Kanema but in Choctaw it’s Kanima, which means somewhere in Choctaw,” she said. “So I had a lot of fun with that word when I was a little girl. People would ask me where I was born and I would answer ‘Somewhere,’ of course.”<br></p> <p>She attended grade school for a short time in Kanema. Then her family moved to Chilocco Indian School, an agricultural school for Native Americans in Newkirk. It closed permanently in 1980.<br></p> <p>“When my father was living we went to Chilocco. We were living at Chilocco Indian School because my father and my mother had met and married there.<br></p> <p>“After that, we moved back near Stigler and there was a lot of hardship there. We lived off the land and my brothers chopped wood to sell.”<br></p> <p>After her father died when she was 10, she was separated from her brothers and sent to Goodland Indian Orphanage, southeast of Hugo. She didn’t see them again for a very long time.<br></p> <p>Her life was lived at the orphanage from 7th grade until she was a senior in high school. But she did get to go home every year for Christmas.<br></p> <p>“My mother later married and had three children, one died and two are still living.” <br></p> <p>Before her father died and her world was turned upside down, she would wander the woods around her home. And that’s where she learned she had an innate connection to nature and to the animals that lived around her. She said she came to realize that the spirits of our ancestors speak to us through the animals.<br></p> <p>“I loved going up into the mountains, up into the rocks and I would see many birds, many types of birds. I saw flying squirrels jumping through the trees. I met a wolf there one time. He was up on the ridge looking back at me, and he walked forward for a little while still looking at me with piercing eyes. And because I respected animals I got down on my knees.<br></p> <p>“This was a great king wolf that we Indian people respected. And I talked to the animal and he slowly went up the hill. He turned back around to look at me but I didn’t follow him. And I thought to myself, ‘He probably thought that little girl has a lot to learn.’”<br></p> <p>Even with all the other animals she’s encountered, she still thinks of the wolf as her spirit animal.<br></p> <p>“Three medicine men have told me I was part of a wolf clan after I told them I did not know what clan I belonged to,” she says. “Among the Choctaws, there are not many animal clans that are heard of. You see, the Choctaws became what you might call civilized long before the other tribes did because the Choctaws wanted the education the white people seemed to be getting.” Stella thinks that may be when we started losing our connection to nature.<Br></p> <p>In order to acclimate to the white man’s way of thinking “we had to change a lot of things, a lot of the ways we behaved when we lived off the land.”<br></p> <p>“In fact,” she remembers, “I read in history books the first clothing we ever had was all leather, deer leather. And it had only one strap down toward the waistline with one breast showing. With leathers hanging down as a skirt.”<br></p> <p>She still goes to Indian doctors, as well, claiming she’s learned quite a bit from them.<br></p> <p>“I’ve been to a Cherokee medicine man. There are a number of John Ross family members who are in medicine. And he was a part of that family. He lives in Vian near a stomp ground, by the Dwight Mission in a log cabin.” <br></p> <p>During one of her visits she said, “He placed me on a cot but he did not touch me. Soon I felt a warmth moving over my leg even though nothing was touching me. <br></p> <p>‘I’m going to baptize you in the old way, he said. This is a special water.’ So, she explained, he dipped water from a little washpan then he stood behind her and trickled the water over her head. <br></p> <p>“Even though there was a cold wind outside,” she said “all I felt was a comfortable warmth.”<br></p> <p>She also visited an elderly Kiowa medicine man who helped her with a vision.<Br></p> <p>“There was a hurricane that had moved through the east. So I was worried about my children who I had not heard from.”<br></p> <p>According to Stella, “He called out to the ancestors. It was dark in the cabin. He started playing the flute and singing in his language. Suddenly a bright light, red bright lights, then balls of red light started flying around him.”<Br></p> <p>Then she said he announced the presence of the ancestors.<br></p> <p>“I looked around, smiled, and welcomed them,” she said. The medicine man told her the eagle that had accompanied the ancestors told them her children were safe. Then she said she felt peace because she knew they were OK.<br></p> <p>Stella continues to represent the Nation in the most favorable light. She’ll be telling her stories of animals and ancestors during Choctaw Days at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. October 2 and 3.<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Wed, 26 Aug 2015 18:12:12 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/spotlight-on-elders-with-stella-long/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/spotlight-on-elders-with-stella-long/ Mayos Lay Strong Foundation for Home Building Business <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3197/StonehengeHomes_CoupleBustShot_original.jpg" alt='Stonehenge Homes Couple' /><br> <em>Darrell and Angela Mayo stand at the foot of the staircase in the second home they built together, just outside of Durant. The two directly worked with every aspect of building the home, from laying out floor plans, to material selection, construction, painting, and decorating the space. With their enjoyment of home building, the Mayos founded a business which they hope to grow with the help of the Choctaw Nation.</em><br></p> <h3>Mayos Lay Strong Foundation for Home Building Business</h3> <p><strong>Durant, Okla.</strong> - Stonehenge Homes—the Choctaw-led custom house construction and design business based in Durant and servicing southeastern Oklahoma—laid a strong foundation back when husband and wife Darrell and Angela Mayo met in church as teens. The Mayos developed a life together over time, raising three children, building two homes from the ground up, and launching two family businesses. <br></p> <p>With the experience Darrell received working at his father’s painting business, and Angela’s natural eye for style and design, homemaking and home building just seemed natural for the couple.<br></p> <p>It started when the two decided to build a home for their family just north of Durant, at Sandstone Place.<br></p> <p>“At the first house, we enjoyed building it,” Darrell said.<br></p> <p>“Everybody went on about it so much, we had several people in a row say we really ought to do that (for a living),” Angela said, finishing his thought.<Br></p> <p>Speaking on the choice to name the business Stonehenge Homes, Angela said, “We chose the name because we are all about making sure the foundation is right, and everything is structurally sound. It is a solid name, it is built to last.”<br></p> <p>For the past six months, the Mayos have received assistance and guidance from the Choctaw Nation’s Preferred Supplier Program and Business Development.<br></p> <p>The Preferred Supplier Program, led by Boyd Miller, works to bring business owners like the Mayos in contact with anyone needing their services. Business Development works to help them grow their business the best way possible.<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Wed, 26 Aug 2015 15:12:30 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/mayos-lay-strong-foundation-for-home-building-business/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/mayos-lay-strong-foundation-for-home-building-business/ Wilson on Capital One Academic All-America Second Team <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3194/KaylaWilsonCOLOR_original.jpg" alt='Kayla Wilson' /><br> <em>Kayla Wilson team photo, left, and in action at a long jump competition, on the right.</em> (Photo Illustration Courtesy of Southwestern College Sports)<br></p> <h3>Choctaw Excels on the Field and in the Books</h3> <p>Southwestern (Kansas) College sophomore Kayla Wilson has been named to the 2014-15 Capital One Academic All-America® College Division Women’s Track &amp; Field/Cross Country Second Team, as announced by the College Sports Information Directors of America.Wilson became one of the miost-decorated track and field student-athletes in the storied history of the Southwestern College women’s track and field program. The Mooreland native finished third in the Triple Jump competition at the 2015 NAIA Outdoor Track and Field National Championships in May in Gulf Shores, Alabama.<br></p> <p>That performance followed a pair of All-American performances in triple jump and long jump and the 2015 NAIA Indoor Track and Field Championships in Geneva, Ohio. Wilson also claimed the Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference long jump and triple jump titles at both the Indoor and Outdoor Championship meets. She was a four-time KCAC Field Athlete of the Week selection. The Capital One Academic All-America® College Division Track &amp; Field/Cross Country Teams are comprised of student-athletes from NAIA, Canadian and two-year institutions.<br></p> <p>To be eligible for consideration, student-athletes much have achieved sophomore academic status or higher, must have attended their respective institution for one full calendar year, must compete in at least 50 percent of his or her athletic events that season, and must possess legitimate athletic statistics.<br></p> <p>Student-athletes must also carry a cumulative grade point average of 3.30 or higher. Student-athletes are nominated first for Academic All-Region consideration.<br></p> <p>First team all-region selections are then sent on to the national ballot for a chance to become an Academic All-American.<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Tue, 25 Aug 2015 18:24:43 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/wilson-on-capital-one-academic-all-america-second-team/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/wilson-on-capital-one-academic-all-america-second-team/ Choctaw Artists Big Part of Labor Day Festival <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3193/ArtShowFest_original.jpg" alt='Choctaw Indian Art Show 2015' /><br> <em>The 2015 Choctaw Indian Art Show poster, featuring a Scissortail Flycatcher, is the work of a previous competition artist, Dylan Cavin.</em><br></p> <h3>More than 200 Artists Expected to Enter Art Show Competition</h3> <p><strong>Tvshka Homma, Okla.</strong> - Choctaw artists have options for participation over the four days of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma’s 2015 Labor Day Festival. A juried competition, booth sales and traditional demonstrations are all part of this event which draws thousands of visitors to the heart of the Choctaw Nation.<br></p> <p>This year’s Choctaw Indian Art Show runs Sept. 5-6 on the Capitol grounds of Tvshka Homma. Those chosen for the annual juried show will have their works hanging in the historic Choctaw Museum for two days of the festival.<br></p> <p>Many of the artists will have their works available for purchase by festival-goers.<br></p> <p>“Based on past years, we expect more than 200 entries to be submitted,” said Shelley Garner, of Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma’s Cultural Services office. Artists may enter up to three pieces for consideration in any of the seven categories.<br></p> <p>The categories include painting, graphics (pen, pencil, photography and mixed media), sculpture, pottery, jewelry, basketry, and cultural (Choctaw specific, which may not fit in any of the other categories).<br></p> <p>Artists must be age 18 or over and CDIB members of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma.<br></p> <p>Three winners will be chosen for each category with prizes ranging from $400 to $100 each. A $500 award will be presented in the Heritage category (a work that tells the Choctaw story); $200 for the People’s Choice (chosen by popular vote); and $1,200 for Best of Show.<br></p> <p><strong>More Artists</strong><br></p> <p>Artist vendors will also set up booths with arts and crafts for sale in designated areas on the festival grounds. For vendor requirements, contact Debbie Damron in the Cultural Events office, (580) 924-8280, extension 2309.<br></p> <p>Traditional arts and crafts people will demonstrate early Chahta lifestyles in the Village site. For information about this part of the festival, contact Theresa Billy, Language Department, (580) 924-8280, extension 2102.<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Tue, 25 Aug 2015 17:55:49 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/choctaw-artists-big-part-of-labor-day-festival/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/choctaw-artists-big-part-of-labor-day-festival/ Young Choctaw Earns Diploma, Pursues Musical Aspirations <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3185/WEB_PYK_AllisonCawthon_original.jpg" alt='Allison Cawthon' /><br> <em>Allison Cawthon smiles in a recent photograph taken before graduating high school. Walking across the stage would represent the culmination of great dedication and sustained hard work in one of the top schools in the nation for the young Choctaw performer. Soon, she would be moving to Florida in pursuit of an education from her ideal music school.</em><br></p> <h3>Cawthon Takes Next Step with Lifelong Dream</h3> <p>Allison Cawthon graduated from Plano West Senior High School in Plano, Texas last June and now, with the help of the Choctaw Nation, intends to continue her academic journey at one of the best music schools in the world: the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami.<br></p> <p>She earned a 2030 on the SAT, a 3.95 GPA, and placed in the top 25% in her class upon graduation at a school in the top 1% in the U.S. She also became a member of the National Honor Society, French National Honor Society, and was a Ventures Scholar.<br></p> <p>“Some people are born to invent; some people are born to play sports; I was born to inspire the world through music,” Cawthon said.<br> Her voice is her main instrument, but Cawthon said she also picked up acoustic guitar, electric guitar, bass guitar, and keyboard in her efforts to inspire emotion in others.<br></p> <p>At age 18, she is following the dream she has had since childhood, and according to Cawthon, her parents have been supportive from the beginning. “Most parents, if they heard that their child wanted to pursue music as their career, would force their child to choose a more ‘practical’ career path,” she said. “But my parents have always supported my dreams.”<br></p> <p>Cawthon’s parents, Kevin and Mary Cawthon, taught her happiness comes from doing what you love and not from money. To help her on her path, they flew with her across the United States to audition at the best music schools to give her the best opportunities possible.<br></p> <p>In the end, Cawthon said, she aims to earn a Ph.D. and teach at the collegiate level.<br></p> <p>A combination of Cawthon’s upbringing, her own strong drive, and a few nudges from the Choctaw Nation are some of the things Cawthon gives credit to in her success.<br></p> <p>In particular, she remembers the Ivy League and Friends conference put on by the Nation, which she said allowed her to meet with many colleges that she had never before considered. She also recalled the Choctaw-funded Princeton Review SAT Prep Course, which she said allowed her to score so well on the test, helping her get accepted to her ideal college.<br></p> <p>“I would like to thank the Choctaw Nation for the amazing support I received,” Cawthon said. “I feel so proud of my heritage, and I am so happy that Native Americans today have the opportunity to go to college and be successful.”<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --> </p> Thu, 20 Aug 2015 14:52:20 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/young-choctaw-earns-diploma-pursues-musical-aspirations/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/young-choctaw-earns-diploma-pursues-musical-aspirations/ Meyer Siblings Aiming Higher in Hoops <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3184/AustinMeyerCOLOR_original.jpg" alt='Austin Meyer' /><br></p> <h3>Meyer Siblings Aiming Higher in Hoops</h3> <p>The brother and sister tandem of Austin and Mariah Meyer are following in the athletic footsteps of their parents.<br></p> <p>Austin Meyer is a 6-9 junior from Mustang and was the starting center on the Mustang High School basketball team this past season. The Broncos went 28-0 this season and seized the Oklahoma Class 6A basketball title.<br>   Austin also plays basketball in the summer for Mokan Elite, a Nike EYBL team. He is, understandably, receiving lots of interest from multiple Division 1 (large school) collegiate programs.<br>   Mariah Meyer is a 5-8 shooting guard for the Lady Tigers of East Central University. She just completed her freshman year. After one season at Tuttle, Mariah’s family moved to Pflugerville, Texas, where she played three years at Hendrickson High School. She earned first-team all-district honors for two of those seasons, as well as academic all-state honors.<br></p> <p>Their father, Patrick Meyer, played basketball at ECU as well as Murray State College. Mom Amber DeGiusti also played hoops at Murray State and she was part of the first women’s cross-country team at ECU. She helped them win the conference title.<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Thu, 20 Aug 2015 14:16:09 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/meyer-siblings-aiming-higher-in-hoops/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/meyer-siblings-aiming-higher-in-hoops/ Educational Talent Search and Making a Difference Programs Host the 2015 – 2016 ACT Prep Workshops <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3183/ACTWorkshop_original.jpg" alt='ACT Workshop' /><br></p> <h3>Educational Talent Search and Making a Difference Programs Host the 2015 – 2016 ACT Prep Workshops</h3> <p>The Educational Talent Search and Making a Difference Programs will be cohosting several ACT Prep Workshops throughout the Choctaw Nation this year. This workshop is an exceptional ACT test-prep opportunity that covers not only what is on the test, but also how to master the techniques necessary to be successful in achieving a higher ACT score. (Note - There will not be a practice test given during this workshop.)<br></p> <p>The workshop covers general ideas about the ACT as a whole, and the individual sections which make up the test. The sections covered are: English (including what the test-makers are looking for and relevant English rules you need to know when taking this section); Math (including exactly what formulas and rules are needed to answer virtually every question); Reading (including three strategies on how to best take the reading comprehension section); and Science Reasoning (including common question types and strategies to better understand reading passages utilized on the test).<br></p> <p>Talent Search has purchased several items which may be loaned to participants to help them prepare for the ACT. We have a number of ACT approved calculators which are pre-programmed by Cargill’s with math formulas and solvers which are needed to help you achieve a higher ACT score in math. Cargill’s ACT Study Guide is also available for loan from the Talent Search library. These loan programs are just one of the many benefits of participating in the Choctaw Nation’s Educational Talent Search program. (Calculators and books are loaned on a first come, first serve basis.)<br></p> <p>Don’t miss out on this free opportunity to learn valuable techniques which will help you master the ACT. To register for one of the workshops hosted by Educational Talent Search and Making a Difference, please call 1-800-522-6170, Extension 2711.<Br></p> <h3>Dates and Locations</h3> <p><strong>September 11, 2015</strong><br> Kiamichi Technology Center<br> Seminar Center<br> Hugo, OK<br></p> <p><strong>October 23, 2015</strong><br> Eastern Oklahoma State College<br> Auditorium<br> McAlester, OK<br></p> <p><strong>December 11, 2015</strong><br> Kiamichi Technology Center<br> Seminar Center<br> Idabel, OK<br></p> <p><strong>February 5, 2016</strong><br> Kiamichi Technology Center<br> Seminar Room<br> Durant, OK<br></p> <p>The sign-in desk at each of the events will open at 8:30 a.m. with workshops starting at 9:00 a.m. and concluding around noon. <strong>Students must be preregistered to attend one of the ACT Workshops.</strong> The registration costs, breakfast, snacks and lunch are provided free of charge to participants of the Talent Search and Making a Difference Programs.<br><br/> Call today to register for a workshop in your area! (1-800-522-6170, Extension 2711)<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Thu, 20 Aug 2015 13:39:46 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/educational-talent-search-and-making-a-difference-programs-host-the-2015-2016-act-prep-workshops/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/educational-talent-search-and-making-a-difference-programs-host-the-2015-2016-act-prep-workshops/ Choctaw Artist Creates Lifetime Legacy <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3181/WEB_AdamsD_1_original.jpg" width="400" alt='Adams Art' /><br> <em>Dianna (Perkins) Adams with a large photo of her portrait of Mary (Qwasawa) Finkbonner. The painting in the photo is actually a smaller version of the 5’ by 7’ original.</em><br></p> <h3>Choctaw Artist Creates Lifetime Legacy</h3> <p>You may have seen the image in the background of this photo when reading about Choctaw Nation’s monthly Heritage Day events. The original is a painting of Mary (Quasawa) Finkbonner, a Lummi elder and great-grandmother-in-law of Choctaw artist Dianna Perkins Adams, the painter of the portrait (also shown in the photo).<br></p> <p>The oldest of five children, Dianna is the daughter of Harold and Nell (Richardson) Perkins. Her father was born in Atoka, Oklahoma the year that Oklahoma became a state. He was a truck driver, mostly for gasoline companies. Her parents met when her father, then driving a taxi, drove his soon-to-be wife to where she worked as a waitress.<br></p> <p>Dianna’s grandfather, Hugh Henry Perkins, was the owner of a livery stable in Atoka. He moved his family to Wichita, Kansas where he became a bookkeeper. <br></p> <p>Her great grandparents were Lyman “L.H.” and Hattie (Stewart) Perkins, donators of land for the town and school at Indianola. Lyman was a member of the Tribal Council and believed to be a Choctaw Light Horseman. Lyman’s parents were George Perkins and Jane Folsom (niece of Peter Pitchlynn). George Perkins was noted in history for taking a case against the federal government to the Supreme Court in regard to illegal selling of Indian lands. <br></p> <p>The love of art first came when Dianna was 10 years old. In school, she felt she had talent, but always thought someone else could do a better job than her. She says that even today, after all her years in the art field; she constantly sees work she feels is better than her own and strives to learn from others. She admits she is a perfectionist and it carries out not only in her art, but in everyday situations. <br></p> <p>At the age of 17, Dianna knew she wanted to become an artist. She started art classes at Wichita State University, paying for her first semester of college with babysitting money she had earned at fifty cents an hour and a summer job with a pilot program of Head Start, working as the assistant teacher. It was through that job that Dianna learned the love of teaching. At one point, she struggled with whether she should become an artist or a teacher. Little did she know her future would be a combination of the two. Having received a rare fifth year degree, a Bachelor of Art Education from Wichita State University, she went on to complete her Master’s Degree and all but her dissertation toward a doctoral degree in Art Education from the University of Oregon.<br></p> <p>At the early age of 27 years old, Dianna became Director of Art Education at Oregon State University. <br></p> <p>She later worked as case manager for the largest sexual discrimination case in the country involving women’s equity in salary, tenure and assignment, taking the case all the way to the Supreme Court. <br></p> <p>Dianna went on to be hired by the University of Oregon as advocate for people who had suffered racial discrimination, and as a counselor. She continued her commitment for social change and also continued to paint and draw, even teaching night classes. Eventually, Dianna decided she wanted to work primarily with Native American students. After a short time with the University of Minnesota as Senior Counselor of the American Indian Learning Resource Center, she took a position on the Lummi Reservation to work at Northwest Indian College as Director of Admissions and Director of Talent Search. <br></p> <p>Two years ago, Dianna married the love of her life, Perry Adams, a member of the Lummi tribe, after 40 years of being single. Dianna and Perry married at an elder’s dinner on the Grand Ronde Reservation in Oregon with over 400 elders from tribes all over the Northwest in attendance. The couple had met after she began working at Northwest Indian College eighteen years ago where Perry served as Chair of the Board of Trustees on two occasions. He was also a Tribal Councilman, Vice-Chair for several years and director of his tribe’s Veterans program. <br></p> <p>Dianna has volunteered with the Lummi tribe since meeting Perry, leaving her regular employment after getting involved with the tribal elders. Her areas of volunteer work with the tribe have included teaching classes to tribal elders of the Dislocated Fisherman’s Program, painting an original art series called “The Grandparents of the Grandparents” and helping to keep Native American children from being fostered out off the reservation. She continues to do work for a research institute she founded called the Lacqtomish (People of the Sea) Research Institute where family structures of the Coastal Salish People are studied. She has aided many individuals in learning how to find their Indian names, a vital part of the northwest culture. She has also helped date back families into the 1700s in the region in connection to the names through history and ancestry.<br></p> <p>Though she has mastered many areas over the span of her 47-year career, Dianna considers her primary art field as portrait painting. Dianna says her paintings are monumental in scale, and they satisfy her soul. One was an 8-foot portrait of her mother’s father with his fiddle at age 19. Even though her paintings are extremely detailed, Dianna is known for painting an entire large portrait in five to seven days, with the refining and finishing processes taking another week. She has an ability to sit before a blank canvas and already have an idea of what the composition will be when finished. Some special projects call for studies beforehand, but most times she relies upon her own expertise. Dianna chooses not to make her art into prints, postcards or greeting cards, as she prefers to keep her work exclusive and one-of-a-kind. <br></p> <p>She has also over the years enjoyed working on her pieces in public areas. Being able to tune out the interruptions, or sometimes drawing them in as needed, she says people have enjoyed watching her work live. She particularly enjoyed doing so in the Lummi Tribal School foyer, where she loved talking to the children of all grades who came to her asking about what she was doing. She says she even let the children help a bit on her pieces in order to teach them. <br></p> <p>Dianna is most pleased with her work when she knows that it moves someone. She considers her greatest compliment being after her work was completed of a portrait of a warrior she did that hangs in a tribal school, grandchildren of the man came in to approve the painting and they were each brought to tears over the likeness. In addition, a shaman who was in the school to perform a ceremonial cleansing saw one of her paintings and offered a plate of food to it through dance. She is grateful for her ability to communicate feelings and emotions through her work, saying it “speaks to the heart of people.” She believes that in her art, if she has done what she set out to do, her work speaks for itself. <br></p> <p>Dianna loves talking about her own tribe’s culture and about art. She said, “Today, I see the young people making pottery in the old ways, and I understand that it is more than a connection to the art. It is also a connection to the land. And our heritage is as much about the land as it is about the language. It instills in us a sense of belonging.” She hopes to soon begin work on a painting of Chief Pushmataha at the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. Dianna says she feels a special connection to Chief Pushmataha because of her family line. <br></p> <p>Dianna has one son, Matthew Kale and one granddaughter, Marie, who the family tragically lost earlier this year at the age of 23. Matthew often sat with his mother as she taught art classes, and he in turn taught his daughter. Matthew is a “maker”, someone who solves problems through design. Marie was a sculptor who was very proud of being Choctaw and carried the Choctaw name, meaning “fire cloud.”<br></p> <p>Dianna credits her husband and son for much of her success, as she says they have endured the disruptions to their lives and her marathon painting sessions. She also notes that in addition to her family, her connection with a small group of other artists over the years has helped her to get to where she is today. <br></p> <p>Today Dianna lives in Washington State, where she and her husband are both retired. Dianna and Perry are in negotiations to develop their own art studio. In their shared space, Dianna will work on her art, hoping to expand into sales for art galleries and Perry will work on carving mortuary canoes. <br></p> <p>Dianna reflects that in going back to her days of teaching art education, she feels that all teaching must begin with the question of “why do I believe this is important?” Dianna has answered this question many times over in her own work. From single working mother to the people’s advocate, art teacher, artist, administrator and tribal volunteer, working 80-100 hours a week most of her professional life, Dianna Perkins Adams has indeed created a legacy. <br></p> <p>(Artwork by Dianna Perkins Adams is listed under the name of Dianna Kale).<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Wed, 19 Aug 2015 16:09:54 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/choctaw-artist-creates-lifetime-legacy/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/choctaw-artist-creates-lifetime-legacy/ Save the Box Tops for Hartshorne Public Schools <p><img src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/choctaw-msldigital/assets/3177/BoxTopLogo_original.jpg" alt='BoxTops2' /><br></p> <h3>Save the Box Tops for Hartshorne Public Schools</h3> <p><strong>Hartshorne, Okla.</strong> - Hartshorne Public Schools has been selected by the Choctaw Nation as the recipient of their Box Tops for Education program for the 2015-16 school year.<br></p> <p>The Box Tops for Education program is a loyalty earnings program. For each participating product purchased, the box top can be clipped and redeemed for 10¢. The money is collected by the coordinating business and mailed to Box Tops for Education. Checks are then mailed to the recipient school twice a year, in April and December.<br></p> <p>Participating schools use the money for needed school supplies, books, playground equipment, teacher training, computers, and other necessities.<br></p> <p>For a list of eligible products see <a href="http://www.boxtops4education.com">Box Tops</a>. For further information, contact Jerry Tomlinson at (580) 924-8280 ext. 2904.<br></p> <p>Box top drop off locations:<br> Choctaw Nation Community Centers<br> Choctaw Nation Travel Plazas<br> Choctaw Nation Headquarters<br></p> <p>Or mail your box tops to:<br> Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma<br> Attn. Jerry Tomlinson<br> P.O. Box 1210<br> Durant, OK 74702<br></p> <p><!-- AddThis Button BEGIN --></p> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook_like" fb:like:layout="button_count"></a> <a class="addthis_button_tweet"></a> <a class="addthis_button_pinterest_pinit"></a> <a class="addthis_counter addthis_pill_style"></a> </div> <script type="text/javascript" src="//s7.addthis.com/js/300/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-51768a9b29d4b994"></script> <p><!-- AddThis Button END --></p> Wed, 19 Aug 2015 15:11:28 GMT http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/save-the-box-tops-for-hartshorne-public-schools/ http://choctawnation.com/news-room/press-room/media-releases/save-the-box-tops-for-hartshorne-public-schools/