Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

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The Turners Submitted by: Jane Proctor Smith Daughter of “Pat” and Pope Proctor Granddaughter of Olga and Robert Turner

Robert Freeman Turner came to Indian Territory from Mississippi about

  1. He is listed on a census of Tobucksy County, I.T. on Choctaw Census Document #13562 (1868-1896) but there is a question about the census date. He came with his mother, Adeliza Smith Turner Howden, and his sister, Medora Turner, who late married Benjamin F. Hightower. Robert’s father died six weeks before he was born. Olga Thressa Standley came to Indian Territory from Mississippi in 1873 with a sister. Her mother, Margaret Padlock Turner, died in 1867 and her father, James Stanley II, died October 1872. Olga and Robert were married in 1876. They were both descendants of the Choctaw chief, Apuckshunnubbee, who died in 1824 at Maysville, Kentucky as the result of a fall. He was enroute to Washington D.C. with a delegation to meet eth President regarding treaty adjustments. Apuckshunnubbee’s daughter, Tioka (Ho t I oka), married Turner Brashears. Their daughter, Lucy Brashears Patton (a widow), married James Stanley 1. Their children were: Eliza, James II, and Amelia. James Standley II married Margaret Tadlock and Olga T. Standley was their daughter. Eliza Standley married Freeman J. Smith, son of John Smith, Jr. who came from Boston, Massachusetts as a Presbyterian missionary to the Choctaw Indians at Elliot Mission, Mississippi. Eliza and Freeman Smith’s daughter, Adeliza Smith, married Robert Turner, Sr. Their children were: Medora and Robert Freeman Turner. Thus, James Standley I was the grandfather of Olga Standley Turner (descended through James Standley II) and the great-grandfather of Robert Freeman Turner (descended through Eliza Standley Sith). Mongo Apuckshunnubbee was Olga Standley Turner’s great-great grandfather and Robert Freeman Turner’s great-great-great-grandfather. Yet, Robert was one year older than Olga. Olga and Robert lived at Canadian, I.T. where he was a partner in Turner and Young Company. They later moved to Indianola where he owned and operated Tuner Mercantile Company. They built a large two-story house with a wrap-around porch in Indianola. He was also a farmer and stockman. He was ahead of his time—practiced crop rotation, terraced his land, planted peas with his corn, and installed a carbide lighting system in his home. Everyone called him “Uncle Bob”. The Turners, like Apuckshunnubbee before them, believed in a good education. After the children graduated from local schools, they went Standley and Puck to Bacone, Jim and Ben to Wentworth Military Academy in Missouri and “Pat’ to Tuskahoma Academy for Girls. Olga and Robert Turner died in 1926 of pneumonia in Norman, Oklahoma. They became ill on the trip from Indianola to Norman. In route, they had to change trains in a cold rainstorm and wait in an unheated depot for the connecting train. He died February 27, 1926 and she died March 3, 1926. The family believed he had a premonition of death because he took Ben and they cleaned off the family cemetery before leaving for Norman. Children of Olga and Robert Freeman Turner. Robert Standley (1878-1967) m. Lena May Terrell Eva Almeda (1879-1903) m. Thomas Edgar Manners Leona Teresa (1882-1978) m. John Greene Terrell James Irwin (1885-1912) m. Laura (“Dottie”) Pearson John Benjamin (1887-1968) m. 1-Maude Dill; 2-Artelee Pierce; 3-Bertie?; 4-Ethel Minyard; 5-Eula Ross; 6-Jo Hamilton West William Foster (1889-1891) Albert Apuckshunnubbee (“Puck”) (1892-1964) m. 1 Abby Mays; 2-Ola Harper Nora Fidelia “Pat” (1895-1978) m. Oliver Pope Proctor Grandchildren of Olga and Robert Freeman Turner Children of Robert Standley: Harold Van Turner (deceased) Mildred Turner Justice; Dallas, TX Children of Eva Almeda: Olga Cynthia and Turner Edgar Manners (Both died as infants) Children of Leona Teresa: Maxine Terrell Miller; Shawnee Mission, KS Artelee Terrell Gerth; Oklahoma City, OK John Robert Terrell (deceased) Child of John Benjamin: Gerald (Turner) Manners (deceased) Children of Nora Fidelia: Olga Jane Proctor Smith; Tulsa, OK Oliver Pope Proctor, Jr.; Bartlesville, OK Great-Grandchildren of Olga and Robert Freeman Turner. Child of Harold: Norman Turner Stubby; Burton, K.S. Children of Artelee: Johnna Gerth Caldwell; Edmond, OK Edgar George Gerth, Jr.; Oklahoma City, OK Children of Olga Jane: Joan Carol Smith Cotton; Tulsa, OK John Proctor Smith; Cypress, TX Children of Oliver Pope: Pamela Lynn Proctor; Tulsa, OK Robert Wayne Proctor; Knoxville, TN Great-Great Grandchildren of Olga and Robert Freeman Turner Children of Norma Stubby: Rae Jene Stubby Beadles, Harold Lee Stubby, Robert LeRoy Stubby, Richard Dean Stubby Children of Johnna Caldwell; Catherine Maxine Caldwell Jones O’Connor, Robert James Caldwell, Jr., Robin Marie Caldwell Green, Christopher Thomas Caldwell Children of Joan Cotton: Stephanie Jane Cotton, Melanie Kathryn Cotton Children of John Smith: Lorrie Jean Smith Reibert, Lani Christine Smith Luza, Lindsey Michelle Smith Children of Robert Proctor: Erin Lynn Proctor, Lara Kelly Proctor Berry Great-Great-Great Grandchildren Of Olga and Robert Freeman Turner Children of Robert Stubby: John Robert Stubby, Raymond Eugene Stubby, Elizabeth Jene Stubby. Children of Robert Stubby: John Robert Stubby, Raymond Eugene Stubby, Elizabeth Jene Stubby Children of Richard Stubby: Jason Andrew Stubby, Joshua Matthew Stubby Children of Catherine O’Connor: Jeromy, Lane, Jones, Sarah, Marie, O’Conner Cara Louise O’Conner Child of Robert Caldwell, Jr.: Bryan Caldwell Child of Robin Green: Nicholas Green Child of Christopher Caldwell: Katelyn Michael Caldwell Children of Lorrie Reibert: Tyler Houston Reibert, Sarah Jordan Reibert Child of Lani Luza: Hayleigh Morgan Luza Child of Kelly Berry: Daniel Robert Berry. Great-Great-Great-Great Grandchildren of Olga and Robert Freeman Turner. Child of John Stubby: Alexander Stubby. The Indian Territory Turners reflect America’s melting pot. They were descended from English immigrants, New England missionaries, and a Choctaw chief, among others. The area around Indianola and Canadian in those early days was wild and primitive. I remember the story of Uncle Ben Hightower going hunting. He killed a deer, tied it behind his saddle and started home. He had to go through a wooded area and a panther jumped on the deer carcass, scaring the horse, causing it to run. Uncle Ben had his hands full trying to control the horse, dodging the limbs, etc. He finally was able to get his knife, cut the thongs – both panther and deer fell off and he was able to get home safely. My mother told us about an incident when she was going somewhere with her mother in a buggy. The horses became frightened and refused to continue. She said they waited for the horses to settle down and soon a huge snake started crossing the road. She said the snake was as large around as her waist and it seemed to take forever for it to get across the road.

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