Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

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Edgar Griffin Crabtree
Submitted by: Helen W. Crabtree

Edgar Griffin Crabtree was born November 9, 1903 near Allen, Oklahoma. His certificate was registered August 11, 1905 in Ada, Oklahoma, on the 17th day of February, 1914 and recorded in Homestead record Vol. 1 Page 522 (The rolls were opened sometime before he was born and closed shortly after). His dad and mother are David Carlton and Georgia Ann Barnett Crabtree. The grandparents were Archibald Barnett and Elizabeth Barnett. My husband Edgar Griffin Crabtree grew up on a farm near Allen, Oklahoma. His mother died when a younger brother, Elvin Jackson, was born. His grandparents came to stay with them until his dad married again several years later. Edgar had a happy childhood. One thing always impressed me was the fact that friends told them they could not tell any difference in the treatment of the original children than the step children or the half brother and sisters.

Edgar was raised in Oklahoma but his dad came from Texas. The parents were Christians and the children were all taught Christian love and principles. Edgar went to grade school in Francis High School in Redrock Oklahoma in western Oklahoma, then to Ada to college. Edgar learned how to work on the farm and when he was old enough to work out he could always find and hold a job for $30.00 a month at a filling station and he worked there for five years and it helped support the entire family. Then as times were better, he had an automobile agency in Borger, Texas. He also worked as an auto mechanic and some as a bookkeeper.

In 1936 at the age of 32 he and I (Helen Winona Armstrong) age 22 were married on November 29, 1936 near Broken Bow, Oklahoma on Bee Creek. We lived at a place called Sand Springs on Mountain Fork river and he worked at a saw mill. The area is all covered with a lake now. We got our mail at the original Hochatown and had many memories there. We had five children. Edgar worked as a bookkeeper at the new town of Disney, Oklahoma and we bought a farm five miles east and ½ mile north of Disney, where we lived for 48 happy years and where I live now. We attended the First Baptist Church in Disney for 41 years and Edgar was superintendent for 32 years. He was also an active deacon and an active worker. He was very proud of his Choctaw heritage.

Edgar’s dad (David Carlton) was a farmer near Allen, Oklahoma. At an early stage of Oklahoma history he had only Indian neighbors and he would trade them post or work for hogs to butcher. He was proud of his Indian friends. It was all open range and he always fed all the hogs regardless of who they belonged to and one early morning he was feeding the hogs and had been feeding them for sometime and someone came up behind him and said, “You god man. You feed Indian hogs.”

They always treated him fair just like he treated them fair. Edgar’s dad and mother had six children. I don’t know how many got an allotment or roll number. I do know the younger one was “too late”.

The six children born to the union of David Carlton and Georgia Ann were:
Earnest Erwin, Born 1893
Early Carlton, Born April 17, 1895
Edna May, Born May 13, 1894
Elmer Lindson, Born June 31, 1898
Edgar Griffin, Born November 9, 1903
Elvin Jackson, Born august 28, 1906

The way Edgar’s dad met his mother has always interested me. David Carlton, his dad, and some others went to a revival meeting and he met this home he told his Dad, “I can’t get that Indian girl off my mind. I’m going back and get her.” He and his brother went back to her folks and talked to them. The mother especially didn’t want her to go but finally gave her consent and told David that she had made her bed, now let her lie in it. They were married Indian fashion, then when they returned to Oklahoma, they were married white man fashion. He liked to tell everyone that they were married twice but never divorced.

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