Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

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Clowers family

Jessica Carter Jessica Carter

posted on August 14, 2010

I am looking into the maiden name of Ella Clowers. She was married to Joshua Clowers and was suppose to be 100% Choctaw. Her daughters name was Mary Clowers. Anyone with any info woud be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on August 14, 2010

genealogists use dates, names, locations, children and spouses to match records.

joshua clowers m. ella ?>mary clowers
no dates, locations in your post.

the clowers listed n the dawes roll were mississippi choctaw. this is a separate tribe. but no ella, joshua or mary.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php

World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
about Joshua L Clowers
Name: Joshua L Clowers
County: McCurtain
State: Oklahoma
Birth Date: 27 Nov 1872
Race: White
FHL Roll Number: 1851808
DraftBoard: 0
(FHL is family history library)

Name Age
Josh Clowers 57
Laura Clowers 50
joshua was b. AR,, parents b. AR. he’s a farmer, first married at age 26.
laura was b. MS, parents b. MS, first married at age 19.

Name Age
Joshua Clowers 47
Ella Clowers 40
Mary Clowers 20
Source Citation: Year: 1920;Census Place: Frisco, McCurtain, Oklahoma; Roll T625_1469; Page: 20B; Enumeration District: 141; Image: 181.
mary was b. TX.

it appears that this family might have been mississippi choctaw, as the trail of tears didn’t go through texas. many unofficial migrations did go through texas.

Josh Clowers 37
Ella Clowers 30
Mary E Clowers 10
Elgin Clowers 7
Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Township 3, McCurtain, Oklahoma; Roll T624_1261; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 181; Image: 837.
elgin was b. TX

Name Age
Jos L Clowers 20
Ellen Clowers 20
Mary Clowers 10/12
Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Little River, Little River, Arkansas; Roll T623_65; Page: 28A; Enumeration District: 74.

he was not living in oklahoma by 1900. the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906.

Name Age
Elgin Clowers 26
Essie M Clowers 24
Luster L Clowers 6
Loyd Clowers 5
Beulah Clowers 4 8/12
Edward A Clowers 3 1/12
Ervin Clowers 1 8/12
Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Precinct 3, Bowie, Texas; Roll 2300; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 22; Image: 781.0.

California Death Index, 1940-1997
about Elgin S Clowers
Name: Elgin S Clowers
Social Security #: 445109732
Sex: MALE
Birth Date: 21 May 1902
Birthplace: Texas
Death Date: 11 May 1958
Death Place: Sacramento
Mother’s Maiden Name: Larry
Father’s Surname: Clowers

you should write for birth certificates, death certificates, marriage license.
if you get stuck, anyone who passed away after 1/1/1937 filed a social security application that lists dates, locations, parents’ names. they had to file a birth certificate or delayed birth certificate for proof of age.

there were 790,391 people in oklahoma in 1900, so bear this in mind, if you just want to find your relative.

you just have to learn how to use the tools. plan your research. download the legacy software free http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/ , so that you have the information organized.

excellent tips here http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research.html
http://www.broomfieldenterprise.com/ci_15379828 internet information and records that are not usually found online.

this resource was developed for the choctaw tribe, however many links have information on other tribes. the type of records and location of those records are often kept by the same agency/government office. native census records are separate from other census records – nontaxed natives were not on the federal census. if your ancestors were on the federal census, they were probably living off reservation at that time. sometimes the federal government requested “rolls” be taken. tribal membership records (census card and application) are often helpful whether that person was accepted for membership or not. land records can show whether someone accepted a land grant in lieu of tribal enrollment (these are called scrip, in the land records) so look at the authority of any land record that was given to your ancestors. in the 1900’s and beyond, there was tribal probate for tribal members. many people chose to get married “the native way” and marriages might be recorded in tribal courts or noted in tribal records. on reservation, the authority was the tribal government or the agent. so records from the 1880’s on can often be found there. (if you are a tribal member, you should try to visit the NARA repository for your tribal records and look at them. several records are still not copied or public.) if you find that i have named a record and given a link for that record and nothing like that exists for your tribe at that location, try searching for a similar type of record for your tribe using google. look for directories of information on your tribe that might list many useful links. http://www.cyndislist.com/native.htm is a good place to start. i searched for cherokee on cyndislist and got 10 pages (of 10 links each) of links. this native american page is only one of the links.

choctaw tribe in oklahoma: applications
http://www.choctawnation.com/services/choctaw-nation-applications/
you must file a CDIB application first, be accepted, then you can apply for tribal membership.

these departments are under community services:
http://www.choctawnation.com/services/departments/

CDIB & Tribal Membership Applications
Brenda Hampton, Executive Director
(800) 522-6170
Genealogy Advocacy

Vicki Prough, Genealogy Advocate
(800) 522-6170
The Genealogy Advocacy Program provides ancestry information from the Dawes Commission Roll to assist tribal members or potential tribal members in verifying lineage for CDIB applications and family histories. Assistance is also provided as to where other documentation useful in genealogy research may be found.

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/
this is a good native resource.
http://www.angelfire.com/tx/carolynegenealogy/notesdirectory/index.blog?topic_id=13193
information and resources available for several tribes
pioneer papers of oklahoma, a good source of information about original settlers.
http://digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/pioneer/search.asp?term=mcdonald&type=0&name=Go
you can search for surnames and locations. be sure and search for spelling variations, as misspellings are in the original file.

this is an overview of cherokee records, for instance:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~itcherok/genealogy/tips.htm
oklahoma became a state from the Indian Territory on November 16, 1907. this is a listing of early government documents:
http://www.library.okstate.edu/scua/collect/okgovdocs/index.htm the M# is the group # used by NARA.
http://www.tolatsga.org/Cherokee1.html

an oklahoma website: http://www.okgenweb.org/ this is a new address so if you run into a broken link on this email, you might check here first, to see if you can find the information through this website. several websites have recently changed addresses.
you can google the type of record that you seek also, if a link is broken.

heritage and enrollment are often two different ideas. check the enrollment requirements for the tribe, both current requirements and past requirements. you must be directly descended from an original settler who was accepted for membership in the tribe, in order to apply for membership. residence on the reservation is only one indication of affiliation with a tribe. many bands of natives lived in close proximity with other bands of natives. we often lump several bands together and designated them as a tribe. however, some bands made different decisions (residence, tribal government, relationship to the white man’s government) from their tribe. enrollment was controversial. most treaties that established tribal existence also had a termination clause that individual native heads of household could choose which could make tribal enrollment impossible for their descendants.

research the tribe’s language. most native american languages were oral before the government established reservations and written forms were only developed in the middle 1800’s. this means that the natives valued oral tradition and didn’t keep records themselves. so the government might be the only repository of information for your tribe in the 1800’s. trading post records and local historical book mentions might be the only other sources of information. fur trappers were early residents and often intermarried with local residents. sometimes there is a reference to a trapper and his native wife.

very few native records exist before 1800. very few slave records exist before 1860. the southern tribes did agree with slavery and did keep slaves themselves, however slavery as an idea might be vary, ranging from “responsible for” to “ownership of”. government policy in the 1800’s indicate that mixture of races (native and black, for instance) was desirable. sometimes the government saw this as an opportunity to terminate the tribal membership. government policy was always very unpopular with the natives because “promises” (made by different people) were not kept and expectations were not met and some natives just got tired of this type of thing and left the reservation unofficially. that kind of anger also caused many natives to affiliate with one or the other side of the civil war.

research is a process. i look up information on one person at a time. one of the things i do is open up a tab for each area:

1) dawes roll http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
if the tribe is not one of the five civilized tribes, you might want a webpage that has the most resources listed for your tribe. for instance, you might want to use this instead for the mississippi choctaw: http://www.nanations.com/mschoctaw/
recognized tribes by state and federal governments organized by state:
http://www.aaanativearts.com/indian_tribes_by_states.htm
names of chiefs and districts http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Choctaw_chiefs

one of the requirements for membership in the choctaw tribe is that the family be living in oklahoma by 1900 permanently. another requirement is that the family had gone on the trail of tears in the late 1830’s. early in the enrollment process, some families petitioned the council to waive the requirement about the trail of tears and the council did that for a few families. however, at some point, a decision was made not to waive this requirement. so many families didn’t apply because they were not eligible. also enrollment was controversial and some natives who did otherwise qualify didn’t apply.
if you think your family might be mississippi choctaw or belonged to another tribe, some links are in this email.

Oklahoma State Recognized Tribes
Some tribal groups which are not federally recognized are state-recognized. Most states have a recognition process independent of federal recognition. Currently, there are no tribes recognized by the state of Oklahoma, independant of federal recognition. However, there are several petitioning tribes and some unrecognized tribes that are neither federally recognized or state recognized in Oklahoma.
http://www.oklahoma-tribes.com/oklahoma-state-recognized-tribes/
settlement of some natives in texas, with pictures and names: http://www.redeaglejw.net/oldchahtaorg/thompsonchoctawphoto.htm

The state of Oklahoma has the third largest native american population of any US state, exceeded by only California and Arizona. Thirty-eight federally recognized indian tribes have their headquarters in Oklahoma, and according to the 1990 US Census, members of sixty-seven tribes reside there. More than 25 Native American languages are spoken in Oklahoma, the most of any state.
http://www.oklahoma-tribes.com/
a list of alabama indians in texas, special report to congress 1/5/1911
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/alabama_indians_in_texas.htm
click on “read list of names” to see if your ancestor is listed.

2) rootsweb http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/
3) land records http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/Default.asp?
4) ancestry http://www.ancestry.com/
5) heritage quest, if necessary ( usually accessed through my local library website, under databases)
6) google http://www.google.com
7) choctaw marriage records http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/chocmarriageindex.htm
(there are other marriage records here too, look on the left of the page)

i use google to search for names, obituaries, state archives, county records, google books, newspapers. this email is intended to encourage you.

there is an email list to help newbies learn how to do genealogy:
http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/other/Miscellaneous/GEN-NEWBIE.html
you can browse the email list for topics or search for a topic or join the list and ask your question.

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
if you find your relative on the dawes roll 1896-1906, you should write to NARA and ask for a copy of the census card and dawes packet, instructions in this email. NARA=national archives and records administration.
click on the # in the card column to see the family group.

this website contains pages from an application, so that you can see the kind of information commonly contained in an enrollment application.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/dawes/john_r_white_application_packet.htm
the information in an application packet varies about quality and quantity of documents.

in order to show tribal membership eligibility, you must be directly related to an original enrollee. if you are not, you might be affiliated with another tribe, such as the mississippi choctaw, the jena choctaw, the mowa band of choctaw, or the melungeon, or another tribe. be sure to check the state for a possible reservation. there are state-recognized tribes and federal-recognized tribes. usually, the only time people submitted ancestry was when they applied to a tribe. if they didn’t apply, you might have to find affiliation through a termination indication, such as a choctaw scrip land record.

there are other native census records and databases that might help you. click on the left of the dawes webpage.
http://www.nanations.com/choctaw/index.htm
other native america records held by NARA:
http://www.archives.gov/southwest/finding-aids/native-american-microfilm.html
freedman resources: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/african/oklahoma/
1885 census in the southeast choctaw tribe called the cooper roll: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/cooper/index.htm
names several bands.

this book might be helpful. you can download it from this link:

http://books.google.com/books?id=chATAAAAYAAJ

Five civilized tribes in Oklahoma reports of the Department of the interior and evidentiary papers in support of S. 7625, a bill for the relief of certain members of the five civilized tribes in Oklahoma.
by United States. Dept. of the Interior.

Type: Book : National government publication : Microfiche; English
Publisher: Washington : G
you can search for names or locations with the search function on google books.
i strongly urge you to try to search for your family with this book because the heritage information available here is excellent.
reading pages 1-13 about tribal membership requirements. mississippi choctaw.

the history of the choctaw, enrollment history
“The Choctaws’ story illuminates a key point in contemporary scholarship on the history of American Indians: that they were not passive victims of colonization and did not assimilate quietly into American society. The Choctaws in Oklahoma illustrates one tribe’s remarkable success in asserting its sovereignty and establishing a national identity in the face of seemingly insurmountable legal obstacles.”—BOOK JACKET.

The Choctaws in Oklahoma: From Tribe to Nation, 1855-1970
By Clara Sue Kidwell, Lindsay G. Robertson
Contributor Lindsay G. Robertson
Edition: illustrated
Published by University of Oklahoma Press, 2007
ISBN 0806138262, 9780806138268
320 pages
it is a google book, so you can put in search terms and google will allow you to download it or search online.

if you are already a member of the tribe and have not corrected your address, the tribe would like address corrections on these names:
http://www.choctawnation.com
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
P.0. Box 1210
Durant, OK 74702-1210
1-800-522-6170

http://www.rootsweb.com
the social security death index 1964-present. anyone who passed away after 1/1/1937 has an application on file but the earlier deaths are not in the public index. often dates and places of significance are in this record, such as date of marriage, maiden names, locations, date of birth.

rootsweb has messageboards and webprojects for surnames, locations, tribes. the messageboards have email lists. if you join an email list, try the digest form. rootsweb also has a newbie genealogy email list where you can get answers to your questions about how to do genealogy.

you should write to anyone who posts about your family, trade information and sources.
once you gather documentation, maybe you will consider putting your family tree information on rootsweb worldconnect so that others might find your family too. do not use the names of people who are still living. we use “living” for that.

http://www.ancestry.com

contact your local public library about access to census records. they usually have a subscription to ancestry or heritage quest.

The Largo Florida Public Library offers Heritage Quest Online for Census searches without the prerequisite of a library card number. Click on HeritageQuest at the link below.

http://pals.polarislibrary.com/polaris/Search/misc/esources.aspx?ctx=27.1033.0.0.4&Category=1431

for maps, you might try interlibrary loan for these books:
http://home.earthlink.net/~dawise/Atlas.htm

Eddie Hastain (1869-1943) was an attorney who came toMuskogee, Indian Territory, around 1900. After becoming interested in landownership of properties in Indian Territory, he compiled and published two landownership atlases: Hastain’s Township Plats of the Creek Nation (Hastain 1910), consisting of 149 maps, and Hastain’s Township Plats of the Seminole Nation (Hastain 1913), containing 28 maps. He also compiled and published three indexes to the original landowners in the Creek, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Nations. These were the Index to Choctaw-Chickasaw
Deeds and Allotments (Hastain, 1908); Supplement to Index of Choctaw-Chickasaw Deeds and Allotments (Hastain, 1910); and Index to Creek Deeds and Allotments (Hastain, 1910). In 1915, J. Reed Moore of Wewoka, Oklahoma, published Moore’s Seminole Roll and Land Guide (Moore, 1915), consisting of 28 plat maps and 53 pages of text. The plat maps were credited to Eddie Hastain and were used with his permission in this publication.
mississippi map: http://www.rootsweb.com/~msgenweb/na-index/map.htm

http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgenweb/okprojects/xref/help/str-regions.htm

if you want to help others, look for little tasks that you could do that would improve peoples’ access to information. for instance, this page needs someone to type an index of surnames of each nation sorted by surname and submitted to the person who owns the webpage – then people could look these census pages up by surname. format?
last name first name page # submit to bcchoate@yahoo.com re: http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
and tell her which nation you did.
another volunteer project:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~okleflor/lookup/census.htm
this is the 1860 census of the indian territory. since this is an untaxed native reservation, you will not find people living in the indian territory on the federal census list. they would only be on this census.
another project: http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ok/nations/itchoctaw/itchoctaw.html
several transcriptions: http://www.rootsweb.com/~okleflor/lookup/census.htm
1855 eastern choctaw census http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/cooper/index.htm
1885 choctaw census
there are other census documents and they would appreciate a transcription. if you have access to the microfilm through the family history library or NARA, they would appreciate a transcription by a volunteer.
http://www.us-census.org/native/choctaw.html
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~oxford/choccen.htm
click on the volunteer to transcribe link for more information.
if you are looking for another tribe, http://www.us-census.org/native/5_civlilized_tribes.html
freedmen who left the reservation http://www.african-nativeamerican.com/leave.htm
freedmen http://www.angelfire.com/ok3/freedmen/chocfreed.html
several resources for freedmen http://anpa.ualr.edu/other_resources/black_indian_history/black_indian_freedman_choctaw.htm
http://www.choctawchickasawfreedmen.com/
1860 mississippi choctaw census
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ms/choctaw/census/1860/0000read.htm
INDIAN TERRITORY ITS CHIEFS, LEGISLATORS AND LEADING MEN
history/chiefs: http://www.choctawnation.com/History/
lots of original enrollee interviews: http://www.choctawnation.com/history/people/original-enrollees/
choctaw tribe in florida: http://chattinchoctawnewsletter.org/default.aspx

there is an email list to help newbies learn how to do genealogy:
http://lists.rootsweb.ancestry.com/index/other/Miscellaneous/GEN-NEWBIE.html
you can browse the email list for topics or search for a topic or join the list and ask your question.

http://books.google.com/books?id=chATAAAAYAAJ

Five civilized tribes in Oklahoma reports of the Department of the interior and evidentiary papers

in support of S. 7625, a bill for the relief of certain members of the five civilized tribes in

Oklahoma.
by United States. Dept. of the Interior.

Type: Book : National government publication : Microfiche; English
Publisher: Washington : G
you can search for names or locations with the search function on google books.
i strongly urge you to try to search for your family with this book because the heritage

information available here is excellent.
reading pages 1-13 about tribal membership requirements. mississippi choctaw.

tribe websites – MOWA and jena choctaw
MOWA natives: http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
The MOWA band of Choctaw Indians occupies an area in south Washington County and north Mobile County near the southwest Alabama towns of Citronelle, Mount Vernon, and McIntosh. The band takes
their name from the first two letters of Mobile and Washington counties, where members settled,
straddling the county line. The group was formally recognized as a tribe by Alabama in 1979, but
has not received recognition from the federal government, despite tribal members’ efforts.

http://mowachoctaw.org/
Jena Band of Choctaw Indians
Brief Historical Summary
The earliest recorded notice of the Choctaw Indians is believed to be about 1540, in the area of
southern Mississippi and in the early 1700s near present-day Mobile, Alabama, Biloxi, Mississippi,
and New Orleans, Louisiana. Inland from these settlements there was a large tribe of Muskogean
speaking people occupying about 60 towns on the streams that formed the headwaters of the
Pascagoula and Pearl Rivers.

After the relinquishment of the Louisiana Colony by France, members of the tribe began to move
across the Mississippi River. By the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek in September of 1830 the main
body of the Choctaw ceded all their land east of the Mississippi river. The Choctaw began to
migrate even further away from their original territory. One band settled in a sizable village near
present-day Enterprise, Louisiana and other groups migrated to the pine covered hills of what was
then Catahoula Parish in Louisiana. Eventually the Choctaw, located between present day Monroe and
Natchitoches, Louisiana, joined the group in Catahoula Parish. Principle settlements were established on Trout Creek in LaSalle Parish and Bear Creek in Grant Parish.

http://www.jenachoctaw.org/
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~pennstreet/IndianTerr.htm

cherokee tribe: http://www.cherokee.org/

there are also state recognized tribes and reservations. for instance, here’s some information on texas tribes.
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm
http://www.cam-info.net/cyberindians.html
pay close attention to where your ancestors lived, others in the community. sometimes you can get clues on tribal affiliation by finding neighbors.
issues about tribal names/authority:
http://www.manataka.org/page1334.html http://www.manataka.org/
florida tribes: http://www.aaanativearts.com/tribes-by-states/florida_tribes.htm
a partial list of unrecognized tribes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unrecognized_tribes
bia list of unrecognized tribe and status: http://www.doi.gov/bia/docs/ofa/admin_docs/Petitioners_by_State_092208.pdf
note that this url might change if superceded.
IF YOU SHOULD BE A MEMBER OF AN UNRECOGNIZED TRIBE, I WOULD SUGGEST YOU CONTACT THAT TRIBE ASAP.
tribal government information
http://www.ourcourts.org/learn-about-civics/tribal-government/southeast
an interesting nonprofit: http://chaijnsministries.org/ re: energy efficiency, i guess.
scrip land records information is in a google book:
Land & property research in the United States
By E. Wade Hone
Published by Ancestry Publishing, 1997
ISBN 091648968X, 9780916489687
517 pages
just search for the book title on google, read pages 203-211 in particular.
use in conjuction with this: http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/
search land patents for particular surnames, particular person’s name.
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ok/marshall/history/before.txt indian territory history

genealogists like to see birthdate, place of birth, date of death, place of death, childrens’ names/birthdates/birth places, spouse name and maiden name. how you do genealogy: start with what you know, gather documentation, and then go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates, their marriage certificate, and then go backward in time. usually the married name is used for census and death records. the genealogy is usually done with the maiden name. we usually look for the current name in the census and the married name in death indexes.

http://www.rootsweb.com
the social security death index on rootsweb shows people who passed away after 1963. if your relative passed on after 1/1/1937, social security has an application on file. write a ss-5 letter to request a copy. see rootsweb for the cost and format or call the social security administration. search for the name used by the deceased at the time of their death. although we generally use the maiden name for genealogy, the death indexes are under the name used at the time of death. census records are under the name used at the time of the census.

you should search the rootsweb webprojects and messageboards for surnames, tribe and location. genealogists usually use county and state. the messageboards have email lists. and rootsweb has a newbie genealogy email list, where they answer your questions about how
to do genealogy. if you join an email list, try the digest form. http://www.rootsweb.com

http://www.ancestry.com or heritage quest databases will give you census records from 1930 down to the 1700’s. call your local public libraries for access to one or both of them. it is beneficial to use both databases. remember to check for misspellings of names. with
ancestry, you can use a wild card search, such as jos* would be for any names starting with “jos”.

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/frameset_search.asp
oklahoma newspaper http://www.rootsweb.com/~okbits/

education in genealogy: http://home.byu.edu
search for online genealogy and take the free online courses. they do have university credit classes also. classes that say “paper” means that they give you a book. online classes are the same as paper, if that is the option. grades are advisory only for personal enrichment classes. you can do the classes at your own pace and register for another one right after finishing a course or take them concurrently. they also offer courses for university credit, but they cost $.
FHGEN70 is the first one. the rest of the classes can be taken after that. FHGEN is about organizing your research.

http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/

for the software. price is $0 for the standard edition.

please note. i have only explored a few of the following links and certainly didn’t explore them in depth. you should look at all of them.

this email will give you many links to help you along the way.

if you write NARA (national archives and records administration) for the copy of the application and your relative doesn’t have anything in the file, try their parents application. if you see your family, write to NARA for a copy of the application. NARA’s address is in this email. you can click on the # in the card column to see the family group.
page images, if you are unsure about your family’s surname spelling:

http://www.archives.gov/research/arc/native-americans-final-rolls.html#list

tutorial on the dawes roll, shows what records you can get:
http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/tutorial/dawes/dawes-how-to.pdf
this is a VERY GOOD tutorial about the federal government records for native americans.
http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/heritage/native-american/ancestor-search.html
summary of the type of records maintained by the federal government.
if you are choctaw and you see relatives on the choctaw dawes roll, the tribe will currently mail you a copy of the original settlers’ application for membership. this is a very generous offer.

guide to the codes:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/enroll/guide.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
look at the links on this webpage, particularly the native census.
click on the # in the card column to see the family group.

to get the NARA dawes roll packet and census card:

once you find your relative on the dawes roll:

note all family members and the card number. original enrollee is often a parent.
find the original enrollee:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalindex.php
get their roll#

how to get a dawes packet and census card:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/enroll/info.htm

Include the following with your order

Your name, address, city, state and phone number
Name of the person you are seeking
Records Requested

Age of Person (1900 census)

Place of Residence (1900 census)

card# and roll#

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/enroll/form.htm
form to get census card and dawes packet

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalindex.php
This is the index to the names of individuals entitled to enrollment on the rolls of the various tribes comprising the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory (Oklahoma). Each index entry gives an enrollee’s name and final roll number. After a person’s enrollment category and final roll number have been determined, the final rolls can be searched to discover the enrollee’s census card number. A copy of the census card can be obtained by writing the National Archives—Southwest Region, P.O. Box 6216, Fort Worth, TX 76115-0216.

The cost is $10 per census card. Our search is setup so that you can try to find the roll number in our online Dawes Roll. Simply click on the url, and search the results to see if you can find the tribe member. Because each tribe used the same roll numbers, there are
duplicates because parents were included in their childrens’ families.

Make sure you find the correct census card for your ancestor, before trying to order. Not all roll numbers mentioned in this index, have a corresponding person mentioned in the Dawes Roll.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~itchocta/

if your genealogy involves an adoption, contact for these states might be helpful:
http://www.abcadoptions.com/adoptionrecords.htm

many oklahoma pioneer papers:
http://www.okgenweb.org/pioneer/pioneer.htm

several tribal governments: http://www.ncai.org/index.php?id=125&selectpro_letter=M
tribes are recognized federally and by state.
land patents http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/
United States, Bureau of Land Management. Mississippi Land Records Original data: United States, Bureau of Land Management. Mississippi Pre-1908 Patents: Homesteads, Cash Entry, Choctaw Indian Scrip and Chickasaw Cession Lands. General Land Office Automated Records
Project, 1997.
About Mississippi Land Records
This database contains information on Mississippi (U.S.A.) land records. The database comes from the Bureau of Land Management’s Mississippi Pre-1908 Homestaed and Cash Entry Patent and Cadastral Survey Plat Index. Information recorded in the collection includes patentee name, land office, legal description, etc.

i can’t necessarily recommend this website because i don’t know anything about them, but it might help you. http://www.amerindgen.com/Apps.html
http://www.kindredkonnections.com/
http://www.intl-research.com/expect.htm
http://www.intl-research.com/native.htm
http://www.rootsweb.com messageboards, different records, email lists for surname, location, tribes and a genealogy newbie email list where you can ask questions about how to do genealogy. try the digest form, where you get one email a day with all the posts to that list. also try a general search, look at worldconnect records.
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/people/original-enrollees/
Most of these inteviews are already part of a copyrighted book, “The Life and Times of the Original Choctaw Enrollees”, though I understand that some are not. Some of that material is available in the book. You can purchase it through the Choctaw Bookstore at

http://www.choctawschool.com/store/detail.aspx?ID=24

choctaw classes on various subjects: http://www.choctawschool.com/FlexWeb/Section.aspx?sec=8

many native languages were oral and only written in the middle of the 1800’s. this means that natives are not likely to have records of your ancestors. NARA, national archives of records administration, have most of the native records kept by the federal government. other records might be found in trading post journals or historical books. some of the early native records record that transliterated native name but it might be difficult to find the english name by which the native later was known. don’t discount the possible family websites or family trees on the internet. much of a family’s history was passed orally and some families might have more oral tradition than others. if you see a family website, write to the owner of that website – trade information and resources. cousins are generally delighted to meet/help.

chickasaw research webpage http://www.chickasawhistory.com/
chickasaw lands in oklahoma
chickasaw history
http://www.tolatsga.org/chick.html

addresses and phone numbers of many tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.thepeoplespaths.net/OKTribes.htm
http://www.hanksville.org/sand/contacts/tribal/states.php?whichstate=OK&title=Oklahoma
tribes and native locations:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ok/marshall/census/bkgrnd.txt
redbone tribe/melungeons http://afrigeneas.com/forum-world/index.cgi?noframes;read=122
http://www.melungeons.com/articles/jan2003.htm
http://hometown.aol.com/bbbenge/page15.html
http://www.melungeonhealth.org/info.html
http://www.murrah.com/gen/redbones.htm
http://www.iigs.org/newsletter/9810news/melungeo.htm.en
jena band http://www.jenachoctaw.org/ in louisiana

texas tribes:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm

creek links:
http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/CC/bmc92.html

http://www.genealogynation.com/creek/
http://www.nanations.com/creek/index.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/creek/index.htm

whether your find your family on this user-entered database or not, maybe you will put your family information once you have some sources of information. that way others can find your family. always write to people who post about your family. cousins enjoy hearing from other relatives. trade information and sources.

messageboards for surnames http://www.genealogy.com

http://www.rootsweb.com

write to anyone who posts about your family, trade information and sources. if you leave a messageboard post, leave complete information, such as name, maiden name, spouse, children, dates or approximate dates, locations. this identifying information can help others find your relative in their database. then include what you know in the body of the message, like your sources of information. then put what you want to find out. if information is unverified, you can put a question mark next to it, like b. michigan? county names are more useful than city names in genealogy. including places that they lived is useful. and if you post, make your subject descriptive, like cecil d. jenkins, oregon b. 1/1/1942 flint, michigan m. jane doe. (b.=born, m.=married, d.=death)

A marriage record is just one of several ways to find a maiden name of a married woman. Ten sources that may offer clues to the woman’s maiden name…

1. Woman’s birth certificate if born within last 100 years. contact the state’s vital records office.
2. All children’s death certificates, living into the 20th century.
3. Copy of her obituary. Check to see if father or brother survived her; one out of five obituaries give clear indication of her maiden name.
4. Check children’s marriage certificates.
5. Newspaper account of marriage.
7. Divorce papers
8. County Histories
9. Widow’s Military Pension
10. Wills and Probate Records check County Courthouses in Oklahoma

death indexes use the married name, census records use the current name, and genealogy is usually traced with the maiden name.

check http://www.rootsweb.com for your relatives’ name (use the last
known surname and then try with the maiden name). you need to send social security an ss-5 letter, if you request the application.
Pushmataha County, Oklahoma
CHOCTAW FULL BLOOD DOCKET
Transcribed by: Teresa Young

Each probate case varies in page count.
Instructions for ordering Choctaw Full Blood Docket Records:
When you write to the Court Clerk, send a Stamped Self-Addressed Envelope ask them to count the pages in the docket package, so you will know how much money to send. Be sure to give the information as shown below. WARNING!!! Some probate records may be missing.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER (example)
Case #599, Page 115, January 24, 1914:
Case #600, Page 115, January 24, 1914:
Case #605, Page 116, January 27, 1914:
In the Matter of the Estate of William Alexander, Deceased.
To filing petition.
To filing recording order approving deed.
To issuing papers. To certified copy.

Price per copy: $1.00 for 1st page, additional copies .50 each. Send Stamped Self Addressed

Envelope to:

Pushmataha County Courthouse
Court Clerk
203 S. W. 3rd
Antlers, Oklahoma 74523
Phone: (580) 298-2274
http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ok/county/pushmataha/CFB.html
other records:
http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ok/county/pushmataha/index.html

about primary sources:

Primary Source – a source created at the time of the event, as opposed to records written in later years. For example, a primary source for a birth date would be a birth certificate.
Other documents such as marriage and death certificates might also include a date of birth, but would not be considered primary sources for the birth date since they were created long after the birth.
http://www.byubroadcasting.org/Ancestors/records/glossary/
Examples of primary sources are a midwife’s journal entry describing the birth of a child she delivered; a christening entry in a parish register, recorded by the priest who performed the rite or by the parish clerk who witnessed it. The oral testimony of a mother
describing the birth of one of her children would also be a primary source for that child’s birth.

A secondary source is based upon evidence gathered after an event occurred by a person who was not an eyewitness. A death certificate is a secondary source of birth data as well as marriage data, although it is a primary source for verifying a person’s death date and place. A daughter’s testimony about the date and place of her parents’ marriage is a secondary source because it is based on her knowledge of documentary evidence and the observation of when her parents celebrated their wedding anniversary.

Secondary sources are as valuable as primary sources if they contain accurate descriptions of events. In general, however, primary sources are more reliable descriptions of events, especially if the eyewitness recorded his or her testimony at the time of the event.
Dates and personal and place names can be erroneously recorded in both primary and secondary sources. When several conflicting names or dates exist, the researcher should determine the earliest occurrences of the names and dates in primary sources. Normally evidence from primary sources would take precedence. If a census reported a person’s age as 20 in 1850 and yet their birth record gave 1835 as the date, the birth record would take precedence.

Nevertheless, sometimes a primary source may be wrong.

When in doubt compare primary sources with other sources, especially records based on the testimony of close relatives of eyewitnesses: children, siblings, spouses and parents. When verifying oral or documentary evidence, it is not necessary to evaluate every date,
name and place. A researcher can take a sample – one in ten, for example – of the dates, names and places found in a genealogy or an interview and check them against primary sources: birth, marriage and death records are examples.

http://www.genealogy.com/tip12.html

http://www.genealogy.com/37_neill.html

one of the problems with death certificates is that it depends who the informant was, what the informant knew. sometimes the informant is a landlord or another disinterested party.
sometimes the informant is a child of the deceased. i ran up against this when i had to give my husband’s information after he passed away. social security and other agencies asked me questions about events that i didn’t know about directly. i was his second wife and they asked me questions about his former wife, his parents who had passed away long
before i met him. and if i hadn’t done genealogy on his family, i probably wouldn’t have known the answers to some of their questions.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~vagenealogy/sources.htm
http://genealogy.about.com/library/authors/ucbishop4a.htm

marriage books: http://www.genwed.com/state/okgen1.htm
http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgarvin/kinard/chicmarriageindex.htm
check your time period and your location to figure out where it will be likely to find a marriage. various records, marriage, birth, wills, etc.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgs/records.htm
http://marti.rootsweb.com/okmarr/marriage.htm
http://www.chickasawhistory.com/m_index.htm

vital records for oklahoma: http://www..health.state.ok.us/program/vital/brec.html
some famous choctaw names and relationships:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/mississippi.html
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/choctaw_politics.html
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/surname.html
tribes and chiefs: http://www.worldstatesmen.org/US_NativeAM.html
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/v017/v017p007.html
http://www.valdostamuseum.org/hamsmith/EtowahMounds.html
native religion/worship/structures
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf/malangu.htm discussion of mulattos – check your surnames

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaws history of the tribe
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Dixie_(Oklahoma) little dixie

there was once one tribe, the choctaw, but after the trail of tears the government designated two tribes, choctaw and mississippi choctaw. the creeks, chickasaw and cherokee seem to be related to the choctaw. the choctaw came to oklahoma on the trail of tears in the late 1830’s but some of them stopped off and worked while they traveled. one
requirement is that they had to be in oklahoma by 1900. the mississippi choctaw were from the same tribe but they did not make the trip to oklahoma as ordered. many said that they were too poor to travel. the government gave some of them land in mississippi and alabama.
some of them traveled to oklahoma later but were unable to get enrolled. the mississippi choctaw were recognized as a tribe many years later. one of the requirements for membership
in this tribe is that you have to be 1/2 mississippi choctaw. each tribe is separate and can make their own membership rules. you should verify these rules with the tribe if you have any question.

oklahoma court cases and marriage licenses: http://www.odcr.com/search.php
http://www.oklachahta.org/new%2003%20genealogy.htm
you might want to search these books for your relative’s name
http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgenweb/books/index.htm
see your local public library to see these books through the interlibrary loan program.

chronicles of oklahoma and history of indian territory and indian pioneer papers are especially helpful. your family might be mentioned in friends or families’ interviews.
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/contents/v007toc.html
search for your surnames there.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgenweb/pioneer/pioneer.htm
find the volume that would contain your surname and look at the interviews on that page. if the interview you want is not online, request the microfiche from the local church of latter day saints family history center. these are interviews that were done as a wpa
depression-era project and the information in them can be valuable in a genealogy search.
for instance, volume 1, microfiche 6016866, contains surnames between aaron and aldridge, such as aaron, abbot, abbott, abercrombie, adams, etc. some interviews are online.
resources: http://www.hanksville.org/NAresources/
some photos: http://www.rootsweb.com/~okchocta/pioneer_photos.htm
interesting explanation about the different choctaw tribes in the pioneer papers, thomas w. hunter interview. this is on the choctaw county, oklahoma website hosted at rootsweb.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okchocta/ipp/ipp_thomas_w_hunter.htm
eagletown history, pages 70-74. this book also has several other oklahoma place names.
“Ghost Towns of Oklahoma” by John W. Morris
you can look at a copy through interlibrary loan – see your local public library.
historical piece:
http://www.tc.umn.edu/~mboucher/mikebouchweb/choctaw/ctowns.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw
choctaw tribe historical info http://www.everyculture.com/multi/Bu-Dr/Choctaws.html

choctaw marriage customs
http://www.tc.umn.edu/~mboucher/mikebouchweb/choctaw/marr1.htm
http://www.tc.umn.edu/~mboucher/mikebouchweb/choctaw/marr2.htm
general resources for surnames, locations: http://www.cyndislist.com
http://hometown.aol.com/bbbenge/newlinks.html

you can call your local public libraries and ask them if they have a subscription to
ancestry or heritage quest. it’s best if you can find one that has subscriptions for both
databases. i’m using one from a local public library right now.

most genealogy records are 72 years or older. for instance the last census for public
access is 1930. you can have the census bureau look up someone for you, if you are a direct
descendant, but the record won’t be available publicly. you can get records that are not
available to the general public, but you may have to send a copy of your birth certificate
to do so.

many books are available through interlibrary loan. if you see a book that you’d like to
look at, go to your local public library and ask if you can access it through interlibrary
loan. many books are also available on microfilm/microform through the local family history
center at the latter day saints church.

basic knowledge on how to register.

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/howtoregister.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/howtosearch/index.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/howtosearch/page2.htm
http://groups.msn.com/ONEOFMANYFEATHERS/howmuchindianareyou.msnw
If your direct ancestor was an original enrolled on the Dawes Commission Rolls and you apply
for Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood, based on that relationship, you will be required
to furnish certain proof such as birth certificate, death certificate, or judicial
determination of heirs showing relationship to the nearest lineal enrolled ancestor. If you
do not know whether your ancestor was enrolled, or the tribe, you must identify your
ancestor and learn where they were living in, Indian Territory in 1900. You can do this by
looking on the 1900 Indian Territory census. Finding them on the census will tell you which
Indian Nation they were living in, and if the person is Indian, identify the tribe. If you
are looking for a tribal member who was not of the Five Civilized Tribes, you should look on
the 1900 Oklahoma Territory for your ancestor, then check with Tribal Headquarters or the
tribal rolls in the Oklahoma State Historical Society. The Dawes Commission Roll Books are
also available at the Oklahoma State Historical Society.

Some people may never be able to prove Indian heritage. Indian law usually dictated that
“when any citizen shall remove with his effects out of the limits of the Nation and become a
citizen of any other government, all his rights and privileges as a citizen of the Nation
shall cease, provided nevertheless that the National Council shall have power to re-admit
any such person who may at any time desire to return to the Nation, but no one is entitled
as an inherent right to re-admission to citizenship. If an applicant proves that at one time
he was a recognized citizen of the Nation and has forfeited that citizenship, there is no
law by which he can demand admission. As a matter of course, the same laws and usages
governed the Dawes commission in their consideration of claims to citizenship For the most
part Indian agents only kept track of persons who were recognized as tribal members (either
by the Federal government or the Tribal government). People who remained behind when the
bulk of their tribe was moved by the Federal Government, or people who moved away from the
tribe and in effect ended their affiliation with it, will probably be lost as far as
official BIA records are concerned. You will have to find these people using the basic
genealogical methods of putting the families in the proper place and time period, and
studying the history of the area; talking to family members, asking for family Bible
information, marriage records, birth records and census records.

Even if you do not prove your Indian Ancestry you will have made a significant contribution
to your family history, and that is a worthy effort.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~itgenweb/

indian territory:
map: http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgenweb/maps/images/okinterrmap.gif

marriage applications:
http://members.tripod.com/~mccurtain_2/marriages/marriageindex.html
choctaw marriages: http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/kinard.htm

where to find the applications:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgarvin/kinard/chocmarriageindex.htm
from mccurtain genealogical society:

http://members..tripod.com/~mccurtain_2/index.html
http://www.okhistory.org/res/marriagerecords.htm

this webpage shows you how to notate your family’s genealogy:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/pushmataha.html
it’s a fairly classic format.

many links here: http://www.genealinks.com/states/ok.htm
several choctaw history links:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/

http://www.rootsweb.com/~okpushma/
http://www.sirinet.net/~lgarris/swogs/
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/chronicles/v014/v014p009.html
http://www.talewins.com/OK/native.htm
http://www.cwis.net/~hoytd/LCGHS/index.html
current native american news: http://www.nanews.org/current/
chiefs and codetalkers link:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/people/
also interviews with original settlers.
Most of these inteviews are already part of a copyrighted book, “The Life and Times of the Original Choctaw Enrollees”, though I understand that some are not. That copyright is also held by the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. For purposes of citation, you should cite the url if you are not actually reading the book. Are you needing the name of the interviewer, or perhaps the dates that the interviews took place? Some of that material is available in the book. You can purchase it through the Choctaw Bookstore at
http://www.choctawschool.com/store/detail.aspx?ID=24
additional interviews. you can search for keywords or names.
http://digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/pioneer/
http://www.okgenweb.org/pioneer/pioneer.htm see the “about” to get copies/access.

MOWA natives: http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
The MOWA band of Choctaw Indians occupies an area in south Washington County and north Mobile County near the southwest Alabama towns of Citronelle, Mount Vernon, and McIntosh. The band takes their name from the first two letters of Mobile and Washington counties, where members settled, straddling the county line. The group was formally recognized as a tribe by Alabama in 1979, but has not received recognition from the federal government, despite tribal members’ efforts.
http://mowachoctaw.org/

Jena Band of Choctaw Indians
Brief Historical Summary

The earliest recorded notice of the Choctaw Indians is believed to be about 1540, in the area of southern Mississippi and in the early 1700s near present-day Mobile, Alabama, Biloxi, Mississippi, and New Orleans, Louisiana. Inland from these settlements there was a large tribe of Muskogean speaking people occupying about 60 towns on the streams that formed the headwaters of the Pascagoula and Pearl Rivers.

After the relinquishment of the Louisiana Colony by France, members of the tribe began to move across the Mississippi River. By the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek in September of 1830 the main body of the Choctaw ceded all their land east of the Mississippi river. The Choctaw began to migrate even further away from their original territory. One band settled in a sizable village near present-day Enterprise, Louisiana and other groups migrated to the pine covered hills of what was then Catahoula Parish in Louisiana. Eventually the Choctaw, located between present day Monroe and Natchitoches, Louisiana, joined the group in Catahoula Parish. Principle settlements were established on Trout Creek in LaSalle Parish and Bear Creek in Grant Parish.
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

marriages:
http://www..rootsweb.com/~okgenweb/pioneer/pioneer.htm
http://marti.rootsweb.com/okmarr/marriage.htm
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/chronicles/v006/v006p299.html
http://www.okhistory.org/res/marriagerecords.htm

native census records: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/census2/index.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/census/index.htm
native land patents:
http://www.cyndislist.com/ok.htm
i don’t search these. you should search them yourself.

http://www.rootsweb.com has surname messageboards, geographic, tribal messageboards.
check the webprojects for surname, tribe and location. http://www.genealogy.com has surname
messageboards. rootsweb has email lists for all their messageboards also. and there’s a
newbie email list, where you can get answers to your questions about how to do genealogy.
if you get information from other people or the internet, be cautious. i have found several
postings to be wrong and erroneous information often gets copied several times on the
internet.
a native messageboard: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/queries/index.htm

if you could give more information, such as middle name, children and/or parents and/or
siblings, dates and state of birth, states lived in, you would have more success in
searching for your ancestors. please type accurately because an inaccuracy might cause
anyone who helps you to discard the correct information. if you are uncertain of anything,
use a ? beside the uncertain information.

natives often took names of places or people they liked as surnames. don’t assume that
their surname goes back further than the 1800’s. you may have to work with native american
names in the 1800’s. also, natives didn’t view names as being permanent identifiers, so
even the native american names can change over time. look very closely at the family
members, because sometimes that is the best way to identify them.

in the case of slaves, many times they also took place names or “slaveowner” surnames.
freedmen resource: http://www.african-nativeamerican.com/

genealogy is a long-term project. the idea with genealogy is to start with what you know,
tell your sources in any post, try to give as complete information as you can. then work
backwards. document as you go. write for your parents, grandparents birth certificates,
death certificates and accumulate genealogy info as you go. census information is
considered primary information because it was accumulated at the time, not changed later by
bad memories, etc.

i have done genealogy for several people and a little for my husband’s family, who were choctaws. so i’m familiar with the vocabulary of native genealogy.

these pages might be helpful: how to register for the tribe:

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/howtoregister.htm
http://www.us-census.org/pub-ftp/na/5c-tribes/dawes-index/pg001-022.txt
http://www.us-census.org/pub-ftp/
na/5c-tribes/dawes-index/
this is the official transcription page by page. you must look through each page, but you can skip to the area where you would find your surname, once on the page. they are in rough alphabetical form for each page. if you are less certain about the spelling of the surname, this might be the best resource.

http://www.us-census.org/native/5_civlilized_tribes.html
(these people could use transcription help also. they are trying to put all the records on
line and have broken the projects down.)
http://www.cyndislist.com

how to search for information:

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/howtosearch/index.htm and rootsweb has an email list
for people new to genealogy. remember, the only stupid question is the one you don’t ask.
it’s a general email list for people having an interest in genealogy that are just learning.
you can sign up for these email lists free. if i were you, i’d sign up for some regional
lists about where your ancestors were located and the newbie lists and the surname lists. i
get my email lists in digest form, which means i get one a day, if someone posts to it. if
people post frequently to the list, i still get only one email a day.
RootsWeb Review – Our weekly e-zine
ROOTS-L – The first and largest genealogy list
Gen-Newbie – For Internet and genealogy newbies

http://lists.rootsweb.com/

re: heritage
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/contents/v014toc.html
and there’s also a search function
http://college.hmco.com/history/readerscomp/naind/html/na_007300_choctaw.htm
http://members.aol.com/ciiisiii/cherokeepage/cherokee2.htm
http://www.indianscoutbooks.com/catalog-choctaw.htm
http://www.archaeolink.com/choctaw_indians.htm
http://www.kidinfo.com/American_History/Native_Americans.html

http://www.rootsweb.com/~okchocta/estates/book1_index.htm
this book might contain family members in the wills, useful for establishing relationships.
mississippi choctaw tribe:
http://www.choctaw.org/
http://www.uga..edu/~toli/information/Choctaw.html
http://www.kshs.org/genealogists/culture_ethnic/Native%20American/dawes.htm
you can look at the enrollment cards through interlibrary loan. check with your local library.

http://www.natchezbelle.org/ahgp-ms/removal/index.htm#menu

http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/v009/v009p027.html
use the search all volumes to search for particular families or names.

proposed legislation:
http://matte.accessgenealogy.com/mowa_acknowledgement.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/books/choctaw/index.htm
mississippi choctaw in louisiana

the mississippi choctaw were choctaw that didn’t move when the federal government instructed
them. as a result, they were not allowed to be enrolled in the choctaw tribe in oklahoma, even if they moved later. the choctaw tribe required that people be registered in oklahoma and have resided there by 1900. the mississippi choctaw were choctaw but the federal government designated the split. the mississippi choctaw said they were too poor to move to go on the trail of tears journey (1830-1850). the mississippi choctaw now have recognition and each tribe has separate enrollment requirements.

the census records that may be viewed are up to 1930, grouped by state. the native american applications were mostly taken in the 1892-1896 for choctaws. i would suggest that you start with census records with what you know (last ancestor that you can identify by name) and work backwards (their parents). often local libraries have subscriptions to ancestry or heritage quest or both.

you will need to collect birth certificates from the counties/states where people were born to prove relationship. so you can write me again with what you know, and i will look for you. in the meantime, gather your parent’s birth certificates and work back. if you don’t know where someone was born, you can try a social security index and send away for their file. hopefully, someone will have been in the military, because they kept records on marriages, children, places, etc. as long as you have a direct descent, you should be able to access records.

you could use http://www.rootsweb.com and put in your last known ancestor’s name and see what information might be there. it could give you email addresses to write, states/locations/birthdates, social security #’s, spouse names.

if these clues don’t help you, you can try posting an email message to the
geographic, tribe or surname email lists. check here for that:

http://lists.rootsweb.com/ or http://www.genealogy.com
get on the choctaw email list and search the archives of that mailing list
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/mail/choctaw.htm
http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=board&r=rw&p=topics.ethnic.natam.intertribal.al
http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=board&r=rw&p=topics.ethnic.natam.nations.choctaw.choctawnat
http://www.cousinconnect.com
armstrong rolls, 1830: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/armstrong.php
dawes rolls, 1896-1902: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
criminal cases 1866-1900: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/fortsmith.php
mississippi choctaw census 1929: http://ccharity.com/census/choctawcensus3.htm not in perfect alphabetical order
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/cooper/index.htm clans
other census records: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/rolls.htm

other resources: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~impson/new_page_3.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/rolls.htm

mississippi choctaw should read this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw

books to access: http://members.aol.com/TMCorner/indn_c_c.htm
try interlibrary loan to see if the book interests you. see your local public library for
that.
Choctaw Nation:

3260011 Choctaw of Mississippi 1929-1932N, Census Records with birth and death
records from 1924-1932., Bowen, 138pp $35.00

3260014 Mississippi Choctaw Census, this record has birth, death, and marriage
records from 1933-1939., Bowen, 107pp $33.00

11024 Indian Treaties: Choctaw, Indian treaties are the backbone for most records
that have historical and genealogical significance. This publication is indexed.,
Kappler, 1991, 90pp $25.00

land claims http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:field(DOCID+lit(sp0344)):

more books that might be useful. try interlibrary loan at your local public library
or a family history center with the latter day saints:
http://hometown.aol.com/bbbenge/page12.html
The Memorabilia Corner
Genealogical, Historical and Archival Supplies
1312 McKinley Avenue
Norman, Oklahoma 73072-6535
(USA) 405-321-8366
(FAX) 405-321-3444
TMCorner@aol.com

http://www.nanations.com/choctaw/

dawes rolls: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalrolls/index.htm
Each index entry gives an