Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

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Tracing heritage and attempting to become a Choctaw member

Liz Liz

posted on August 24, 2011

I am currently tracing the heritage for my boss, Dan Dunn, to help him get his tribal membership. Just recently, it was discovered that his great grandparents were located in the 1902 Choctaw Dawes rolls…
Johnny Mahan 4 years old (great-grandfather)
Pauline Bell 12 years old (great-grandmother)
Dan’s grandmother (Rosietta B. Dunn) was born on June 17, 1918 in San Springs, OK. She died on December 26, 1989. She was married to Everette Dunn. Dan believes that his Native American Heritage comes from his maternal side.
Dan was born on January 10, 1955 in Campbell, CA.
Where do I go from here? How can Dan become a member? Is he eligible? Any help is greatly appreciated.

attached:

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on August 25, 2011

he is eligible for tribal membership if he is directly related to an original enrollee. there are links to the dawes roll, the enrollees and the tribe’s forms under department, community services on this link.
http://www.choctawnation.com/services/departments/

if others in his family have been enrolled, he would have to submit birth certificates, marriage licenses down to the common ancestor. if none have applied and he is eligible, he would have to submit all documents down to the original enrollee.

no card# or enrollment # was in your post, so i have to guess about what was found. the card# is the family group. you may not have checked to see what the codes mean.
p-parent

this is an index only. you can write for the census card, enrollment application, testimony. three possible sources would be the oklahoma historical society, NARA/national archives and records administration http:www.archives.gov fort worth, TX office, and footnote.com. the link on access genealogy for this family group indicates footnote does have the record online and it would be cheaper to pay for a month’s access than to purchase the record from the other sources.

is this the family that was found on the dawes roll?
Dawes Card Information
tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Allen Alfred 0 M MCR1950 P
Choctaw Allen Emily 0 F MCR1950 P
Choctaw Barnes Obediah 0 M MCR1950 P
Choctaw Coe Rebecca D 0 F MCR1950 P
Choctaw Mahan Floyd 2 M 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Johnny 4 M 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Viola 5 F 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Lulu 7 F 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Tom 9 M 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Fred 13 M 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Willie 15 F 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Pearl 17 F 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Laura 41 F 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
Choctaw Mahan Adam 65 M 1/2 MCR1950 NR MCR
MCR=mississippi choctaw refused.

Dawes Card Information
tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Ahbetonubbee 0 M MCR5085 P
Choctaw Bell Charley 0 M MCR5085 P
Choctaw Bell Pauline 12 F 15/1 MCR5085 COFFADELIAH MS MCR
Choctaw Bell Buddy 14 M 15/1 MCR5085 COFFADELIAH MS MCR
Choctaw Bell Omichee 48 F FULL MCR5085 2151 COFFADELIAH MS MCR
Choctaw Bell Smith 48 M 7/8 MCR5085 COFFADELIAH MS MCR

so it appears that both sides of the family are mississippi choctaw. this is not a great surprise to me as often mississippi choctaw married with others in that particular tribe. but it probably means that his family were not enrolled in the choctaw tribe in oklahoma.

this is the oklahoma historical society link for the original enrollees.
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906. it consists of the names of applicants that applied to the five major tribes. so, not all of the people named on the dawes roll were accepted as tribal members. so this is the first thing to check. there is a link to the oklahoma historical society dawes roll so that you can search for a particular name.

heritage and tribal enrollment are different topics. enrollment was controversial at the time. some people didn’t qualify for enrollment according to the enrollment rules, some people were philosophically opposed to enrollment. at the time, some candidates even ran on platforms against the procedures and against enrollment.

a few mississippi choctaw were enrolled by choctaw council permission early in the process. however, most mississippi choctaw were not enrolled in the choctaw tribe of oklahoma.

there is a possibility that the family was enrolled in other tribes in oklahoma or in reservations in the southeastern united states. geographic location is a key to looking for tribal affiliation. there are federally recognized tribes and state recognized tribes and still, even tribes trying to get recognized.

the mississippi choctaw were natives that did not go on the trail of tears in the late 1830’s, and they were often given land in lieu of enrollment. in order to check for choctaw scrip land, someone would have to trace their ancestors down to the 1830-1880 time period and look for the choctaw scrip land record. this would show affiliation but not necessarily tribal membership. the mississippi choctaw achieved recogition about 1930’s. there are also other tribes that lived nearby, such as the MOWA and eastern cherokee. anyway, as i said, geographic location is the key to finding a tribal affiliation, generally.

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

start with what you know, gather documentation, then you can go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates and marriage license and then you can start on your grandparents. if someone passed away after 1/1/1937, they probably have a social security application on file. if you ask a government for a birth certificate, and they were born before 1929, they might have submitted a delayed birth certificate. death certificates, cemetery information and obituaries are helpful. you can usually get a copy of an obituary, newspaper mentions such as birth of a child or marriage, through the interlibrary loan program – see your local public library for this. i usually start with the death and work toward the person’s birth. military records and pension records can be helpful. census records can tell you where they were at particular times. the census records up to 1930 are available, although the 1890 census was largely destroyed. the 1940 census will be public information in 2012.

social security application for a deceased person:
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/html/foia_guide.htm

first of all, heritage and tribal enrollment are two different things. many times natives didn’t apply for enrollment because 1) they didn’t qualify, 2) they were philosophically opposed to enrollment, 3) they didn’t have documentation, or 4) they were mississippi choctaw and their ancestor had accepted land or benefits in lieu of tribal enrollment.

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906, so you should trace your ancestors down to that time period. mostly, they had to be living in oklahoma by that time and agree to live there permanently.

helpful information about tribal enrollment
http://www.felihkatubbe.com/ChoctawNation/TribalMembership.html

2 ways to search:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
this will let you enter partial names to get card#. click on the card# in the card column and you can see other names in that family.
other resources on the left and at the bottom of this webpage. native census records and databases are especially useful.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/index.php
this will give you card# (family group) and enrollment #. they have some native marriage records too. other oklahoma records listed at left.
if the name is common, you may find too many possible records.
http://okhistory.cuadra.com/star/public.html

the tribe has an excellent information to help you. it is found under genealogy advocacy.
http://choctawnation.com/services/departments/community-services/

NARA http://www.archives.gov/ federal records repository. the fort worth, TX office has archives for oklahoma and texas tribes. atlanta/morrow office has archives for the southwest tribes. many offices have microfilmed records for several tribes. note that this web address has changed recently from nara.gov.

freedmen info:
You can ONLY apply for Choctaw Nation Membership, AFTER you have obtained a CDIB card proving your Choctaw Blood lineage to a direct ancestor who actually enrolled, BY BLOOD. Freedmen DID NOT enroll By Blood. When US Congress closed the Final Dawes Commission Rolls, there were no provisions granting Freedmen any benefits after the Dawes Commission closed. The tribe Constitution states BY BLOOD. however, the documents (application, census card and testimony) may help you find out more about your heritage.

mississippi choctaw and choctaw tribe explained here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Trail_of_Tears

http://www.choctaw.org/

jena choctaw tribe in louisiana:
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

MOWA tribe
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
http://www.uab.edu/uabmagazine/2009/july/losttribe
http://www.native-american-online.org/MOWA-Choctaw.htm
MOWA Band Of Choctaws Wilford Taylor 1080 Red Fox Road Mount Vernon, AL 36560 (251) 829-5500. E-Mail: chieftaylor@mowachoctaw.com

other choctaw tribes: http://www.aaanativearts.com/choctaw-indians/index.html

chickasaw historical society 22
Historic Preservation and
Repatriation Office
Phone: (580) 272-5325
Fax: (580) 272-5327
2020 E. Arlington, Suite 4, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

chickasaw tribe
Chickasaw Nation Headquarters
520 East Arlington, Ada, OK 74820
Phone (580) 436-2603
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821
http://www.chickasaw.net/index.htm

chickasaw genealogy archive center 23
Tribal Library
Phone: (580) 310-6477
Fax: (580) 559-0773
1003 Chamber Loop, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

http://www.okhistory.org/
oklahoma historical society

texas tribes
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm

oklahoma tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm
http://www.cowboy.net/native/tribes.html

some links for the choctaw.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
i looked at the land records and those need a lot of work. i have no information about whether or when they will improve some of these categories.

types of records available for native americans:
pages 366-369 in particular although the entire native american chapter is helpful.
The Genealogist’s Companion and Sourcebook:
Guide to the Resources You Need for Unpuzzling Your Past
Emily Anne Croom
you can ask for these particular pages from your local public library. if they don’t have the book, you can get the pages through the interlibrary loan program.
native american records are discussed in pages 352-386.

Tracing ancestors among the Five Civilized Tribes: Southeastern Indians …
By Rachal Mills Lennon
this book could be accessed through the interlibary loan program also.

always find the state archives. some records are online, some records are not. but many times you can find a record not found in other places. you want to see also about newspaper mentions for obituaries, births, marriages in particular.

check courts for probate, civil and criminal cases, marriage records.

if your ancestors lived on a reservation, they might not appear on a federal census because they were not taxed.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
1860 census, indian territory.

this book is a good read about the dawes roll and how they implemented it.
The Dawes Commission and the allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914
By Kent Carter

good advice about native research:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research2.html

if your relatives came from a different geographic location or belonged to a different tribe, try searching google for the state and tribes. you might find a contact for a state-recognized tribe or a federal recognized tribe.

this page can help you set up a targeted google search.
http://www.searchforancestors.com/google/searcher.html

these searches will combine several possible search terms and give you the best matches.

i have collected many resources over the years. if you want to write to me, shamlet76@gmail.com and request the choctaw resource list, i will be glad to send it to you.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

Milton Z. Brown Milton Z. Brown

posted on July 9, 2012

I have more info for you about Dan’s great-grandfather, Johnny Mahan. His mother was Laura Allen, and her parents were Alfred Allen and Emily Robinson. Emily was from Meridian, Mississippi. Alfred and Emily had 13 children, many of whom moved to Enterprise and Shubuta. I have more info on them. Contact me if you want me to send it to you. My email address is miltonzbrown AT gmail dot com

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on August 30, 2012 and updated on August 30, 2012

I’m a descendant of a Choctaw Freedman and a full blood Choctaw. The treaty after the Civil War gave the freedmen and their descendants full citizenship into the Nation. Will I encounter any resistance if I were to excerise this claim?

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on August 30, 2012

this paragraph was drafted by the tribe about freedman status in the tribe:

freedmen info:
You can ONLY apply for Choctaw Nation Membership, AFTER you have obtained a CDIB card proving your Choctaw Blood lineage to a direct ancestor who actually enrolled, BY BLOOD. Freedmen DID NOT enroll By Blood. When US Congress closed the Final Dawes Commission Rolls, there were no provisions granting Freedmen any benefits after the Dawes Commission closed. The tribe Constitution states BY BLOOD. however, the documents (application, census card and testimony) may help you find out more about your heritage.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

Dale Hudson Dale Hudson

posted on August 30, 2012

I have a question… I know from stories about Choctaw and other related tribes are in my direct blood line. I am at a stand point however, because I want to know what I can do to trace it. My father ran away from his home at 16, and before he died he left again to go back to florida. I do not know anyone in his family, or even if they are still living. I know there are a lot of Hudson Choctaw’s, who were priests and chiefs. What information can I give of myself, in order for a search?

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on August 31, 2012

you should first get a copy of his death certificate. this might give you dates, locations and parents. if it doesn’t, then you should get a copy of his birth certificate, using his death certificate and your birth certificate.

if you get stuck, then get a copy of his social security application.
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/html/foia_guide.htm

genealogy is a process.

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

start with what you know, gather documentation, then you can go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates and marriage license and then you can start on your grandparents. if someone passed away after 1/1/1937, they probably have a social security application on file. if you ask a government agency for a birth certificate, and they were born before 1929, they might have submitted a delayed birth certificate. death certificates, cemetery information and obituaries are helpful. you can usually get a copy of an obituary, newspaper mentions such as birth of a child or marriage, through the interlibrary loan program – see your local public library for this. i usually start with the death and work toward the person’s birth. military records and pension records can be helpful. census records can tell you where they were at particular times, names of family members. the census records up to 1940 are available, although the 1890 census was largely destroyed.

obituaries through the oklahoma choctaw tribe is through the history link for the tribe:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/

social security application for a deceased person:
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/html/foia_guide.htm
form SS-5.

your public library probably has a subscription to heritage quest and ancestry.com. fold3.com is another useful database for native records and military records, but they are a subscription. however, many times their month’s subscription price is less than the price of a dawes packet, however check with accessgenealogy’s database to see if your relative’s dawes packet is exists or is available at fold3.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/dawes.php?s_last=green&s_first=mart&s_middle=&s_tribe=
partial names are allowed.

bear in mind that many records are not online. always collect documents, as just the reference to a relative in an index informs you that a document is available.

death records:
death certificate: state vital records or if very old, state archives. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. you can look at death indices, such as the social security death index 1964-present for a date of death on rootsweb.com or ancestry.com.
obituary: see your local public library, interlibrary loan program. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. approximate date of death is helpful. if old, state historical society or state archives might have historical newspapers.
cemetery record: try findagrave.com or interment.net. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. if you find a relative, you can click on the county or cemetery to see if others with the same surname are buried there.

marriage records:
state vital records office, county clerk or if old, state archives or state historical society.

birth records:
state vital records office, or if old, state archives or state historical society. if the birth was before 1940, ask for a birth certificate or a delayed birth certificate. many people had to get delayed birth certificates when social security came into effect because they had to show proof of age. this will be under the name used at the time of birth.

census records:
you will want to search for census records 1940 on down to the birth of your relative. the federal census was taken every 10 years, however the 1890 census was largely destroyed by fire. there are also some state census records and native census records and native rolls. ancestry.com and heritage quest are two databases that include many census records. many native census records kept by NARA (http://www.archives.gov) are transcribed at accessgenealogy.

first of all, heritage and tribal enrollment are two different things. many times natives didn’t apply for enrollment because 1) they didn’t qualify, 2) they were philosophically opposed to enrollment, 3) they didn’t have documentation, or 4) they were mississippi choctaw and their ancestor had accepted land or benefits in lieu of tribal enrollment.

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906, so you should trace your ancestors down to that time period. mostly, they had to be living in oklahoma by that time and agree to live there permanently.

history of the dawes roll
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Act
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Commission
wikipedia entries are sometimes opinionated; entered by volunteers.

helpful information about tribal enrollment
http://www.felihkatubbe.com/ChoctawNation/TribalMembership.html

2 ways to search:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
this will let you enter partial names to get card#. click on the card# in the card column and you can see other names in that family.
other resources on the left and at the bottom of this webpage. native census records and databases are especially useful.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/index.php
this will give you card# (family group) and enrollment #. they have some native marriage records too. other oklahoma records listed at left.
if your relative was enrolled by court action, their name might not be on this list.
if the name is common, you may find too many possible records.
you can order the dawes packet from the oklahoma historical society website.

if you find a relative listed on the dawes roll, fold3 may have filmed the record and could be available online.
http://www.fold3.com/documents/46580455/dawes-packets/
other resources are NARA http://www.archives.gov

the five civilized tribes book put out by the department of the interior has testimony.
http://books.google.com/books/about/Five_civilized_tribes_in_Oklahoma.html?id=chATAAAAYAAJ
and you can read it online

and these are the microfilms at fort worth TX archives.
http://www.archives.gov/southwest/finding-aids/native-american-microfilm.html

there may be additional records about your relative:
contact NARA http://www.archives.gov for these and other records listed on this webpage.

75.23 RECORDS OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES 1852-1919
75.23.1 Records of the Dawes Commission
75.23.2 Records of the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory
75.23.3 General records of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes
http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/075.html
(Record Group 75)
1793-1989

http://okhistory.cuadra.com/star/public.html
oklahoma newspaper and archives search. some of these resources may be available through interlibrary loan/public library.

the tribe has an excellent information to help you. it is found under genealogy advocacy.
http://choctawnation.com/services/departments/community-services/
some obituaries:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/obituaries/

NARA http://www.archives.gov/ federal records repository. the fort worth, TX office has archives for oklahoma and texas tribes. atlanta/morrow office has archives for the southwest tribes. many offices have microfilmed records for several tribes. note that this web address has changed recently from nara.gov.

freedmen info:
You can ONLY apply for Choctaw Nation Membership, AFTER you have obtained a CDIB card proving your Choctaw Blood lineage to a direct ancestor who actually enrolled, BY BLOOD. Freedmen DID NOT enroll By Blood. When US Congress closed the Final Dawes Commission Rolls, there were no provisions granting Freedmen any benefits after the Dawes Commission closed. The tribe Constitution states BY BLOOD. however, the documents (application, census card and testimony) may help you find out more about your heritage.

about blood quantum laws:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_quantum_laws
calculations about blood quantum:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wishawa4/Menominee%20Indians/quantum.htm

mississippi choctaw and choctaw tribe explained here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Trail_of_Tears
http://www.choctaw.org/

jena choctaw tribe in louisiana:
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

MOWA tribe
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
http://www.uab.edu/uabmagazine/2009/july/losttribe
http://www.native-american-online.org/MOWA-Choctaw.htm
MOWA Band Of Choctaws Wilford Taylor 1080 Red Fox Road Mount Vernon, AL 36560 (251) 829-5500. E-Mail: chieftaylor@mowachoctaw.com

other choctaw tribes:
http://www.aaanativearts.com/choctaw-indians/index.html

chickasaw historical society
Historic Preservation and Repatriation Office
Phone: (580) 272-5325
Fax: (580) 272-5327
2020 E. Arlington, Suite 4, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

chickasaw tribe
Chickasaw Nation Headquarters
520 East Arlington, Ada, OK 74820
Phone (580) 436-2603
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821
http://www.chickasaw.net/index.htm

chickasaw genealogy archive center Tribal Library
Phone: (580) 310-6477
Fax: (580) 559-0773
1003 Chamber Loop, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

http://www.okhistory.org/
oklahoma historical society
marriage records
http://www.okhistory.org/research/library/marriage.html
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/chocmarriageindex.htm

other historical societies:
http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/SH-OK-NDX.html
some oklahoma genealogical societies:
http://www.censusfinder.com/oklahoma-genealogy-society.htm
http://www.geneasearch.com/societies/socokla.htm

texas tribes
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm

oklahoma tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm
http://www.cowboy.net/native/tribes.html

some links for the choctaw.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
i looked at the land records and those need a lot of work. i have no information about whether or when they will improve some of these categories.

types of records available for native americans:
pages 366-369 in particular although the entire native american chapter is helpful.
The Genealogist’s Companion and Sourcebook:
Guide to the Resources You Need for Unpuzzling Your Past
Emily Anne Croom
you can ask for these particular pages from your local public library. if they don’t have the book, you can get the pages through the interlibrary loan program.
native american records are discussed in pages 352-386.

Tracing ancestors among the Five Civilized Tribes: Southeastern Indians …
By Rachal Mills Lennon
this book could be accessed through the interlibary loan program also.

always find the state archives. some records are online, some records are not. but many times you can find a record not found in other places. you want to see also about newspaper mentions for obituaries, births, marriages in particular.

check courts for probate, civil and criminal cases, marriage records.

if your ancestors lived on a reservation, they might not appear on a federal census because they were not taxed.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
1860 census, indian territory.

this book is a good read about the dawes roll and how they implemented it.
The Dawes Commission and the allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914
By Kent Carter
and you can read this book online. your relatives’ testimony might be in the book.
http://www.archive.org/details/fivecivilizedtr00statgoog
see the menu at left. you can download it.
you should look at the enrollment application, census card and testimony. this post will tell you how to do that. these documents will tell you more about your heritage, but it won’t help you if your goal is to be enrolled in the choctaw tribe of oklahoma. some people were classed as mississippi choctaw if the family had a native heritage but didn’t qualify for enrollment in the tribe.

there are 63 tribes in oklahoma but only the five major tribes are on the dawes roll. look at your family’s location around 1900-1930 time period (census will help you there) and see if there was a tribe located nearby. it is possible that your relatives were affiliated with another tribe.

if they were mississippi choctaw, there is probably a land grant in MS/AL to a head of household called choctaw scrip land. this was given in lieu of tribal enrollment 1830-1880 time period. ancestry.com has a database of the MS and AL choctaw scrip land records, called mississippi or alabama land records. there are other land records in those databases too,, so you have to look at the authority/source cited. NARA http://www.archives.gov has those land record packages.

the mississippi choctaw was not removed from oklahoma. but they were largely rejected for tribal enrollment.

this website might help you in your search. some people are trying to transcribe applications.
http://www.us-census.org/native/choctaw_dawes.html
i do not know what they are trying to transcribe, but this is the volunteer page
http://www.us-census.org/states/graphics/status.htm

and this might be of interest to you:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/choctaw/rights-of-choctaws.htm
Rights of Mississippi Choctaws in the Choctaw Nation

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalrolls/
Index to the Final Rolls of the Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory
the dawes roll is composed of applications to the five major tribes in oklahoma.

good advice about native research:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research2.html

if your relatives came from a different geographic location or belonged to a different tribe, try searching google for the state and tribes. you might find a contact for a state-recognized tribe or a federal recognized tribe.

this page can help you set up a targeted google search.
http://www.searchforancestors.com/google/searcher.html

penny postcards. this is a website that features pictures that were on postcards. click on the state to see the postcards that they have.
http://www.usgwarchives.org/special/ppcs/ppcs.html
if you have a penny postcard, you can click on submissions to add your penny postcard to the collection.

these searches will combine several possible search terms and give you the best matches.

i have collected many resources over the years. if you want to write to me, shamlet76@gmail.com and request the choctaw resource list, i will be glad to send it to you.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on September 7, 2012 and updated on September 7, 2012

I saw my great grandfather, Aaron Williams; my great great grandparents, Charley and Milinda Radford-Williams( card number F299), and my 3Great Grandfater, Abram Radford(F265) on the rolls. Where do I go from here?

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on September 7, 2012

it depends on where you want to go. you have placed this inquiry on someone else’s family line, so others might not see it.

i don’t know how to answer your question: where do i go from here? what are you trying to do? if you want heritage information for your family, the dawes application, census card and testimony may help you. if you are trying to enroll in the tribe, it is doubtful that you can do it as your ancestors were enrolled as freedmen.

a website which might help you with research.
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ewyatt/_borders/

http://www.oursharedfamilyhistory.com/resources/helppg.html
this website has a link to the oklahoma pioneer papers.
http://digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/pioneer/
this is a better link

Dawes Card Information

tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Dibell Jim 0 M F278 O
Choctaw Folsom Henry 0 M F278 O
Choctaw Radford Abe 0 M F278 P
Choctaw Radford Betsy 0 F F278 P
Choctaw Williams Arron 11 M F278 421 DOAKVILLE F
Choctaw Williams Levi 13 M F278 420 DOAKVILLE F
Choctaw Williams Sanders 15 M F278 419 DOAKVILLE F
Choctaw Williams Ben 20 M F278 418 DOAKVILLE F
Choctaw Williams Malindy 44 F F278 417 DOAKVILLE F
Choctaw Williams Charley 53 M F278 DOAKVILLE F

hese letters can appear both on Type and Roll number
A – Adopted
AD- Adopted Delaware
D – Doubtful or denied
F – Freedman
FD – Freedman, doubtful or denied
FM – Freedman, minor
FRR – Freedman, rejected IW – Intermarried White
MCR – Mississippi Choctaw Rejected
NR – Not Registered, Non Resident
O – Owner*
OS – Old Series** Old Settler
P – Parent

the freedmen were not enrolled with choctaw blood.
the card # is the family group.

this paragraph was composed by the tribe about freedmen:

freedmen info:
You can ONLY apply for Choctaw Nation Membership, AFTER you have obtained a CDIB card proving your Choctaw Blood lineage to a direct ancestor who actually enrolled, BY BLOOD. Freedmen DID NOT enroll By Blood. When US Congress closed the Final Dawes Commission Rolls, there were no provisions granting Freedmen any benefits after the Dawes Commission closed. The tribe Constitution states BY BLOOD. however, the documents (application, census card and testimony) may help you find out more about your heritage.

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

start with what you know, gather documentation, then you can go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates and marriage license and then you can start on your grandparents. if someone passed away after 1/1/1937, they probably have a social security application on file. if you ask a government agency for a birth certificate, and they were born before 1929, they might have submitted a delayed birth certificate. death certificates, cemetery information and obituaries are helpful. you can usually get a copy of an obituary, newspaper mentions such as birth of a child or marriage, through the interlibrary loan program – see your local public library for this. i usually start with the death and work toward the person’s birth. military records and pension records can be helpful. census records can tell you where they were at particular times, names of family members. the census records up to 1940 are available, although the 1890 census was largely destroyed.

obituaries through the oklahoma choctaw tribe is through the history link for the tribe:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/

social security application for a deceased person:
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/html/foia_guide.htm
form SS-5.

your public library probably has a subscription to heritage quest and ancestry.com. fold3.com is another useful database for native records and military records, but they are a subscription. however, many times their month’s subscription price is less than the price of a dawes packet, however check with accessgenealogy’s database to see if your relative’s dawes packet is exists or is available at fold3.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/dawes.php?s_last=green&s_first=mart&s_middle=&s_tribe=
partial names are allowed.

bear in mind that many records are not online. always collect documents, as just the reference to a relative in an index informs you that a document is available.

death records:
death certificate: state vital records or if very old, state archives. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. you can look at death indices, such as the social security death index 1964-present for a date of death on rootsweb.com or ancestry.com.
obituary: see your local public library, interlibrary loan program. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. approximate date of death is helpful. if old, state historical society or state archives might have historical newspapers.
cemetery record: try findagrave.com or interment.net. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. if you find a relative, you can click on the county or cemetery to see if others with the same surname are buried there.

marriage records:
state vital records office, county clerk or if old, state archives or state historical society.

birth records:
state vital records office, or if old, state archives or state historical society. if the birth was before 1940, ask for a birth certificate or a delayed birth certificate. many people had to get delayed birth certificates when social security came into effect because they had to show proof of age. this will be under the name used at the time of birth.

census records:
you will want to search for census records 1940 on down to the birth of your relative. the federal census was taken every 10 years, however the 1890 census was largely destroyed by fire. there are also some state census records and native census records and native rolls. ancestry.com and heritage quest are two databases that include many census records. many native census records kept by NARA (http://www.archives.gov) are transcribed at accessgenealogy.

first of all, heritage and tribal enrollment are two different things. many times natives didn’t apply for enrollment because 1) they didn’t qualify, 2) they were philosophically opposed to enrollment, 3) they didn’t have documentation, or 4) they were mississippi choctaw and their ancestor had accepted land or benefits in lieu of tribal enrollment.

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906, so you should trace your ancestors down to that time period. mostly, they had to be living in oklahoma by that time and agree to live there permanently.

history of the dawes roll
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Act
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Commission
wikipedia entries are sometimes opinionated; entered by volunteers.

helpful information about tribal enrollment
http://www.felihkatubbe.com/ChoctawNation/TribalMembership.html

2 ways to search:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
this will let you enter partial names to get card#. click on the card# in the card column and you can see other names in that family.
other resources on the left and at the bottom of this webpage. native census records and databases are especially useful.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/index.php
this will give you card# (family group) and enrollment #. they have some native marriage records too. other oklahoma records listed at left.
if your relative was enrolled by court action, their name might not be on this list.
if the name is common, you may find too many possible records.
you can order the dawes packet from the oklahoma historical society website.

if you find a relative listed on the dawes roll, fold3 may have filmed the record and could be available online.
http://www.fold3.com/documents/46580455/dawes-packets/
other resources are NARA http://www.archives.gov

the five civilized tribes book put out by the department of the interior has testimony.
http://books.google.com/books/about/Five_civilized_tribes_in_Oklahoma.html?id=chATAAAAYAAJ
and you can read it online

and these are the microfilms at fort worth TX archives.
http://www.archives.gov/southwest/finding-aids/native-american-microfilm.html

there may be additional records about your relative:
contact NARA http://www.archives.gov for these and other records listed on this webpage.

75.23 RECORDS OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES 1852-1919
75.23.1 Records of the Dawes Commission
75.23.2 Records of the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory
75.23.3 General records of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes
http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/075.html
(Record Group 75)
1793-1989

http://okhistory.cuadra.com/star/public.html
oklahoma newspaper and archives search. some of these resources may be available through interlibrary loan/public library.

the tribe has an excellent information to help you. it is found under genealogy advocacy.
http://choctawnation.com/services/departments/community-services/
some obituaries:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/obituaries/

NARA http://www.archives.gov/ federal records repository. the fort worth, TX office has archives for oklahoma and texas tribes. atlanta/morrow office has archives for the southwest tribes. many offices have microfilmed records for several tribes. note that this web address has changed recently from nara.gov.

about blood quantum laws:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_quantum_laws
calculations about blood quantum:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wishawa4/Menominee%20Indians/quantum.htm

mississippi choctaw and choctaw tribe explained here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Trail_of_Tears
http://www.choctaw.org/

jena choctaw tribe in louisiana:
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

MOWA tribe
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
http://www.uab.edu/uabmagazine/2009/july/losttribe
http://www.native-american-online.org/MOWA-Choctaw.htm
MOWA Band Of Choctaws Wilford Taylor 1080 Red Fox Road Mount Vernon, AL 36560 (251) 829-5500. E-Mail: chieftaylor@mowachoctaw.com

other choctaw tribes:
http://www.aaanativearts.com/choctaw-indians/index.html

chickasaw historical society
Historic Preservation and Repatriation Office
Phone: (580) 272-5325
Fax: (580) 272-5327
2020 E. Arlington, Suite 4, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

chickasaw tribe
Chickasaw Nation Headquarters
520 East Arlington, Ada, OK 74820
Phone (580) 436-2603
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821
http://www.chickasaw.net/index.htm

chickasaw genealogy archive center Tribal Library
Phone: (580) 310-6477
Fax: (580) 559-0773
1003 Chamber Loop, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

http://www.okhistory.org/
oklahoma historical society
marriage records
http://www.okhistory.org/research/library/marriage.html
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/chocmarriageindex.htm

other historical societies:
http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/SH-OK-NDX.html
some oklahoma genealogical societies:
http://www.censusfinder.com/oklahoma-genealogy-society.htm
http://www.geneasearch.com/societies/socokla.htm

texas tribes
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm

oklahoma tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm
http://www.cowboy.net/native/tribes.html

some links for the choctaw.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
i looked at the land records and those need a lot of work. i have no information about whether or when they will improve some of these categories.

types of records available for native americans:
pages 366-369 in particular although the entire native american chapter is helpful.
The Genealogist’s Companion and Sourcebook:
Guide to the Resources You Need for Unpuzzling Your Past
Emily Anne Croom
you can ask for these particular pages from your local public library. if they don’t have the book, you can get the pages through the interlibrary loan program.
native american records are discussed in pages 352-386.

Tracing ancestors among the Five Civilized Tribes: Southeastern Indians …
By Rachal Mills Lennon
this book could be accessed through the interlibary loan program also.

always find the state archives. some records are online, some records are not. but many times you can find a record not found in other places. you want to see also about newspaper mentions for obituaries, births, marriages in particular.

check courts for probate, civil and criminal cases, marriage records.

if your ancestors lived on a reservation, they might not appear on a federal census because they were not taxed.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
1860 census, indian territory.

this book is a good read about the dawes roll and how they implemented it.
The Dawes Commission and the allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914
By Kent Carter
and you can read this book online. your relatives’ testimony might be in the book.
http://www.archive.org/details/fivecivilizedtr00statgoog
see the menu at left. you can download it.
you should look at the enrollment application, census card and testimony. this post will tell you how to do that. these documents will tell you more about your heritage, but it won’t help you if your goal is to be enrolled in the choctaw tribe of oklahoma. some people were classed as mississippi choctaw if the family had a native heritage but didn’t qualify for enrollment in the tribe.

there are 63 tribes in oklahoma but only the five major tribes are on the dawes roll. look at your family’s location around 1900-1930 time period (census will help you there) and see if there was a tribe located nearby. it is possible that your relatives were affiliated with another tribe.

if they were mississippi choctaw, there is probably a land grant in MS/AL to a head of household called choctaw scrip land. this was given in lieu of tribal enrollment 1830-1880 time period. ancestry.com has a database of the MS and AL choctaw scrip land records, called mississippi or alabama land records. there are other land records in those databases too,, so you have to look at the authority/source cited. NARA http://www.archives.gov has those land record packages.

the mississippi choctaw was not removed from oklahoma. but they were largely rejected for tribal enrollment.

this website might help you in your search. some people are trying to transcribe applications.
http://www.us-census.org/native/choctaw_dawes.html
i do not know what they are trying to transcribe, but this is the volunteer page
http://www.us-census.org/states/graphics/status.htm

and this might be of interest to you:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/choctaw/rights-of-choctaws.htm
Rights of Mississippi Choctaws in the Choctaw Nation

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalrolls/
Index to the Final Rolls of the Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory
the dawes roll is composed of applications to the five major tribes in oklahoma.

good advice about native research:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research2.html

if your relatives came from a different geographic location or belonged to a different tribe, try searching google for the state and tribes. you might find a contact for a state-recognized tribe or a federal recognized tribe.

this page can help you set up a targeted google search.
http://www.searchforancestors.com/google/searcher.html

penny postcards. this is a website that features pictures that were on postcards. click on the state to see the postcards that they have.
http://www.usgwarchives.org/special/ppcs/ppcs.html
if you have a penny postcard, you can click on submissions to add your penny postcard to the collection.

these searches will combine several possible search terms and give you the best matches.

i have collected many resources over the years. if you want to write to me, shamlet76@gmail.com and request the choctaw resource list, i will be glad to send it to you.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on September 24, 2012

Thanks a bunch, Suzanne

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on September 27, 2012

Looking for info on Clarissa Woods (F332), my great great grand aunt, and from what I gathered, she was half Choctaw through her father. I couldn’t make out the father’s name, but her husband was Banjo Woods, a non-citizen for Red River,TX

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on September 27, 2012

you would get the freedman enrollment packet from NARA or oklahoma historical society. she was enrolled as a freedman and was not enrolled by quantum of tribal blood. links to those are in my previous post.

1900 United States Federal Census about Clarissa Woods
Name: Clarissa Woods
Age: 57
Birth Date: Jan 1843
Birthplace: Alabama
Home in 1900: Justice Precinct 5, Grayson, Texas
[Grayson]
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Marital Status: Married
Spouse’s Name: Henry Woods
Marriage Year: 1862
Years Married: 38
Father’s Birthplace: Alabama
Mother’s Birthplace: Alabama
Mother: number of living children: 9
Mother: How many children: 11
Occupation: View on Image
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Henry Woods 58
Clarissa Woods 57
Wm Woods 19
Jane Woods 20
Eliza Woods 16
Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Justice Precinct 5, Grayson, Texas; Roll: 1640; Page: 16B; Enumeration District: 109; FHL microfilm: 1241640.

1900 United States Federal Census about Clarissa Wood
Name: Clarissa Wood
Age: 56
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1900: Township 6, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Spouse’s Name: Henry Wood
Occupation: View on Image
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Henry Wood 58
Clarissa Wood 56
Martha Wood 17
Rachel Wood 15
Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 6, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory; Roll: 1850; Enumeration District: 177; FHL microfilm: 1241850.

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on September 28, 2012

Those aremight not be her, I can provide more info. Her roll number is #641 and her kids were Preston, Prentiss, Gilly, Bettie, Evalena, and Jennie. Her husband reside in Red River County, Texas.

attached:

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on September 29, 2012

her roll number would be F641. she is on the freedmen roll. the family group is F332.

1900 United States Federal Census about Preston Woods
Name: Preston Woods
Age: 17
Birthplace: Texas
Home in 1900: Township 8, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory
Race: Black
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Son
Father’s Name: Benja Woods
Mother’s Name: Clessie Woods
Occupation: View on Image
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
Benja Woods 45
Clessie Woods 43
Guillie Fort 20
Willie Fort 23
Preston Woods 17
Immanuel Woods 14
Youk Woods 12
Quintus Woods 10
Delbert Woods 7
Emma Woods 5
Bettie Woods 2
Carrie Woods 1
Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 8, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory; Roll: 1853; Enumeration District: 118; FHL microfilm: 1241853.

F332 is the family group.

1900 United States Federal Census about Benja Woods
Name: Benja Woods
Age: 45
Birthplace: Texas
Home in 1900: Township 8, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory
Race: Black
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head

1900 United States Federal Census about Clessie Woods
Name: Clessie Woods
Age: 43
Birthplace: Indian Territory, Oklahoma
Home in 1900: Township 8, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory
Race: Black
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife

this census record was split badly, as the record is at the top of a group. so it will be important to find the parents’ record that matches the children.

1860 United States Federal Census about Benj F Wood
Name: Benj F Wood
Age in 1860: 3
Birth Year: abt 1857
Birthplace: Texas
Home in 1860: Beat 4, Fannin, Texas
Gender: Male
Post Office: Honey Grove
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
L E Wood 12
Harvey M Wood 10
Emma Wood 8
Anders E Wood 5
Benj F Wood 3
Wood 2/12
Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Beat 4, Fannin, Texas; Roll: M653_1293; Page: 176; Image: 362; Family History Library Film: 805293.
location will be important. i don’t know if this is your relative.
texas was a frontier at the time of the census.
this census page is a continuation of another census page.

the freedmen were not enrolled by blood quantum for the tribe. congress only made the provision that they could be enrolled as freedmen but this did not enroll them with the right of descendants to enroll as tribal members.

this website might help you.
http://www.african-nativeamerican.com/8-chocfreed.htm

i don’t know if the 1885 census on that website is complete. i think there are more districts. you might find more information on accessgenealogy.
but the original records are at NARA http://www.archives.gov
the fort worth texas office would be most helpful.
the latter day saints may have filmed the 1885 census. see your local latter day saints family history center.

the records for the freedmen and the tribe were kept separate.

you might be able to see a migration pattern by looking at the childrens’ social security application with a SS-5 form. this would tell you their birthplaces and birthdates. they probably submitted delayed birth records to show proof of age 1/1/1937, when social security came into effect. many people didn’t have birth certificates, so the delayed birth certificate was used.

oklahoma pioneer papers might have an interview with a family member.
http://digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/pioneer/
the volumes are sorted by surname.

historical newspapers might be of interest to you. you should go to the local public library/interlibrary loan program. there were historical newspapers at different times in the territory. state historical society or state archives might have some of these newspapers.

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on November 1, 2012

Hey, Suzanne. On Clarissa Woods (F332) card,there is a name on the back of the card above Banjo Woods. I was told that it said Choctaw indicating that her father might have been full blood. What do you make of it?

attached:

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on November 1, 2012

Hey, Suzanne. On Clarissa Woods (F332) card,there is a name on the back of the card above Banjo Woods. I was told that it said Choctaw indicating that her father might have been full blood. What do you make of it?

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on November 1, 2012

i don’t see that pic.
Page Not Found

The page you were looking for could not be located on this site.

you don’t give a name in the post, so i can’t look up to see if he was enrolled in the choctaw tribe in oklahoma/indian territory.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
get the family group and family members, then look up on the oklahoma historical society website to get the enrollment #, check to see if this was the same family group that was enrolled.
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawesresults.php?fname=&lname=&tribe=&rollnum=&action=Search

mixed race people definitely got the short end of the stick on enrollment. that being said, since some of the people in your family were born in TX, the enrollment as a freedman was probably the best that could have been done. natives born in texas were largely unable to meet the qualifications for membership in the tribe. texas was not on the trail of tears in the late 1830’s and people who made late migrations were also largely not qualified for tribal membership.

that being said, i know it was federal policy to enable/approve of relationships between black people and natives. the government thought that black people were docile and industrious and natives were strong in spirit and that any children would be born with good genetic predispositions. unfilmed documents at NARA tell that story.

testimony might shed light on the documents, so you should pursue that.

if her father was not enrolled in the tribe, then he would not be an original enrollee and you cannot claim tribal membership through him.

the choctaw tribe requires that members be descended from an original enrollee of the tribe.

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on November 2, 2012

Suzann at this point it is not about enrolling, but learning more about the roots I’ve never known. I KNOW I’m part Choctaw, without question. I just want to uncover more about my bloodline. That has become my journey, finding my ancestors, African and Native. Now that I got my soapbox speech done,Halito!!!!

JD Woods JD Woods

posted on December 3, 2012

Fr the last few months, I have been astonished by my findings about the connectoon beteen mu Native(Choctaw) and my African roots, but I’m stuck on my research by the guy who I started my journey with, Silas Moore. If anybody has any info on him, or his wife, Fluttie Hook Moore, I’m open any and ALL suggestions.

attached:

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on December 3, 2012

james “jd” woods. i often refer to the enrollment documents because this was the only place where people disclosed their heritage.

i would urge you to look up any enrollment documents that contain information about your family.

i do not know that one name might indicate “choctaw” affiliation. i don’t know. i was unable to see the picture that you had uploaded to show the example.

i am not choctaw or even native. i just have experience in native documents and think that responding to inquiries on this tribe’s website is a random act of kindness for the people who posts inquiries. i answer any of the inquiries, whether about freedmen, choctaw tribe or even other tribes. if you want to know the truth, because i know that people with mississippi choctaw or freedmen roots might lack documentation, i expend more time searching so that they will have an answer.

is this silas moore related to the inquiries on this particular line or is he just one of your ancestors. since message posts carry only the first messageline, you might want to post this as a separate inquiry so that others can find it and respond.

this might relate to your family:
Marriage Record for Synon Lee

Spouse: Flutie Moore Date: 7 Nov 1899 B/G: Groom County and State: Lamar Co. TX

it appears you have put your family tree online, that’s good. i found it. you will need at least an approximate birthdate.
on females, you use the maiden name, not the married name.
there are no children of this marriage.

when i do genealogy, i start with the death, and work backwards in time.
there might be an obituary, a cemetery record, a death certificate.

childrens’ documents point to the parents, fix a family to a location and date.