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Bohanan Family

Tammy Vargas Tammy Vargas

posted on April 8, 2011 and updated on April 8, 2011

I am looking for info on the bohanan family from Hugo, Ok Sam bohanan, Harmon Bohanan was my gggrandfather, James and Julia Bohanan was my g grandparents and lillian dee Bohanan was my grandmother. any info greatly appreciated and pictures. Was also looking for Darlene Bohanan Fields i have lost touch with her.

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on April 8, 2011

there are many ways to spell bohanan, so you have to check for various spellings in records.

harmon bohanan
james bohanan m. julia ?
lillian dee bohanan

1579 Harmon J. Bohanan-Roll 4462 (parents Joshua and Eliz Bohanan)
Wife Julia A. (parents William and Nannie Wood) deceased
James son Mother Julia Wood
Lilie Dau. Mother Julia Wood
Lula Wife (parents Fate Grubbs and Dolt? Wages)
http://files.usgwarchives.org/ok/mccurtain/misc/dawescar.txt

so is this your family?
Dawes Card Information

tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Bohanan Eliz 0 F 1579 P
Choctaw Bohanan Joshua 0 M 1579 P
Choctaw Bohanan Lilie 3 F 1/8 1579 4464 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan James 11 M 1/8 1579 4463 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Lula 20 F IW 1579 IW814 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Julia A 27 F IW 1579 NR GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Harmon J 29 M 1/4 1579 4462 GRANT BB
Choctaw Grubbs Fate 0 M 1579 P
Choctaw Wages Dolt 0 F 1579 P
Choctaw Wood Nannie 0 F 1579 P
Choctaw Wood William 0 M 1579 P
p=parent

since you have given some of these names but indicated different relationships, i am confused.

Dawes Card Information

tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Bohanan Harmon J 0 M M163 P
Choctaw Bohanan Lula 0 F M163 P
Choctaw Bohanan Mabel 1 F 1/8 M163 114 HUGO M

Dawes Card Information

tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Bohanan Harmon J 0 M NB1188 P
Choctaw Bohanan Lula 0 F NB1188 P
Choctaw Bohanan Jr Harmon J 2 M 1/8 NB1188 NB1057 HUGO NB

and this appears to be a different harmon bohanan:
Dawes Card Information

tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Bohanan Elizabeth 0 F 1631 P
Choctaw Bohanan Joshua 0 M 1631 P
Choctaw Bohanan Harmon J 1 M 1/8 1631 4618 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Bertha W 5 F 1/8 1631 4617 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Alice 24 F IW 1631 IW86 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Thomas B 28 M 1/4 1631 4616 GRANT BB
Choctaw Middleton B S 0 M 1631 P
Choctaw Middleton Elizabeth 0 F 1631 P

interview here:
Bohanan, Lillie A.

by Joy Marie Houston Rinehart Lilie A. Bohanan

Submitted by: Joy Marie Houston Rinehart, daughter

Lilie A. Bohanan was born 9-19-1896 near Shoals, Indian Territory. One brother, James Bohanan born in 1888. Her father was Harmon Bohanan born in 1868 or 69. Her grandfather was Joshua Bohanan (according to records of an interview with Emma Jane Bohanan Wilson). He was full blood Choctaw. The mother of Lilie and James was Julia Ann (Wood) Bohanan. Lilie’s mother died when Lilie was barely 5 years old.
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/people/original-enrollees/bohanan-lillie-a/

and this family tree is on the internet:
2. ISH-TE-MI-AH2 (UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Abt. 1824, and died Unknown in Y. She married (1) ISH-KUNUI-
LUBBEE. He was born Abt. 1798, and died Unknown. She married (2) JOSHUA BOHANAN. He was born
August 24, 1819 in Choctation Nation, MS, and died November 24, 1891 in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory.
Notes for ISH-TE-MI-AH:
From Richard Johnston:
“I don’t have any documents on the Wayne Warriers except they are mentioned in the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit
Creek of 1831. Apparently, Ish-Kun-ul-lubbee was a young scout for General ‘Mad’ Anthony Wayne who had
fought earlier in the Revolutionary War. In a decisive battle for control of the old Northwest United States near
Detroit, General Wayne and his troops defeated the British and several Indian bands loyal to England. The Battle
was called: The Battle of the Fallen Timbers in 1894. Apparently, the battle took place near where trees had been
blown over by an earlier tornado. The Wayne Warriers had been given pensions by the government and Ishtemah
was asking the Indian Agent for his last check. It was received 2 years later but who knows if the widow ever got
it. The Indian Agent was charged with embezzlment of tribal funds later in his career. Ishtemah was an orphan
before she left on the Trail of Tears and must have married Ish-kun-ul-lubbee when he was much older than her
since he already had a grown son named Moses Dyer who traveled on the Trail of Tears by himself. "
The brother of Ish-te-mi-ah took her married last name of Bohanan. Julius Bohanan who is my direct line. See
Julius Bohanan notes for more detailed info.
Kathy Pitts
More About ISH-TE-MI-AH:
Census: Orphan
Dawes Roll #: Eagle County.
Notes for ISH-KUN-UI-LUBBEE:
Wayne’s Warriors.
More About JOSHUA BOHANAN:
Burial: Unknown, Spring Chapel Cemetery
Census 1: 1885, Kiamitia County, Choctaw Census.
Census 2: 1896, Choctaw Census; Kiamitia as James Bohanan living with Harmon J. Bohanan.
Dawes Roll #: Kiamitia County.
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/p/i/t/Katheryn-H-Pitts/PDFGENE1.pdf

and another:
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/a/s/Jane—Cassel/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0382.html
Harmon Joshua Bohanon (son of Joshua Bohanan) was born 18681084, 1085, 1086, and died 1922 in Durant, OK.1087, 1088, 1089. He married (1) Julia Ann Bohanan, daughter of William J. Wood and Nannie A. Day. He married (2) Julia Ann Bohanan, daughter of William J. Wood and Nannie A. Day. He married (5) July Julia Ann Wood, daughter of William J. Wood and Nannie A. Day.

Includes NotesNotes for Harmon Joshua Bohanon:

[juliawoodged.FTW]

I was in Goodland the day that Harmon BOHANNON killed his brother John
but I ran out of town when I learned that trouble was brewing, I just
didn’t want to see a man die. I heard the shots, as I ran of
This is from theD. Evans indian pioneer paper[woodjuliaged.FTW]

I was in Goodland the day that Harmon BOHANNON killed his brother John
but I ran out of town when I learned that trouble was brewing, I just
didn’t want to see a man die. I heard the shots, as I ran of
This is from theD. Evans indian pioneer paper

More About Harmon Joshua Bohanon:
Date born 2: 1868, Durant, Oklahoma.
Census 1: Card 1631 Roll 4618 Kiamitia 1/8 Choctaw..1090, 1091, 1092
Census 2: Card 1579 Kiamitia. 1/4 Choctaw.1093, 1094, 1095
Census 3: 1885, Kiamitia County, Choctaw Census..1096, 1097
Census 4: 1896, Choctaw Census; Kiamitia..1098, 1099
Died 2: 1976, Durant, Oklahoma.
Unknown-Begin: 4462.1100, 1101, 1102

the pioneer papers are here:

http://www.okgenweb.org/pioneer/ohs/evansd.html
this is the d. evans interview and it does mention harmon bohanan. i don’t know if this is your relative.

you might search for hugo here:
http://digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/pioneer/

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

start with what you know, gather documentation, then you can go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates and marriage license and then you can start on your grandparents. if someone passed away after 1/1/1937, they probably have a social security application on file. if you ask a government for a birth certificate, and they were born before 1929, they might have sumitted a delayed birth certificate. death certificates, cemetery information and obituaries are helpful. you can usually get a copy of an obituary, newspaper mentions such as birth of a child or marriage, through the interlibrary loan program – see your local public library for this. i usually start with the death and work toward the person’s birth. military records and pension records can be helpful. census records can tell you where they were at particular times. the census records up to 1930 are available, although the 1890 census was largely destroyed. the 1940 census will be public information in 2012.

first of all, heritage and tribal enrollment are two different things. many times natives didn’t apply for enrollment because 1) they didn’t qualify, 2) they were philosophically opposed to enrollment, 3) they didn’t have documentation, or 4) they were mississippi choctaw and their ancestor had accepted land or benefits in lieu of tribal enrollment.

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906, so you should trace your ancestors down to that time period. mostly, they had to be living in oklahoma by that time and agree to live there permanently.

2 ways to search:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
this will let you enter partial names to get card#. click on the card# in the card column and you can see other names in that family.
other resources on the left and at the bottom of this webpage. native census records and databases are especially useful.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/index.php
this will give you card# (family group) and enrollment #. they have some native marriage records too. other oklahoma records listed at left.
if the name is common, you may find too many possible records.

the tribe has an excellent information to help you. it is found under genealogy advocacy.
http://choctawnation.com/services/departments/community-services/

NARA http://www.archives.gov/ federal records repository. the fort worth, TX office has archives for oklahoma and texas tribes. atlanta/morrow office has archives for the southwest tribes. many offices have microfilmed records for several tribes. note that this web address has changed recently from nara.gov.

mississippi choctaw and choctaw tribe explained here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Trail_of_Tears

http://www.choctaw.org/

jena choctaw tribe in louisiana:
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

MOWA tribe
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
http://www.uab.edu/uabmagazine/2009/july/losttribe
http://www.native-american-online.org/MOWA-Choctaw.htm
MOWA Band Of Choctaws Wilford Taylor 1080 Red Fox Road Mount Vernon, AL 36560 (251) 829-5500. E-Mail: chieftaylor@mowachoctaw.com

other choctaw tribes: http://www.aaanativearts.com/choctaw-indians/index.html

chickasaw historical society 22
Historic Preservation and
Repatriation Office
Phone: (580) 272-5325
Fax: (580) 272-5327
2020 E. Arlington, Suite 4, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

chickasaw tribe
Chickasaw Nation Headquarters
520 East Arlington, Ada, OK 74820
Phone (580) 436-2603
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821
http://www.chickasaw.net/index.htm

chickasaw genealogy archive center 23
Tribal Library
Phone: (580) 310-6477
Fax: (580) 559-0773
1003 Chamber Loop, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

http://www.okhistory.org/
oklahoma historical society

texas tribes
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm

oklahoma tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm
http://www.cowboy.net/native/tribes.html

some links for the choctaw.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
i looked at the land records and those need a lot of work. i have no information about whether or when they will improve some of these categories.

types of records available for native americans:
pages 366-369 in particular although the entire native american chapter is helpful.
The Genealogist’s Companion and Sourcebook:
Guide to the Resources You Need for Unpuzzling Your Past
Emily Anne Croom
you can ask for these particular pages from your local public library. if they don’t have the book, you can get the pages through the interlibrary loan program.
native american records are discussed in pages 352-386.

Tracing ancestors among the Five Civilized Tribes: Southeastern Indians …
By Rachal Mills Lennon
this book could be accessed through the interlibary loan program also.

always find the state archives. some records are online, some records are not. but many times you can find a record not found in other places. you want to see also about newspaper mentions for obituaries, births, marriages in particular.

check courts for probate, civil and criminal cases, marriage records.

if your ancestors lived on a reservation, they might not appear on a federal census because they were not taxed.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
1860 census, indian territory.

this book is a good read about the dawes roll and how they implemented it.
The Dawes Commission and the allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914
By Kent Carter

good advice about native research:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research2.html

if your relatives came from a different geographic location or belonged to a different tribe, try searching google for the state and tribes. you might find a contact for a state-recognized tribe or a federal recognized tribe.

i have collected many resources over the years. if you want to write to me, shamlet76@gmail.com and request the choctaw resource list, i will be glad to send it to you.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

Linda Linda

posted on April 17, 2011

Tammy, We must be cousins. I have the same gg grandfather, g grandfather and Lillian Arizona Bohanan is my grandmother. Her son Loftis Oris is my father. May I ask who Mom and Dad are? She was married to Charles Oris Houston.

Darlene Bohanon Fields Darlene Bohanon Fields

posted on April 26, 2011

Hi Tammy, just found you asking for me. My new email is dmfields42@yahoo.com.

Terresa Bohanon Younkin Terresa Bohanon Younkin

posted on April 29, 2011

I have a great aunt who was Lillian Bohanon she lives in Tenn. I have been told that I was part Choctaw Indian and am looking to comfirm that information. My grandfather was Claude Bohanon if anyone has and information on him could they please contact me. Thank you so much

Rhoni M. Moore Rhoni M. Moore

posted on July 26, 2011

Hi Tammy Vargas: My G Grandfather was Phate Grubbs. His Daughter was married to Harmon Bohanan. I have been trying to uncover information on the Grubbs side of the family for a very long time. My mother now deceased was a Grubbs. My Aunt who is still alive remembers Harmon Bohanan and his wife. They are listed on the Daws Rolls. However she is listed as a non native american. I believe that somewhere on the Grubbs side is either Cherokee or Choctaw or both.

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on July 28, 2011

this post should be in a separate thread, as people might not look here for a grubbs surname.

you should get a copy of the dawes application, census card and testimony. see the oklahoma historical society or NARA/national archives and records administration for that.

http://www.archives.gov
http://www.okhistory.org/

Dawes Card Information

tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Bohanan Eliz 0 F 1579 P
Choctaw Bohanan Joshua 0 M 1579 P
Choctaw Bohanan Lilie 3 F 1/8 1579 4464 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan James 11 M 1/8 1579 4463 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Lula 20 F IW 1579 IW814 GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Julia A 27 F IW 1579 NR GRANT BB
Choctaw Bohanan Harmon J 29 M 1/4 1579 4462 GRANT BB
Choctaw Grubbs Fate 0 M 1579 P
Choctaw Wages Dolt 0 F 1579 P
Choctaw Wood Nannie 0 F 1579 P
Choctaw Wood William 0 M 1579 P
p=parent
IW=intermarried white, a general nontribal description

you would have to do your genealogy. there are many resources listed in this post. however, many times, the only instance where they disclosed their heritage was during tribal enrollment.

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

start with what you know, gather documentation, then you can go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates and marriage license and then you can start on your grandparents. if someone passed away after 1/1/1937, they probably have a social security application on file. if you ask a government for a birth certificate, and they were born before 1929, they might have submitted a delayed birth certificate. death certificates, cemetery information and obituaries are helpful. you can usually get a copy of an obituary, newspaper mentions such as birth of a child or marriage, through the interlibrary loan program – see your local public library for this. i usually start with the death and work toward the person’s birth. military records and pension records can be helpful. census records can tell you where they were at particular times. the census records up to 1930 are available, although the 1890 census was largely destroyed. the 1940 census will be public information in 2012.

first of all, heritage and tribal enrollment are two different things. many times natives didn’t apply for enrollment because 1) they didn’t qualify, 2) they were philosophically opposed to enrollment, 3) they didn’t have documentation, or 4) they were mississippi choctaw and their ancestor had accepted land or benefits in lieu of tribal enrollment.

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906, so you should trace your ancestors down to that time period. mostly, they had to be living in oklahoma by that time and agree to live there permanently.

helpful information about tribal enrollment
http://www.felihkatubbe.com/ChoctawNation/TribalMembership.html

2 ways to search:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
this will let you enter partial names to get card#. click on the card# in the card column and you can see other names in that family.
other resources on the left and at the bottom of this webpage. native census records and databases are especially useful.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/index.php
this will give you card# (family group) and enrollment #. they have some native marriage records too. other oklahoma records listed at left.
if the name is common, you may find too many possible records.
http://okhistory.cuadra.com/star/public.html

the tribe has an excellent information to help you. it is found under genealogy advocacy.
http://choctawnation.com/services/departments/community-services/

NARA http://www.archives.gov/ federal records repository. the fort worth, TX office has archives for oklahoma and texas tribes. atlanta/morrow office has archives for the southwest tribes. many offices have microfilmed records for several tribes. note that this web address has changed recently from nara.gov.

freedmen info:
You can ONLY apply for Choctaw Nation Membership, AFTER you have obtained a CDIB card proving your Choctaw Blood lineage to a direct ancestor who actually enrolled, BY BLOOD. Freedmen DID NOT enroll By Blood. When US Congress closed the Final Dawes Commission Rolls, there were no provisions granting Freedmen any benefits after the Dawes Commission closed. The tribe Constitution states BY BLOOD. however, the documents (application, census card and testimony) may help you find out more about your heritage.

mississippi choctaw and choctaw tribe explained here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Trail_of_Tears

http://www.choctaw.org/

jena choctaw tribe in louisiana:
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

MOWA tribe
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
http://www.uab.edu/uabmagazine/2009/july/losttribe
http://www.native-american-online.org/MOWA-Choctaw.htm
MOWA Band Of Choctaws Wilford Taylor 1080 Red Fox Road Mount Vernon, AL 36560 (251) 829-5500. E-Mail: chieftaylor@mowachoctaw.com

other choctaw tribes: http://www.aaanativearts.com/choctaw-indians/index.html

chickasaw historical society 22
Historic Preservation and
Repatriation Office
Phone: (580) 272-5325
Fax: (580) 272-5327
2020 E. Arlington, Suite 4, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

chickasaw tribe
Chickasaw Nation Headquarters
520 East Arlington, Ada, OK 74820
Phone (580) 436-2603
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821
http://www.chickasaw.net/index.htm

chickasaw genealogy archive center 23
Tribal Library
Phone: (580) 310-6477
Fax: (580) 559-0773
1003 Chamber Loop, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

http://www.okhistory.org/
oklahoma historical society

texas tribes
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm

oklahoma tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm
http://www.cowboy.net/native/tribes.html

some links for the choctaw.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
i looked at the land records and those need a lot of work. i have no information about whether or when they will improve some of these categories.

types of records available for native americans:
pages 366-369 in particular although the entire native american chapter is helpful.
The Genealogist’s Companion and Sourcebook:
Guide to the Resources You Need for Unpuzzling Your Past
Emily Anne Croom
you can ask for these particular pages from your local public library. if they don’t have the book, you can get the pages through the interlibrary loan program.
native american records are discussed in pages 352-386.

Tracing ancestors among the Five Civilized Tribes: Southeastern Indians …
By Rachal Mills Lennon
this book could be accessed through the interlibary loan program also.

always find the state archives. some records are online, some records are not. but many times you can find a record not found in other places. you want to see also about newspaper mentions for obituaries, births, marriages in particular.

check courts for probate, civil and criminal cases, marriage records.

if your ancestors lived on a reservation, they might not appear on a federal census because they were not taxed.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
1860 census, indian territory.

this book is a good read about the dawes roll and how they implemented it.
The Dawes Commission and the allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914
By Kent Carter

good advice about native research:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research2.html

if your relatives came from a different geographic location or belonged to a different tribe, try searching google for the state and tribes. you might find a contact for a state-recognized tribe or a federal recognized tribe.

i have collected many resources over the years. if you want to write to me, shamlet76@gmail.com and request the choctaw resource list, i will be glad to send it to you.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

dan hale dan hale

posted on September 6 and updated on September 6

Hello Rhoni M. Moore, the Grubbs family is my GF’s line, if you’re researching Phate Grubbs of the 1900 Choctaw county census my GF or I can maybe help as we’ve traced him back to TX and Miss…. my GF is Choctaw but thru the Durant family as Phate (James DeLafayette) and his 1st wife Mary Wages, and 2nd wife Mattie Calder were white… looks like you descend from JD and Mary’s youngest daughter Lula??…. danhale1974@gmail.com