Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

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1836 deeds signed by 6 Choctaws

D. Ryan D. Ryan

posted on January 17, 2011

While searching for my ancestors in Ms. courthouses, etc, I came across, in Scott Co., a deed dated 1836 in Jasper Co., Ms. and signed by six Choctaw. We took a digital pic of the two pages. The first is a bit difficult to read; but the second, with the signatures, is clear.
I’m not familiar with terms of the Dancing Rabbit Treaty which is mentioned, but has to do with the Choctaws assigning or selling their rights to a Daniel P. Johnson.
Was he an Indian representative/agent?
May I scan it to the list? or administrator?
Would like an explanation of this document, if possible.
Doris

D. Ryan D. Ryan

posted on January 17, 2011

Oops! I mis-spoke. They didn’t sign. They made their marks and
their names, phonetically spelled, I suppose, were written alongside.
Sorry about that.

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on January 18, 2011

i don’t know about that. have you talked to the mississippi choctaw tribe in MS about that? did you ask the county land clerk?

you didn’t give the choctaw names on the deed.
you might be able to put it in jpg format and attach it.

the local genealogy society or historical society might be able to interpret the document.

about the treaty of rabbit creek:
http://tps.cr.nps.gov/nhl/detail.cfm?ResourceId=1346&ResourceType=Site
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Choctaw_Treaties
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Dancing_Rabbit_Creek
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dancing_Rabbit_Creek_Treaty_Site

a treaty would be in the custody of NARA http://www.nara.org and likely at the atlanta office. the southeastern native records are in a few repositories around the united states based on location of natives.

D. Ryan D. Ryan

posted on January 19, 2011 and updated on January 19, 2011

As best as I can:
Choctaw Deed 1836, Jasper Co. Ms.
Found 2006 in Scott Co. Ms. Courthouse

The State of Mississippi
Whereas we the undersigned Native Choctaws of the State of Mississippi are entitled to land under and by virtue of the fourteenth article of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit c___ and wherein we have employed agents to locate and obtain said lands for us from the government of the United States – Now be it known to all persons that we the undersigned in consideration of the sum of one Dollar….hand paid for the promises and covenants and agreements hereinafter named …and each of us have bargained, sold assigned transferred & set over? And so by their presents, bargain, sell, assign, transfer and set over to Daniel P. Johnston his heirs & assigns to the said undivided half part of all the lands, reservations and (floats?) Which we now may at any time hereafter obtain under and by virtue of said fourteenth article of said treaty And also all the right title & interest claim whatsoever both in law & ___ we have or at any time hereafter, of in or to said undivided half part of said lands, reservation or floats & in consideration thereof the said Daniel P. Johnston agrees to pay us at the rate of one dollar & twenty-five cents per acre for each & every acre of said land which they shall obtain from us & to which we ____execute? deliver good & sufficient titles, so soon as said titles are executed & delivered as aforesaid & we the undersigned each of us having good faith & confidence in the ability honesty & integrity of our friend & neighbor Ichabod Kelly? of Jasper County & State aforesaid, in consideration of the promises to carry into effect the above named contract we & each of us do nominate constitute & appoint him our agent & attorney in fact to make execute & deliver to the said Daniel P. Johnston his heirs & assigns good & sufficient titles with warrantee to the lands, reservations or floats aforesaid, which we may obtain under & by virtue of said treaty & further to do & perform all acts & execute & deliver all instruments Using our seals & signatures, which may be necessary to carry into full effect this contract & to secure to the said Daniel P. Johnston good & suficient titles to said undivided half part of lands & to apply ask for demand & receive from all & every or any person or persons any patents, certification receipts or other evidences of titles & the same to transfer to the said Daniel P. Johnston his heirs & assigns – and further receive from the said Daniel P. Johnston such instruments as may be necessary to secure to us the payments of one Dollar twenty-five cents per acre for each & every acre of land which the said Daniel P. Johnston may obtain from us and to which they received good & sufficient titles The same to hold subject to our order, hereby notifying & confirming all whatever our said attorney shall lawfully do in & ab— the promises by virtue hereof and we & each of us do hereby revoke & annul & repeal all letter or letters, power or powers of attorney which we may at anytime heretofore have given to any person or persons whatsoever & we & each of us declare the same to be null & void – In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands & affixed our seals this the 7th day of July 1836
Signed sealed & delivered P(a?).sha.thak.o
In the presence of Ah.cha.to.nubbe
W.A. White (L?)o.Pa.No.Cha.
Ra-in Williams Chaffa.Twla? bee
She.Co.pa.ho.mo
Ache.la.tah
Mulla? – - Chub.bee

State of Mississippi
Jasper Co.
Personally appeared before me Robert James a Justice of the Peace in & for said county William A. White who is a subscribing witness to the within article of agreement & made oath that he saw the within named Choctaw Indians assign the same to Daniel P. Johnson for the purposes therein mentioned.
Sworn to before me W.A. White
This 3rd August 1836.
Robert James J.P.

Hope this helps someone.

D. Ryan D. Ryan

posted on January 19, 2011

Just noticed that in pasting, format was messed up at the end.
Should read:
Beginning “Signed sealed & delivered”
In the presence of
W. A. White
Ra-in Williams

P(a?).sha.thak.o
Ah.cha.to.nubbe
(L?)o.Pa.No.Cha
Chaffa.Twla? bee
She.Co.pa.ho.mo
Ache.la.tah
Mulla?- – Chub.bee

D. Ryan D. Ryan

posted on January 19, 2011

Can’t count either! 7 signatures

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on January 19, 2011

that’s great. you should post that to the county website at rootsweb, so that others can see it. also you should post it to native choctaw website on rootsweb.

about sharing your research:
http://searches.rootsweb.ancestry.com/share.html

you can post about it here: and maybe tell where you put the document so people can see/find it. you might be able to get help with those transliterated signatures. i’m wondering if this is pushmataha’s signature.

this lady has a GREAT website: http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/

gl. great find. sing it high and low.

you transcribed it. you can submit it to these websites:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~msahgp/
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~msscott/
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~msjasper/
http://usgwarchives.org/ms/msfiles.htm
http://usgwarchives.org/ms/jasper.htm
http://usgwarchives.org/ms/scott.htm

i don’t know about location of genealogy society, but here’s a list. i figure you do know about location.
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~websites/usa/mississippi.html#projects

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~usgwnar/

Jennifer Mieirs Jennifer Mieirs

posted on August 11, 2011

Thanks for the mention of my website.

The individuals who got these lands signed over to them were not government agents but speculators. Many of the Choctaws were cheated out of their land, and received less than it’s real value. There is a case where a whole village signed over their interest for the lands under article 14, of course Jerry Ward didn’t enroll them, so years later when the government rectified it with Choctaw Scrip, well, these Choctaws didn’t want to give that land to these guys, they got really nothing. I found this all in a book that’s on Google books dealing with the Choctaw and Chickasaw. It was testimonies in Congress. Interesting reading.

Anyhow, the document is a wonderful find, but it would indicate these individuals signed over their right to land, either from the land they had or expected to get under article 14 to this person.

Jen

Gwendolyn W Gwendolyn W

posted on January 9, 2012

This very interesting.Upon researching our family history. Our family has uncovered a paternal grandfather by the name of Daniel Johnson who was a wealthy land owner. He was one half Choctaw. We know he originated from Texas but held land in other areas. I wonder could this be him or his father. We don’t have much to go on other than handed down family history. We know he had children by a woman named Angelina Prickett who was Irish.

rayson allen rayson allen

posted on February 6, 2012

Article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek stated that any
Mississippi Choctaw wishing to stay in Mississippi and not move
to the Indian Territory must register with the Indian Agent, William Ward, his intention to do so. Some Choctaw families were given land in Mississippi by this Treaty, but all the others needed to register in order to keep any land or possessions in Mississippi.
Unfortunately, William Ward refused to register a great many Choctaws, especially full bloods, and only accepted a few applications, most of them by white men who had married a Choctaw wife, or were half bloods, or women who were aged widows. His actions were consistent with the disposition or attitude of the white populace at that time, it being the removal
of all Indians to west of the Mississippi River. Legislation by the
US Government tried to rectify the injustice done to the Choctaw by issuing them scrip or papers that could be traded for government land. That too backfired and many Indians were
defrauded or cheated out of their scrip. The whole thing regarding the US Government failing to compensate the Choctaw Nation for lands appropriated and resold, as well as for the personal loss of property was presented to the Supreme
Court in the case of the “Choctaw Nation of Indians vs The United States, US Court of Claims, #12742” also called the
“Net Proceeds Case”

rayson allen rayson allen

posted on February 6, 2012

Article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek stated that any
Mississippi Choctaw wishing to stay in Mississippi and not move
to the Indian Territory must register with the Indian Agent, William Ward, his intention to do so. Some Choctaw families were given land in Mississippi by this Treaty, but all the others needed to register in order to keep any land or possessions in Mississippi.
Unfortunately, William Ward refused to register a great many Choctaws, especially full bloods, and only accepted a few applications, most of them by white men who had married a Choctaw wife, or were half bloods, or women who were aged widows. His actions were consistent with the disposition or attitude of the white populace at that time, it being the removal
of all Indians to west of the Mississippi River. Legislation by the
US Government tried to rectify the injustice done to the Choctaw by issuing them scrip or papers that could be traded for government land. That too backfired and many Indians were
defrauded or cheated out of their scrip. The whole thing regarding the US Government failing to compensate the Choctaw Nation for lands appropriated and resold, as well as for the personal loss of property was presented to the Supreme
Court in the case of the “Choctaw Nation of Indians vs The United States, US Court of Claims, #12742” also called the
“Net Proceeds Case”

marian watson marian watson

posted on November 14, 2013

Thanks. I have Certificate #618 issued claim to land given in the “Dancing Rabbit Treaty” to Ona ha tubbe (she)6th day of Oct. 1845. I was wondering if she and her husband, Robert Tucker traded the land for land in Ark. Is there a place to find a record of the land they obtained?