Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

The Great Seal of the Choctaw Nation
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Is it possible to enroll even if family members were turned down ?

Oneta Nicholson Henry Oneta Nicholson Henry

posted on February 1

My husbands 3’d Great Grand Father Joseph Nally FULL BLOOD MISSISSIPPI CHOCTAW wife white Elisabeth Nally.daughter Nancy Fullinlip Nally
1812 – 1868 Husband
Marriage to William Loggins
1833
Age: 21
Alabama, United States
Emaline identification as Miss Choctaw
This document is my transcription of Emmaline Loggins McFadden’s testimony to the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes in 1902. In it, she states that her maternal grandfather, Joseph Nally, was a full-blooded Choctaw Indian. Her testimony, including family history, is found at the National Archives website:http://archive.org/details/applicationsfore0138unit. This document is entitled: Reel 0138 – Applications for Enrollment of the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, 1898-1914 – Mississippi Choctaw MCR4677-MCR477 (if viewing the document online, it starts on page 599 and her record is # MCR4704). I printed, then transcribed to the best of my ability, the original document(s) found at this site. There are other documents present which I did not transcribe. Also on this web site is a hand-written family tree showing the people referenced in this document. The documents on this website, also show that the application to be recognized as a member of the Choctaw Nation was denied by the commission due to insufficient evidence.
Department of the Interior,

Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes,

Meridian, Mississippi, February 10, 1902

In the matter of the application of Emaline McFadden for the identification of herself as a Mississippi Choctaw.

Emaline McFadden, having been first duly sworn, upon her oath testifies as follows:

Examination by the Commission.

Q What is your name?

A Emaline McFadden.

Q How old are you?

A I was born in ’23, you can count it.

Q Seventy-nine?

A Yes, sir.

Q What month were you born in?

A. December, 9th; I won’t be seventy-nine until next December.

Q You are seventy eight now?

A Yes, sir.

Q How much Choctaw blood have you?

A I don’t hardly know; my grandfather was a full blood, or mighty nigh, and my mother, she was half, and then I come in.

Q One-quarter that would make you?

A Yes, sir, that’s right.

Q What’s your post office address?

A Big Springs.

Q What county?

A Clay County.

Q How long have you lived in Clay County, Mississippi?

A Well, I have lived there about thirty seven years, and in Hinds County, and all right here. Been in Mississippi all the time.

Q Lived here all your life?

A Yes, sir, my grandfather lived down here below, and he wouldn’t go with the tribe, and he got a little claim, ma was down there and tried to get mine and hers, too, and there was a white man by the name of Jack Thompson, and wouldn’t let him have no land, and wouldn’t give me mine.

q Is your father living?

A No, sir, he’s dead; my mother’s dead, too.

Q What was your father’s name?

A William Loggins; he was a white man.

Q What was your mother’s name?

A Nancy Loggins. Her name was Nally.

Q You get your Choctaw blood through your mother, as you have stated.

A Yes, sir, get it right through my mother.

Q How long has your mother been dead?

A She’s been dead about thirty four years; been dead a good while.

Q She was a half blood Choctaw?

A Yes, sir.

Q Did she speak the Choctaw language?

A Yes, sir.

Q Are you sure of that?

A Yes, sir; she could talk some; she didn’t talk that way all the time.

Q Can you speak the Choctaw language?

A N, sir.

Q Was your mother born in the state of Mississippi?

A Yes, sir.

Q Ad lived here all her life?

A Lived here until about six years, I believe. Pa moved back to Alabama, and they lived there then; she wasn’t satisfied because she wasn’t with grandpa and they moved back; I married while I was over there.

Q Your mother got her Choctaw blood through her father?

A Yes, sir.

Q What was his name?

A Joe Nally.

Q Did you ever see him?

A Yes, sir; seen him from the time I could recollect.

Q How long has he been dead?

A Well, he was a very old man when the treaty was, and he has been deal, I recon, about forty – thirty five or forty years, I disremember.

Q How long before your mother died, was it that her father, Joe Nally, died?

A He dies first.

Q How long first

A About ten years, I believe; I think mother lived ten years afterwards; I think that’s the way of it.

Q Was Joe Nally a full blood Choctaw?

A Yes, sir.

Q Sure of that are you?

A Yes, sir.

Q Did he have a Choctaw name?

A They called him part of the time Joe, and Jose, and just anything, his people did; white people wouldn’t have much to do with him; that’s the reason we never got land, because she married a white man.

Q Your mother’s mother was a white woman?

A Yes, sir.

Q What was your mother’s name?

A Elizabeth.

Q Was she lawfully married to this Indian, Joe Nally?

A Yes, sir, now, you know I don’t remember that.

Q How many children did she have?

A She never raised but five; five girls

Q Did Joe Nally speak the Choctaw language?

A Yes, sir.

Q Where was he born?

A Born down here in Mississippi, below here somewhere; I think it was in Jaspar County, and stayed there among his tribe, and wouldn’t go away with them when the treat was, never went, and stayed around.

Q He was a very old man when the treaty was made?

A Tolerably old; now, I reckon he was about seventy; I expect he was from his looks and age; he has been deal a long time; if he had lived he would have been upwards of a hundred.

Q You are sure he was a full blood Choctaw Indian?

A Yes, sir, I am. I wouldn’t swear nothing I didn’t know.

Q Did he associate with the white people or with the Indians?

A He associated with the Indians the most of his time, for the white people wouldn’t have nothing to do with him, and down here where he went to get his claim, and ma went to get hers and to get me some; he wouldn’t go with the tribe when they went off, and he got him a little claim – he called it a claim, and built a little hut of a house on it, and when he was in that house, ma went to see him, and to get ours, and a white man by the name of Jack Thompson run him off of it, and give him an old kind of a house of a think, and wouldn’t give him a thing for the land; the old man just moved about in Mississippi until he died; he died in Monroe county in this state.

Q Do you know the name of either of his parents?

A No, sir, I don’t know the names of any.

Q Are you married?

A I certainly am.

QIs your husband living?

A Yes, sir.

Q What’s the name of your husband?

A Elias McFadden.

Q Has he any Choctaw blood?

A No, sir.

Q You make no claim for him, then?

A No, sir, not a bit.

Q Have you any children under age?

A No, sir.

Q This application is for yourself only?

A Yes.

Q Have you ever made any application of any description before today looking to the establishment of your rights as a Choctaw Indian?

A No, sir, never did.

Q Do you appear before the Commission at this time for the purpose of claiming rights in the Choctaw lands in Indian Territory under article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek?

A Yes, sir.

Q Do you understand article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek?

A I don’t understand it.

This treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was entered into here in Mississippi on the 27th day of September 1830, over seventy one years ago, between the United States Government and the Choctaw tribe of Indians. At the time this treaty was made, the Choctaws lived here in Mississippi and along the western edge of the State of Alabama. The object of the treaty was to get these Indians to move from this country to a new country west of the Mississippi River, a part of which is now occupied by the greater portion of the Choctaw tribe of Indians, and is commonly known as the Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. At the time the treaty was made, some of the Choctaws were unwilling to leave this country, and for the benefit of those who wanted to stay here, what is known as the 14th article was put in the treaty. That 14th article provided that upon certain conditions, a Choctaw who wanted to stay here in Mississippi and not move out to the new nation, might receive land here in Mississippi from the Government. That 14th article is as follows: I am going to quote it to you just like it was put in this treaty seventy one years ago.

“Each Choctaw head of a family being desirous to remain and become a citizen of the States shall be permitted to do so by signifying his intention to the agent within six months from the ratification of this treaty, and he or she shall thereupon be entitled to a reservation of one section of six hundred and forty acres of land., to be bounded by sectional lines of survey; in like manner shall be entitled to one-half that quantity for each unmarried child which is living with him over ten years of age; and a quarter section to each child as may be under ten years of age, to adjoin the location of the parent. If they reside upon said land intending to become citizens of the States for five years after the ratification of this treaty, in that case a grant in fee simple shall issue; said reservation shall include the present improvement of the head of the family, or a portion of it. Persons who claim under this article shall not lose the privilege of a Choctaw citizen, but if they ever remove are not to be entitled to any portion of the Choctaw annuity.”

Q I have quoted to you the 14th article of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. Do you understand that 14th article now?

A Yes, sir, I understand it very well.

Well, as I explained to you, this treaty referred to Choctaws who lived here seventy one years ago, this 14th article. If a Choctaw who lived here seventy one years ago, when this treaty was made, didn’t want to go out there to the new nation, but wanted to stay here and take land under article 15 of the treaty, he was required by that article to let the agent of the Government here in Mississippi for the Choctaw know within six months from the time the treaty was ratified – the treaty was ratified on the 24th day of February 1831, that he did want to stay here and take land, and he was thereupon entitled to a reservation of one section of 640 acres of land, to be bounded by sectional lines of survey; in like manner was entitled to one-half that quantity for each unmarried child under ten years of age at that time, he was entitled to 160 acres, or a quarter section. Now, if they lived on that land for five years from February 24, 1931, the day the treaty was ratified, in that case a Indian was entitled to a grant in fee simple; that is, the Government would give him a deed or patent to the land, and he was entitled to it and could sell it at his own pleasure. That 14th article further provided that persons who claimed on that article should not lose the privilege of a Choctaw citizen, but if they ever removed, that is, if they ever went out to the nation west of the Mississippi River, should not lose the privilege of a Choctaw citizen, but that they should not be entitled to any portion of the Choctaw annuity. The Choctaw annuity is money paid each year to the Choctaws by the government of the United States under treaty provision

Q Now, did any of your ancestors, old folds, or forefathers, ever comply or attempt to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever receive any benefits thereunder?

A Yes, grandpa tried to get land, and so did ma, but they wouldn’t let him have none.

Q How did they try to do that?

A I don’t know; grandpa got a claim, and stayed there, I think – he didn’t stay there more than six months and ma went down there and tried to get our land, and the white folds run them off.

Q Where was that?

A Down below here in this State.

Q Do you know whether your grandfather, within six months from the time the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was ratified, let the agent of the Government here in Mississippi for the Choctaws, his name was Colonel William Ward, know that he wanted to stay here and become a citizen of the States and take land?

A I don’t recollect about that, whether he did or not. He was always off and gone.

Q Did he own an improvement here in the old Choctaw Nation in Mississippi and Alabama, in the year 1830, when this treaty was made?

A No

Q That was when you were seven or eight years old

A Yes

Q Did he own an improvement here when this treaty was made?

A Yes, sir, he did.

Q Where?

A Well, he own one right down here I think in Jasper county and that’s where they run him off.

Q Now, you remember when the treaty was made, do you?

A Yes, sir.

Q Remember that well, do you?

A Yes, sir.

Q At that time where were you living?

A Down here in Lowndes County, Mississippi. My father and mother lived there; lived there all their lives. Well, not exactly all their lives.

Q You were living in Lowndes County at that time?

A Yes, sir.
Q Now, did your grandfather own any improvement there in Lowndes County at that time?

A No, sir, I don’t think he did.

Q Did your father or mother own any improvement there at that time?

A No, sir, nary one didn’t own none.

Q Did your mother, or father, within six months from the time this treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was ratified, let the agent of the Government here in Mississippi for the Choctaws at that time, Colonel William Ward, know that they wanted to stay here in Mississippi and become citizens of the States and take land under article 14 of the treaty?

A No, sir, I don’t think they owned any land.

Q Did they let the agent know they wanted to stay here; that’s the point?

A They did stay here in Mississippi; they come away from where that tribe was.

Q Now, that’s a simple question, and I want you to say if you know, and if you don’t, say you don’t know. I want to know whether any of them, within six months after the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was ratified, let the agent of the Government here in Mississippi, Colonel William Ward, know that they wanted to stay here in Mississippi and become citizens of the States and take land?

A I don’t know.

Q Now, none of your ancestors went out to the new nation west of the Mississippi River when the Choctaws moved out there?

A No, sir, none of them.

Q Now, did your mother, or father for her, or your mother’s father, or any other of your ancestors, ever get any land here in Mississippi from the Government of the United States under article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek?

A No, sir, only just that claim I was telling you about that grandpa settled on.

Q When was it he settled on that claim?

A It was after the treaty. About six years, or seven, along there somewhere, because I know I was eight years old, and he moved off his little home down there, and went down below there, and told that he was going to live down there among them, and he went down there to get him a claim, and he made attempt and set him out a claim, and ma went down to get hers then and mine, and I think, I know she couldn’t get it, and they told her she was married to a white man, and she couldn’t get none.

Q Who told her that?

A I don’t know who told her.

Q You say you were about eight years old when your grand father went down there?

A Yes, sir, I don’t know how long he stayed. Q It couldn’t have been six years after the treaty when he went down there, for you were eight years old when the treaty was made?

A I don’t know, I was along there somewhere; I don’t know exactly; I am telling you the truth; I don’t recollect the very time he went, but I think that was the time. Because he has lived here and died in this State and so did my mother; they never did go to the new country.

Q Have any of them ever gotten any land any of your ancestors, ever gotten any land here in Mississippi from the Government that you know of?

A No, sir, I don’t know.

Q Did any of them ever get any money from the Government?

A No sir, they didn’t.

Q Did your grandfather ever make any further effort to establish his rights to land here in Mississippi?

A No.

Q Did your mother ever make any further efforts?

A No, sir.

Q Do you know how he got that claim?

A No, sir, I don’t know how he got that claim.

Q Don’t know any of the details about it at all?

A No, sir.

Q You think it was in Jasper County?

A That old Jack Thompson, I know well enough who took it away from him, he was a white man, a slave holder.

In accordance with the provisions of article 1 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, the Government of the United States directs an agent here in Mississippi to register the names of such Choctaws as might desire to remain here and become citizens of the States and take land. The records of the Government show that this agent failed to register and report to the Government the names of any Indians who did, in fact, let him know that they wanted to stay here and become citizens of the States and take land, and on this account, the Government at its public land sales here in Mississippi in many instances sold land upon which Choctaws lived and had improvements, and which they supposed they would receive under article 14 of the treaty. This caused a great deal of complaint among the Indians that the matter was finally brought to the attention of Congress, and Congress passed certain Acts between the years 1837 and 1842, providing for the appointment of commissions to come down here to Mississippi and hear the cases of Choctaws who claimed that they had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that their land had been sold by the Government. These commissioners were uuly appointed by the President of the United States and they came down here to Mississippi between the years 1837 and 1845, and heard a great many of these Choctaw cases.

Q Did any of your ancestors appear before any of these commissioners and attempt to establish their rights under article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek?

A No.

Q Do you remember when these commissioners were down here, fifty or sixty years ago?

A Yes, sir, but they didn’t do it.

Q Do you remember where the commissioners held sessions?

A No, sir. Just like they are now. They would go to so many places you can’t keep up with them.

Q Do you remember the names of any of these commissioners?

A.. No, sir

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary Hazlewood

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their names

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sisters

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper Loggins

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you have

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you haveA I had three.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you haveA I had three.Q You have given the name of one of the; what’s the name of the other two?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you haveA I had three.Q You have given the name of one of the; what’s the name of the other two?A Arlevin C. Arnold.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you haveA I had three.Q You have given the name of one of the; what’s the name of the other two?A Arlevin C. Arnold.Q Next one?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you haveA I had three.Q You have given the name of one of the; what’s the name of the other two?A Arlevin C. Arnold.Q Next one?A She’s dead; I can’t tell you her name.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you haveA I had three.Q You have given the name of one of the; what’s the name of the other two?A Arlevin C. Arnold.Q Next one?A She’s dead; I can’t tell you her name.Q What was her name?

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you haveA I had three.Q You have given the name of one of the; what’s the name of the other two?A Arlevin C. Arnold.Q Next one?A She’s dead; I can’t tell you her name.Q What was her name?A.

A.. No, sirAn Act of Congress approved on the 23rd day of August, 1842, provided that incase it should be finally determined that a Choctaw had complied in all respects with the provisions of article 14 of the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, but that his land had been sold by the Government, he should be entitled to select in the place of the land so sold by the Government, land some place else in Mississippi, or Alabama, Louisiana, or Arkansas, from vacant Government land, and should be given a certificate to that effect. These certificates were called scrip.Q Did any of your ancestors ever get any of this scrip from the Government of the United States under this Act of Congress?A No, sir.Q Are you sure of that?A Not as I knows of.Q Do you know of any old persons living who would likely know whether any of your ancestors ever complied or attempted to comply with the provisions of article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, or ever received any benefits thereunder?A No, sir, they are all dead.Q Do you know of any written evidence of any kind which would show or tend to show such a state of facts?A No, sir.Q Have you any witness here today?A No, sir, I aint got no witnesses here.Q Have you any written evidence of any description to offer?A No, sir.If you should find any witnesses whose testimony you desire to have taken by the Commission, they may appear before the Commission, here at Meridian, Mississippi, at any time before the 15th of this month, or within a reasonable time thereafter at the General Office of the Commission, in Muskogee, Indian Territory, and their testimony will be taken.Q Are there any further statements you want to make?A No, sir, I don’t know that there is.Q How many children have you living?A Seven.Q What are their names?A Nancy Casselberry.Q Next one?A John W. McFadden.Q Next one?A James L. McFadden.Q Next one?A Joseph Monroe.Q Next one?A Mary HazlewoodQ Next one?A Sarah Elizabeth Bennett and Caroline Frances Graham.Q Is that all?A All that’s living.Q How many of them have been before the Commission?A John W. McFadden and Monroe.Q How many children have you dead?A Four.Q Did any of them leave children?A Yes, sir.Q How many?A One.Q What’s the name of the one who left children?A Martha Ann; I have got four dead – Laura Stringfellow.Q Who lives where?A (no answer)Q What was Martha Ann’s other name?A Gee.Q How many of her children are living now?A All of them, well she had one dead; she has got three girls and four boys.Q What are their namesA Ira Everett.Q Next?A Mary Alice.Q Next?A Minnie Len.Q Next one?A Sam G.Q Now, what’s the name of the children of Mrs. Stringfellow?A Frances, she is named after her mother.Q Is she married?A She ain’t but ten years old.Q Are any of your brothers or sisters living?A I don’t know; I couldn’t tell you. I haven’t got any letters from them; some was in Texas and some in Alabama, and some one place and then another.Q How long since you heard from them?A Its been a long time.Q You don’t know anything about them then?A No, sir, couldn’t tell you nary thing about them; they haven’t written to me. I have one sister, I believe in the Territory; she writes to my son there.Q What’s her name?A Frances Caroline Thompson.Q Name your other brothers and sistersA Well I don’t know whether they are all living or not.Q Name those you think are living?A William Jasper LogginsQ Next?A James N. Loggins.Q Next one?A John Wilton Loggins.Q Next one?A Henry F. Loggins.Q Next?A Wesley Loggins; that’s my youest brother, and I don’t know nothing about none of them.Q How many sisters did you haveA I had three.Q You have given the name of one of the; what’s the name of the other two?A Arlevin C. Arnold.Q Next one?A She’s dead; I can’t tell you her name.Q What was her name?A.(This applicant has the appearance of being a white woman and shows no indication of being possessed of Indian blood. She does not speak or understand the Choctaw language.)

R. S. Strait, having been first duly sworn, upon this oath states that as stenographer to the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, he reported in full all proceedings had in the above entitled cause on the 10th day of February, 1902, and that the above and foregoing is a full, true and correct translation of his stenographic notes of said proceedings in said cause upon said date.

Subscribed and sworn to before me at Franks, Mississippi this 30th day of February, 1902

Clerk U.S. Circuit Court,

Southern District of Mississippi…

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

COMMISSION TO THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES

In the matter of the application of Emaline McFadden et al., for identification as Mississippi Choctaw, consolidating the applications of

Emaline McFadden……………M.C.R 4704

John W. McFadden, et al…….M.C.R. 734 (or 6?)

Joseph M. McFadden, et al…M.C.R 742

Samuel N. Gee…………………M.C.R. 739.

…..DECISION……

It appears from the record herein that applications for identification as Mississippi Choctaws were made to this Commission by Emaline McFadden for herself; by John W. McFadden, for himself and his eight minor children, May Etta, William O., Robert E., Hattie Elvira, George W., Zackery T., John W. and Laura B. McFadden; by Joseph M. McFadden for himself and his three minor nieces, Mary Alce Gee, Minnie Gee and Laura Stringfellow; by John W. McFadden for Samuel N. Gee, his minor nephew now serving in the United States Army in the Phillippine Islands; and by John W. McFadden for the identification of his wife, Elvira J. McFadden, as an intermarried Mississippi Choctaw, under the following provisions of the act of Congress approved June 28, 1899, (30 State., 495).

“Said Commission shall have authority to determine the identity of Choctaw Indians claiming rights in the Choctaw lands under article fourteen of the treaty between the United States and the Choctaw Nation, concluded September twenty-seventh, eighteen hundred and thirty, and to that end may administer oaths, examine witnesses and perform all other acts necessary thereto, and make report to the Secretary of the Interior.

It also appears that all of said applicants claim rights in the Choctaw lands under article fourteen of the treaty between the United States and the Choctaw Nation concluded September twenty-seventh, eighteen hundred and thirty, by reason of being descendants or married to descendants of Joe (or Jose or Joseph) Nally who is alleged to have been a fullblood Choctaw Indian and to have resided in Mississippi in eighteen hundred and thirty.

It further appears from the evidence submitted in support of said applications, and from the records in the possession of the Commission, that no one of said applicants has ever been enrolled by the Choctaw tribal authorities as a member of the Choctaw tribe, or admitted to Choctaw citizenship by a duly constituted court or committee of the Choctaw nation, or by the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, or by a decree of the United States Court in Indian Territory, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved June 10, 1894, (29 State., 321).

It does not appear from the testimony and evidence offered in support of said applications, or from the records in the possession of the Commission relating to persons who complied or attempted to comply with the provision of said article fourteen of the treaty of eighteen hundred and thirty, and to persons who heretofore were claimants thereunder, that the said (Joe (or Jose or Joseph)) Nally, or ancestors less remote, or the principal applicant herein, signified (in person or by proxy) to Colonel Wm Ward, Indian Agent, Choctaw Agency, an intention to comply with the provisions of said article fourteen, or presented a claim to rights thereunder to either of the Commissions authorized to adjudicate such claims by the acts of Congress approved March 3, 1837, (5 Stats., 180), and August 23, 1842 (5 Stats., 813).

It is, therefore, the opinion of this Commission that the evidence herein is insufficient to determine the identity of Emaline McFadden, John W. McFadden, May Etta McFadden, William O. McFadden, Robert E. McFadden, Hattie Elvira McFadden, George W. McFadden, Zackary T. McFadden, John W. McFadden (2), Laura B. McFadden, Joseph M. McFadden, Mary Alice Gee, Minnie Gee, Laura Stringfellow and Samuel E. Gee as Choctaw Indians entitled to rights in the Choctaw lands under the provisions of said article fourteen of the treaty of 1830, and that the applications for their identification as such should be refused, and it is so ordered.

It is the further opinion of the Commission that under the provision of law above quoted, no person is entitled to identification as a Mississippi Choctaw by marriage, and that the application made by John W. McFadden for the identification of his wife, Elvira J. McFadden, as an intermarried Mississippi Choctaw, should therefore, be refused, and it is so ordered.

THE COMMISSION TO THE FIVE CIVILIZED NATIONS,

Muskogee, Indian Territory,
Jul 18, 1902

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on February 1

there have been a few of these reversed by lawsuit and i don’t know if that happened to your family.

the choctaw tribe requires that new enrollees be directly descended from an original enrollee, so if your ancestor was not enrolled in the choctaw tribe, then you cannot now enroll as a descendant of an original enrollee.

you can contact the enrollment department and ask them if your direct ancestor enrolled in the tribe to see if there was eventually another decision.

i do not see that emaline nally mcfadden was enrolled.
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes

the enrollment department is accessible under services, department.

suzanne hamlet shatto

Lynn Herman Lynn Herman

posted on February 9 and updated on February 9

Oneta Nicholsen Henry , thank you for the information you posted. Emmaline Loggin was my 2 great grand mother, so I was very excited to find this information. I would like to hear from you if you are open to commutation . We may be related.