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The Durant Family Line

Jon Dee Wright Jon Dee Wright

posted on November 6, 2013

I am looking for any and all information regarding my Durant Family Line and if I have any Durant Cousins in Oklahoma.
Starting with me here is my line;
Jon Dee Wright Member of The Choctaw Nation to
Curtis W. Wright Member of The Choctaw Nation to
Reno Cecil Wright Member of The Choctaw Nation to Sarah Ann Margaret Stidham Member of The Choctaw Nation to Mary Durant to Wallis Durant to George Durant to Pierre Durant to Louis B. Durant and She Ni Yah. Please help me discover my family. Sincerely, Jon Dee Wright

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on November 6, 2013

no years or locations in your post, few spouses in your post.

Dawes Card Information

Tribe Last First Middle Age Sex Blood Card Roll Misc Type
Choctaw Wright John 0 M NB1230 P
Choctaw Wright Reno Cecil 2 M 1/8 NB1230 NB1093 ATLER NB
Choctaw Wright Sarah 0 F NB1230 P

NB=newborn
p=parent
the card # is the family group #.

Dawes Card Information
Tribe Last First Middle Age Sex Blood Card Roll Misc Type
Choctaw Griscoll Lou 0 M 248 P
Choctaw Stidham Ada 1 F 1/8 248 535 ATLEE BB
Choctaw Stidham Druscilla 13 F 1/4 248 NR ATLEE BB
Choctaw Stidham Jonathan 0 M 248 P
Choctaw Stidham Jonathan S 1 M 1/8 248 536 ATLEE BB
Choctaw Stidham Laura 25 F IW 248 IW1278 ATLEE BB
Choctaw Stidham Lillie P 10 F 1/4 248 534 ATLEE BB
Choctaw Stidham Mary 0 F 248 P
Choctaw Stidham Zachariah 19 M 1/4 248 531 ATLEE BB
Choctaw Whitner Marion 17 F 1/4 248 532 ATLEE BB
Choctaw Wright Sarah 15 F 1/4 248 533 ATLEE BB
bb=by blood

since your family is listed on the dawes roll taken 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma, you should get a copy of the underlying documents. oklahoma historical society or NARA or fold3.com are sources of those documents. fold3 is online, a subscription service, but the price of one month’s subscription is less than the price of a dawes packet. since you have at least two family groups/dawes packets to order, this would make sense.

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/final-rolls.htm

in order to go back further, you might look at native census records and native databases and rolls.
since your family was “famous” you might find history book references and newspaper references. start with your local public library/interlibrary loan. state historical societies and state archives would be excellent references.

you should correspond with others who have posted information about your family, share sources.

http://www.marciesalaskaweb.com/durant.htm
http://jenniferhsrn.blogspot.com/2013/02/the-juzans-part-3-choctaw-connection.html

these two genealogists do good work.

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/durant-list-of-mixed-bloods.htm

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

start with what you know, gather documentation, then you can go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates and marriage license and then you can start on your grandparents. if someone passed away after 1/1/1937, they probably have a social security application on file. if you ask a government agency for a birth certificate, and they were born before 1929, they might have submitted a delayed birth certificate. death certificates, cemetery information and obituaries are helpful. you can usually get a copy of an obituary, newspaper mentions such as birth of a child or marriage, through the interlibrary loan program – see your local public library for this. i usually start with the death and work toward the person’s birth. military records and pension records can be helpful. census records can tell you where they were at particular times, names of family members. the census records up to 1940 are available, although the 1890 census was largely destroyed.

you will need to know who the family members were 1830-1930 or so, where they were located. a good way to do this is by census records.
the first time period to concentrate on is 1900-1930 because most tribes enrolled during this period.
federal census records can help you here. you can get access through your local public library – two databases: 1) heritage quest, 2) ancestry.com.

the dawes roll shows the applicants to the five major tribes 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma. if your family applied for this, there would be a census card, dawes application, other supporting documents and testimony. these are located at NARA
http://www.archives.gov
try the fort worth, TX office.
there are 63 tribes in oklahoma but only the 5 major tribes list applicants on the dawes roll taken 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma.

requirements for enrollment for several oklahoma tribes:
http://thorpe.ou.edu/OILS/blood.html
What are tribal membership requirements?

Tribal enrollment criteria are set forth in tribal constitutions, articles of incorporation or ordinances. The criterion varies from tribe to tribe, so uniform membership requirements do not exist.

Two common requirements for membership are lineal decendency from someone named on the tribe’s base roll or relationship to a tribal member who descended from someone named on the base roll. (A “base roll” is the original list of members as designated in a tribal constitution or other document specifying enrollment criteria.) Other conditions such as tribal blood quantum, tribal residency, or continued contact with the tribe are common.

http://www.narf.org/nill/resources/enrollment.htm

enrollment is a two step process. first you have to get your CDIB card from the BIA to show your degree of blood/eligibility to enroll in a particular tribe, and then you have to apply to the tribe for acceptance, if you meet their membership requirements.

Tribal Government personnel, usually an Enrollment Clerk, located at a regional or agency office processes applications for Certificates of Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) and Indian Preference in Employment, BIA Form 4432, to anyone who can provide documentation that he or she descends from an American Indian tribe.
http://www.bia.gov/WhatWeDo/ServiceOverview/TribalGov/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_recognition_in_the_United_States
this article has many resources.
however i find the paragraph on “Recognition for individuals” to be somewhat insensitive.

i think someone should rewrite that paragraph.

What are the most typical requirements for membership?
Each tribe has a base roll which was established, usually, in the early 20th century, listing the members of the tribe
at that time. Your first challenge will be to prove direct lineal descent from someone listed on that base roll. Then
you must prove that you have the required level of blood quantum – the percentage of your genetic make-up that
is native by bloodline. Most tribes require a 1/4 blood quantum – that is, you must be at least one-fourth Native
American – but note that the Eastern Band of the Cherokees requires that you be only 1/16 or higher to join, and the Cherokee Nation has no minimum quantum restriction, so long as you can prove descent. There may be other conditions for membership as well: requirements for tribal residency or continued contact with the tribe are common.
http://freedomcenter.org/_media/pdf/genealogy/16.%20Native%20American%20-%20Tribal%20Membership.pdf

choctaw enrollment, forms, FAQs
http://www.choctawnation.com/services/departments/enrollment-cdib-and-tribal-membership/

obituaries through the oklahoma choctaw tribe is through the history link for the tribe:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/

social security application for a deceased person:
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/html/foia_guide.htm
form SS-5.

your public library probably has a subscription to heritage quest and ancestry.com. fold3.com is another useful database for native records and military records, but they are a subscription. however, many times, their month’s subscription price is less than the price of a dawes packet. you can google fold3 and your ancestor’s name to see if your relative’s dawes packet is available at fold3.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
partial names are allowed.

bear in mind that many records are not online. always collect documents, as just the reference to a relative in an index informs you that a document is available.

death records:
death certificate: state vital records or if very old, state archives. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. you can look at death indices, such as the social security death index 1964-present for a date of death on rootsweb.com or ancestry.com.
obituary: see your local public library, interlibrary loan program. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. approximate date of death is helpful. if old, state historical society or state archives might have historical newspapers.
cemetery record: try findagrave.com or interment.net. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. if you find a relative, you can click on the county or cemetery to see if others with the same surname are buried there.

marriage records:
state vital records office, county clerk or if old, state archives or state historical society.

birth records:
state vital records office, or if old, state archives or state historical society. if the birth was before 1940, ask for a birth certificate or a delayed birth certificate. many people had to get delayed birth certificates when social security came into effect because they had to show proof of age. this will be under the name used at the time of birth.

census records:
you will want to search for census records 1940 on down to the birth of your relative. the federal census was taken every 10 years, however the 1890 census was largely destroyed by fire. there are also some state census records and native census records and native rolls. ancestry.com and heritage quest are two databases that include many census records. many native census records kept by NARA (http://www.archives.gov) are transcribed at accessgenealogy.

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
several helpful links for records in the choctaw territory

first of all, heritage and tribal enrollment are two different things. many times natives didn’t apply for enrollment because 1) they didn’t qualify, 2) they were philosophically opposed to enrollment, 3) they didn’t have documentation, or 4) they were mississippi choctaw and their ancestor had accepted land or benefits in lieu of tribal enrollment. some mississippi choctaw were accepted by adoption or lawsuit.

for those people who do not yet have a card, you should research the 1900-1940 census to know approximate dates of birth, birthplaces, family members. this will also tell you if someone is more likely to be on the freedman roll or as applicants to the dawes roll taken 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma for the five major tribes.

applicants on the dawes roll can be found here:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
partial names are ok. look at the guide link for explanation of the codes.

when you find a possible name, then click on the card# in the card column to see the family group. if it is your family group, and they were likely enrolled, then you can search the oklahoma historical society’s dawes roll link to get the enrollment #’s for particular family members.
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes

if your family was enrolled by council action early in the process or was enrolled by lawsuit, they might not appear on the oklahoma historical society website. you would have to check with the tribe on that.

even if your family was rejected by the dawes process, you may want the testimony, census card, application information for your genealogical purposes.

the federal census will also help you decide which state to contact for vital records.

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906, so you should trace your ancestors down to that time period. mostly, they had to be living in oklahoma by that time and agree to live there permanently.

history of the dawes roll
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Act
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Commission
wikipedia entries are sometimes opinionated; entered by volunteers.

helpful information about tribal enrollment
http://www.felihkatubbe.com/ChoctawNation/TribalMembership.html

freedmen information:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ewyatt/_borders/
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/F/FR016.html
http://www.african-nativeamerican.com/8-chocfreed.htm
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes

2 ways to search:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
this will let you enter partial names to get card#. click on the card# in the card column and you can see other names in that family.
other resources on the left and at the bottom of this webpage. native census records and databases are especially useful.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/index.php
this will give you card# (family group) and enrollment #. they have some native marriage records too. other oklahoma records listed at left.
if your relative was enrolled by court action, their name might not be on this list.
if the name is common, you may find too many possible records.
you can order the dawes packet from the oklahoma historical society website.

if you find a relative listed on the dawes roll, fold3 may have filmed the record and could be available online.
http://www.fold3.com/documents/46580455/dawes-packets/
other resources are NARA http://www.archives.gov

the five civilized tribes book put out by the department of the interior has testimony.
http://books.google.com/books/about/Five_civilized_tribes_in_Oklahoma.html?id=chATAAAAYAAJ
and you can read it online

and these are the microfilms at fort worth TX archives.
http://www.archives.gov/southwest/finding-aids/native-american-microfilm.html

there may be additional records about your relative:
contact NARA http://www.archives.gov for these and other records listed on this webpage.

75.23 RECORDS OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES 1852-1919
75.23.1 Records of the Dawes Commission
75.23.2 Records of the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory
75.23.3 General records of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes
http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/075.html
(Record Group 75)
1793-1989

http://okhistory.cuadra.com/star/public.html
oklahoma newspaper and archives search. some of these resources may be available through interlibrary loan/public library.
you can try school records in the oklahoma state archives, the oklahoma historical society and NARA.
http://www.odl.state.ok.us/oar/
http://www.okhistory.org/
these two resources might have historical newspapers and local history books. your public library/interlibrary loan program might also have access to newspapers and local history books.

http://www.archives.gov

as for stories, you can see if any of the relatives are mentioned in the oklahoma pioneer papers or oklahoma chronicles.

http://digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/pioneer/
volumes are alphabetical by surname.
if an interview is not online, contact the host of these interviews.

http://www.okhistory.org/publications/chronicles

as for location for your family, you should look on the federal census 1900-1940 for your family and this will give you locations, family members. your local public library probably has a subscription to ancestry.com and heritage quest.

the tribe has an excellent information to help you. it is found under genealogy advocacy.
http://choctawnation.com/services/departments/community-services/
some obituaries:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/obituaries/

NARA http://www.archives.gov/ federal records repository. the fort worth, TX office has archives for oklahoma and texas tribes. atlanta/morrow office has archives for the southeast tribes. many offices have microfilmed records for several tribes. note that this web address has changed recently from nara.gov.

freedmen info:
You can ONLY apply for Choctaw Nation Membership, AFTER you have obtained a CDIB card proving your Choctaw Blood lineage to a direct ancestor who actually enrolled, BY BLOOD. Freedmen DID NOT enroll By Blood. When US Congress closed the Final Dawes Commission Rolls, there were no provisions granting Freedmen any benefits after the Dawes Commission closed. The tribe Constitution states BY BLOOD. however, the documents (application, census card and testimony) may help you find out more about your heritage.

about blood quantum laws:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_quantum_laws
calculations about blood quantum:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wishawa4/Menominee%20Indians/quantum.htm

mississippi choctaw and choctaw tribe explained here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Trail_of_Tears
http://www.choctaw.org/

jena choctaw tribe in louisiana:
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

MOWA tribe
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
http://www.uab.edu/uabmagazine/2009/july/losttribe
http://www.native-american-online.org/MOWA-Choctaw.htm
MOWA Band Of Choctaws Wilford Taylor 1080 Red Fox Road Mount Vernon, AL 36560 (251) 829-5500. E-Mail: chieftaylor@mowachoctaw.com

other choctaw tribes:
http://www.aaanativearts.com/choctaw-indians/index.html

chickasaw historical society
Historic Preservation and Repatriation Office
Phone: (580) 272-5325
Fax: (580) 272-5327
2020 E. Arlington, Suite 4, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

chickasaw tribe
Chickasaw Nation Headquarters
520 East Arlington, Ada, OK 74820
Phone (580) 436-2603
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821
http://www.chickasaw.net/index.htm

chickasaw genealogy archive center Tribal Library
Phone: (580) 310-6477
Fax: (580) 559-0773
1003 Chamber Loop, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

http://www.okhistory.org/
oklahoma historical society
marriage records
http://www.okhistory.org/research/library/marriage.html
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/chocmarriageindex.htm

other historical societies:
http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/SH-OK-NDX.html
some oklahoma genealogical societies:
http://www.censusfinder.com/oklahoma-genealogy-society.htm
http://www.geneasearch.com/societies/socokla.htm

texas tribes
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm

oklahoma tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm
http://www.cowboy.net/native/tribes.html
http://yvwiiusdinvnohii.net/OKTribes.htm

tribes in other locations:
http://www.ncsl.org/issues-research/tribal/list-of-federal-and-state-recognized-tribes.aspx

some links for the choctaw.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
i looked at the land records and those need a lot of work. i have no information about whether or when they will improve some of these categories.

types of records available for native americans:
pages 366-369 in particular although the entire native american chapter is helpful.
The Genealogist’s Companion and Sourcebook:
Guide to the Resources You Need for Unpuzzling Your Past
Emily Anne Croom
you can ask for these particular pages from your local public library. if they don’t have the book, you can get the pages through the interlibrary loan program.
native american records are discussed in pages 352-386.

Tracing ancestors among the Five Civilized Tribes: Southeastern Indians …
By Rachal Mills Lennon
this book could be accessed through the interlibary loan program also.

always find the state archives. some records are online, some records are not. but many times you can find a record not found in other places. you want to see also about newspaper mentions for obituaries, births, marriages in particular.

check courts for probate, civil and criminal cases, marriage records.

if your ancestors lived on a reservation, they might not appear on a federal census because they were not taxed.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
1860 census, indian territory.

this book is a good read about the dawes roll and how they implemented it.
The Dawes Commission and the allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914
By Kent Carter
and you can read this book online. your relatives’ testimony might be in the book.
http://www.archive.org/details/fivecivilizedtr00statgoog
see the menu at left. you can download it.
you should look at the enrollment application, census card and testimony. this post will tell you how to do that. these documents will tell you more about your heritage, but it won’t help you if your goal is to be enrolled in the choctaw tribe of oklahoma. some people were classed as mississippi choctaw if the family had a native heritage but didn’t qualify for enrollment in the tribe.

there are 63 tribes in oklahoma but only the five major tribes are on the dawes roll. look at your family’s location around 1900-1930 time period (census will help you there) and see if there was a tribe located nearby. it is possible that your relatives were affiliated with another tribe.

if they were mississippi choctaw, there is probably a land grant in MS/AL to a head of household called choctaw scrip land. this was given in lieu of tribal enrollment 1830-1880 time period. ancestry.com has a database of the MS and AL choctaw scrip land records, called mississippi or alabama land records. there are other land records in those databases too,, so you have to look at the authority/source cited. NARA http://www.archives.gov has those land record packages.

the mississippi choctaw were not removed from oklahoma. but they were largely rejected for tribal enrollment.

this website might help you in your search. some people are trying to transcribe applications.
http://www.us-census.org/native/choctaw_dawes.html
i do not know what they are trying to transcribe, but this is the volunteer page
http://www.us-census.org/states/graphics/status.htm

and this might be of interest to you:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/choctaw/rights-of-choctaws.htm
Rights of Mississippi Choctaws in the Choctaw Nation

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalrolls/
Index to the Final Rolls of the Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory
the dawes roll is composed of applications to the five major tribes in oklahoma.

good advice about native research:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research2.html

if your relatives came from a different geographic location or belonged to a different tribe, try searching google for the state and tribes. you might find a contact for a state-recognized tribe or a federal recognized tribe.

this page can help you set up a targeted google search.
http://www.searchforancestors.com/google/searcher.html

penny postcards. this is a website that features pictures that were on postcards. click on the state to see the postcards that they have.
http://www.usgwarchives.org/special/ppcs/ppcs.html
if you have a penny postcard, you can click on submissions to add your penny postcard to the collection.

these searches will combine several possible search terms and give you the best matches.

i have collected many resources over the years. if you want to write to me, shamlet76@gmail.com and request the choctaw resource list, i will be glad to send it to you.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

rayson allen rayson allen

posted on November 7, 2013

Re: Seeking info. on Louis, Pierre and Monette Durant
Posted by: angie link (ID *****9986) Date: February 23, 2006 at 08:59:53
In Reply to: Seeking info. on Louis, Pierre and Monette Durant by Kevin James of 807
Ancestry.com/Rootsweb Message Board-
Hi Kevin, I am researching my husbands lineage which comes from this line of Durants. I believe Joseph Durant m. Marie Primot both from France, had Louis b.abt.1750 d.abt.1831 m.SheNiYah b.abt.1794 d.abt.1840 buried Choctaw Nation, Miss. All I know of their child Pierre’s wife, Rachel, died abt.1874. My husband is the 10th gen. of Joseph and Marie Primot..Louis..Pierre..Fisher..Bissand(brother of David Dickson, founding father of Durant,Ok.)..Nancy Cundiff..Mattie L. Armstrong..Bonnie D. Corn..Henrietta Link..Andrew Durant Link..my husband is Andrew D. Link, Jr.,..we have 2 sons which are the 11th generation.

rayson allen rayson allen

posted on November 7, 2013

My name is Dennis Boswell, I live in Folsom, CA and my interest relates to the fact that my great-great grandfather, Edmond Brister of Rocky Point, Attala County, and his son, Moses Andrew Brister also of Rocky Point, Attala County personally knew the Durants and left a few family notes on the Durant family, hence, the reason for my research interest in the Durants.

First, according to THE DURANT STORY, by Cornelia West, with some additions, as reprinted ifrom THE DURANT NEWS, 1901, the town of Durant in Holmes County was named for Louis Durant, who lived on a bluff, known as Durant’s Bluff, just across the Big Black River from where Durant is today.

Following are the notes I have on Pierre Durant,

According to the History of the Choctaw, Chickasaw and Natchez Indians by H.B. Cushman, published in 1899, Louis Durant, the progenitor of the Durant family among the Choctaws,, was a Canadian Frenchman who came to the Choctaw Nation in Mississippi about the year of 1770 with two brothers: Louis and Michael LeFlore.

Randle Durant wrote a book titled, “Foot Steps of the Durant Choctaws” which is kept in the Bryan County Heritage Association. It says, "Louis Durant is the progenitor of the Durant family among the Choctaws. He married a daughter of a Choctaw named Hanak. She was considered a rose among the forest flowers of the Choctaws. He settled among the Choctaws in the late 1770s per Martini.

Louis, like his two friends, married a full-blooded Choctaw Woman. They had 3 sons, Pierre, Charles and Louis and two daughters; Margaret and Cillen (Syllan or Sillen). Louis and his sons served under Pushamatah an ally of the Americans in the Creek War of 1812 with General Jackson.

The book, Durant 1872-1990, by James C. Miligan et al., says the surname is spelled either “Durant” or “Durand.” The name was transported to North America before 1700 from France where there were Durants as early as the 1200s. Guillaume Durand or Durant or Duranti or Durandus was born 1230 and was a papal aide, as Bishop of Mende in Languedoc, where he died in 1296. There was also a Will Durant in the 1200s. The book also describes the Durant Family Seal. It is denoted by four arrows representing Louis Durant and three sons – meaning Family, Strength and Unity. The Tepee represents Home, Love and Happiness. These signs were carved into the wagon sideboards for identification of Pierre’s eight wagons used on the “Trail of Tears.”

Another book, “A Story of Durant – Queen of Three Valleys” by Henry Mac Creary, The Democrat Printing Co., 1945 says, "the name ‘Durant’ is of French origin and it was originally spelled and written “DuRant.” Among the French colonists who settled along the St. Lawrence River Valley and the Great Lakes region during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries were many missionaries, explorers, trappers and adventurers. The Indians then living there told them aboaut a great river west and southwest of the lakes and that it flowed southward. The Indian name for the river sounded like ‘Mississippi,’ so the French people named it that.

Thinking that probably the river flowed into the Pacific Ocean, some of the trappers and adventurers built boats and rafts and, exploring it to its mouth, discovered that it flowed into the Gulf of Mexico.

Among the many different tribes of Indians living in the valley of the great river were the Choctaws and chickasaws on the east side and a few hundred miles norht of the Gulf of Mexico. Many of the French-Canadians ald also French emigrants to New Orleans and Louisiana Territory settled in that region and some married Indians of the various tribes, establishing homes, farms, colonies and towns. Names of a few Frenchmen who settled there and married Choctaws and Chickasaws are Battiest, Ferrante, Colbert (pronounced Cole-bear in French), LeFlore, Moncrief, Dearmour, DuFord, DuEr and DuRant.

In what was formerly the Choctaw country in Mississippi there is now the town of Durant, county-seat of Holmes County."

Randle Durant wrote a paper, “Footsteps of the Durant Choctaws” which is located in the Bryan County Heritage Association, Oklahoma. In it, he says, "Louis Durant was a French Canadian. He was a ‘Cour Du Bois’, that is a woodsman, trapper and trader. He came down the Mississippi River with two other Frenchmen, who were brothers. They were Louis and Michael LeFlore. Soon after their arrival in the Choctaw country, they settled in the Yazzo Valley of Mississippi. Each one of the Frenchmen married full blood Choctaw women.

…Louis Durant was the first man to introduce cattle to the Choctaws. He bought a few heifers and a bull from the French at Mobile. He drove them to Pearl River in Nashoba County of present Mississippi in 1775.

The Choctaws were fascinated by these animals. A lot of stories were told of the Choctaws when they first laid eyes on cattle."

Randle Durant ends by saying, “Louis Durant was adopted into the Choctaw Tribe along with the LeFlores. Louis was adopted into the Hanaka Iska (Clan). He was highly respected by the Choctaws for his honest and helping fight for their survival in the encircling approach of white civilization.”

Louis Durant was a Captain in the War of 1812. His records in the National Archives, Washington, D.C. read:

Choctaw Indians – Louis Durant appears with the rank of Captain on a Muster Roll of Captain Louis Durant’s Detachment of the Choctaw tribe of Indians that served on a campaign to Pensacola commanded by Major Uriah Blue, War of 1812 in the year 1814.

Another document reads, Louis Durant, Captain, Capt. Louis Durant’s Detachment of Choctaw Indians – Black Warrior – War of 1812, commencement of service Dec 28, 1813; separation of service, Jan 11, 1814, period charged for 15 days; pay per month 40 dollars; Amount of pay 25 dollars, 35 cents. Signer’s name Louis Durant, Remarks: Rations here included at 2 per day. One Drawn in kind.

The next record reads Choctaw Indians – Louis Durant Capt. War of 1812 Appears on a Receipt Roll of John McKee, Paymaster, showing payment to men belonging to various organizations of Choctaw Indians; Commencement of service, 27 Feb 1814, Expiration of service, 29 May 1814, period charged for 3 months. Pay per month, 40 dollars. Amount of pay, 157 dollars, 06 cents. Signers name, Louis Durant his mark. Remarks:Rations here included at 2 per day. One being drawn.

The next document reads: Choctaw Indians – Louis Durant Capt, Captain Louis Durant’s Detachment of Choctaw Warriors – Passa Christina. – War of 1812. Appears on a Receipt Roll; Commencement of service, April 3 1815. Pay per month 40 dollars. Period charged for, 2 months, 6 days. Amount of pay, 113 dollars, 87 cents. Signers name Louis Durant. Remarks: Subsistence is here included at the rate of two rations per day, as one was drawn in kind. Subsistence is included $35.

The last record reads, Choctaw Indians – Lewis Durant Appears with the rank of Capt on a Muster Roll of a Company of Choctaws commanded by Capt. Louis Durant, – Alabama Heights, War of 1812, for Roll dated Doakes Dec 226, 1816.

Following the War of 1812, Louis Durant is referred to as Captain Durant.

The choctaw Roll made in 1832 of the LeFlore District in Mississippi, found on page 103 of American States Papers, Public Lands, Vol. VII, shows Capt. Durant with 11 in his family residing in Opookta. Correctly spelled as “Apookta” meaning double (creek) in Choctaw.

In the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, national Archives, Washington, D.C. Record Group 75, Entry 272, Uncer “Vicey” page 196 Book 88. The remarks include the 1843 statement, “Affiants (Pierre Durant) Father received lands by special provision of the treaty on which he still lives…” The land recorded is Section 34, Township 14, Range 5 East reserved to Louis Durant. Louis Durant was one of many leading Choctaws who received land in Mississippi as part of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek.

Supplementary Articles to the Treaty reads, "Various Choctaw persons have been presented by the Chiefs of the Nation, with a desire that they might be provided for. Being particularly deserving, an earnestness has been manifested that provision might be made for them. It is therefore, by the undersigned commissioners here assented, with the understanding that they are to have no interest in the reservations which are directed and provided for in the general Treaty to which this is a supplement …Article II. and to each of the following persons there is allowed a reservation of a section and a half of land (to wit)…L. Durans (Durant).

Sons Pierre and Louis along with son-in-law registered in July of 1831 to remain in Mississippi after the ratification of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek that February. These families lived along the Big Black River in what was Yazoo County. In 1833, Holmes County was created from Yazoo where Durant, Mississippi is located in 1999. Details about their registration is found on the Register of Choctaw names as entered by the agent previous to the 24th of August 1831, who wish to become citizens according to a provision of the late treaty in 1830 found in publications of the Mississippi Historical Society.

Family Trails, Vol 8, written in 1985 and found in the library in Lexington, Mississippi describes the history of Durant, Mississippi. It says, “The surveyors in the party stayed at the Lockhart home and around the dinner table one day the discussion of a name for the town arose. It was at last decided that it should be called Durant in honor of an old Indian chief, Louis durant, who lived at the east end of the Durant bridge and turnpike road. Durant’s home was on top of the big hill…” “Indians of Attala County, Mississippi” compiled by Joyce W. Sanders, April 1987, Kosciusko, Mississippi says that Louis’ land lay in Section 19, Township 14, Range 5. It was situated near Pleasant Ridge Church.

According to the deposition of Pierre Durant, January 24, 1843, page 1070 in the Court of Claims No. 12742, Louis Durant, at the date of treaty, lived on Bogue Pha le ah, now in Attala County, and about fourteen miles from Kosciusko, and about three and a half miles from Big Black. The land records in Kosciusko burned in a fire so we don’t have access to the records of Louis’ land sales.

Randle Durant wrote a family history, “Foot Steps of the Durant Choctaws” in which he said, "Pierre’s married sons and their wives and children also signed up for land, and the total Durant holdings exceeded 7,000 acres. The only requirement was to live on the land for five years and pay a filing fee at the end of the fifth year.

This did not set very well with the white settlers that were moving in and taking over the land and homes of the Indians who had left for Oklahoma. This caused the Durants to stay pretty much to themselves to avoid trouble with the white settlers. There were seven thousand other Choctaws living around the Durant family that had also refused to leave their lands. The white settlers clamored for the removal of all the Choctaws. Harassment and strife became a way of life for the remaining Choctaws.

The white settlers still pushed for the removal of all of the Choctaws. In the spring of 1843, the U.S. Government sent (negotiators to) the old Chief Nitakechi of the Pushmatahas District, to try and convince the remaining Indians to move to Oklahoma. He told them of how good the land in Oklahoma was and of hunting without the influence of the white men."

On the 30th of December 1844, the Durants left Mississippi following the Trail of Tears to Indian Territory. Their journey is documented in the notes of Pierre Durant as recorded for history by his descendant Randle Durant. It is a personal Durant family history; a struggle to try and remain in their homeland; mistreatment by the government; a painful and sad journey. Captain Durant was then an elder. The immigration rolls list him arriving with the Pierre Durant party in Indian Territory and ending their long journey March 20, 1845.

Per Martini in “Who Was Who Among the Southern Indians,” "In HISTORY OF BRYAN COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, 263-264; Cushman, 349; Alma Mason to Author, January 5, 1987, When he died is unknown. Louis was paid for his assistance at the treaty negotiations of 1826 (Choctaw Emigration, OIA, roll 185, frame 6), and Louis Durant Sr. claimed the E 1/2 S 27 and S34 T14 R5E in 1831 (Choctaw Reserves, OIA, roll 189, frame 465)
Following are a few of the notes I have on Pierre Durant,

The 1840 Attala County, Mississippi census says that Pierre was given an Indian reservation in 1835 and this was recognized by a letter on 6 May 1849. The land was in Section 26, Township 15, Range 5 East. This lay just north of Apookta Creek on the Big Black River about halfway between Durant and West, Mississippi. He lost this land for non-payment of taxes.

The National Archives, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, D.C. Group Record 75, Entry 526, Reserve Book C, Dec 1909 by Mrs. M.G. Waring says: “Under 19th Art Choctaw Treaty 1830, Durant, Pierre, 160 Acres, script awarded on 1st Oct 1846, location – 14 Article; Remark: see letter from the Gen’l L office May 25, 1848 enclosing patent for section 26, 15,5E which was sent to Agent Rutherford Oct 4, 1848.”

Group Record 75, Entry 277, Judgements 1843-45, page 146 reads:

“On examination of the evidence and papers filed in the Case of Pierre Durant No. 82, It appearing to the Board that said Claimant complied or offered to comply with all the requisites of the 14th Article of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek and it appearing further that the section of land emb— the improvement of said Claimant at the date of said Treaty. To wit section twenty — in Township fifteen of Range five East is still vacant and that the lands of his children can be located adjoining.

In Persuance of and in conformity to the act of Congress of the 23rd of August 1842, I adjudge and allow to said Claimant said section twenty-six in Township fifteen Range five east, to his child George Durant over ten years of age the east half of section thirty five same township and range, to his child Tina Durant over ten years of age the west half of section thirty five same township and range, to his child Silvester Durant over ten years of age the South half of section lthirty six same township and range, to his child Jefferson Durant over ten years of age, the south half of section thirty four same township and range, to his child Isham Durant under ten years of age the northwest quarter of section thirty six in same township and range, and to the heirs of his child Sophia Durant deceased under ten years of age the northeast quarter of section thirty-four in same Township and range. — John F.H. Claiborne, Ralph Graves."

Note, Randal Durant’s book, “Foot Steps of the Durant Choctaw” contains a graphic account of Pierre’s 1845 journey with his family overland from Bogue Chitto, Neshoba County to Chickasaw Bluffs, on the Yazoo River just north of Vicksburg, where they boarded the Steamboat “Erin” for the five day trip up the Mississippi to Arkansas Post, hence up the Arkansas River to Fort Coffee near present day Fort Smith, then to Sculleyville (about 5 miles from Fort Coffee). Some of his sons settled near Sculleyville in the present day city of Poteau, Oklahoma, Pierre and the rest of the family headed for Horse Prairie (2 miles northeast of present Hugo, Oklahoma) via the Army’s road thatwent through Horse Prairie, 25 miles further east to Doaksville (near present day Fort Towson). At Horse Prairie, there was located a large settlement of over two hundred log cabins and shacks built close together. There was also a trading post and a clearinghouse (a store that dealt in farm commodities similar to a farmer’s co-op.

Pierre settled with Sophia and his two daughters about 1.5 miles northeast of present day Bennington, Oklahoma. George and Sylvester built their homes and farmed about a mile north of Pierre. Fisher took his family and settled about 25 miles further west. in “Carriage Point” (2 miles south of present Durant, Oklahoma. This was the beginning of Durant, Oklahoma.

He signed the 1820 treaty and in 1831 lived in LeFlore’s District. His family then consisted of nine persons, including three males over 16 and three children under 16. He claimed the S 1/2 S23 and S24, 25 and 26 T15 R5E as a reserve (per Choctaw REserves, OIA, roll 189, frame 470).

Records show that he was issued scrip in lieu of S26, T15N R5E in 1848 (per Ibid., roll 193, frame 938; roll 195, frame 92; General Land Office Automated REcords, CD Rom Series.)

He lived in Attala county, Mississippi, in 1838-1845 and moved west the latter year with his family of eight (per Choctaw Emigration, OIA, roll 185, frame 1250).

From Ancestry.com file, “Fought in war of 1812. !WAR: Crowder Dates; 1619-1900; Crowder File; Bryant Co. OK Heritage Library; copy owned by William J. Black.”

Following are a few of the notes I have on Joseph, Pierre’s son:

Child of Pierre Durant and Rachel per “Whose Who Among the Southern Indians, a Genealogical Notebook, 1698-1907” by Don Martini ©, Don Martini, Falkner, MS ; on page 208 references HISTORY OF BRYAN COUNTY, OKLAHOMA 263-264. Martini, on page 206, also claims Joseph’s middle name is “Zorare” and that Joseph was a resident of Blue County in 1855, voted there and was elected judge in 1872. He was still there in 1878

As far as Joseph’s children are concerned, I have little information on them, but do show them to be:

Albert Pike Durant
Morgan Durant (b. 1872)
Joseph “Joe” Durant
Nathenius Durant
Boonettie Durant
Cordelia Durant

Sorry, I have nothing other than their names. I hope this information is helpful to you.

Durant, Ms.
Charles P. Phillips (View posts)
Posted: 4 May 2001 12:00PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: KING
Dennis: thank you so very much for sharing this great information, not only on the Durant family, but on the community of Durant, Holmes Co. Ms., where my mother was born and raised. Mother is a descendant of Chief Moshulatubbee, last chief of the Mississippi Choctaws (whose children adopted the surname KING), so I could very easily relate to your information concerning the Durant family.

Re: Pierre and Joseph Durant
Jim Kealhofer (View posts)
Posted: 7 Sep 2001 10:56PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: King
My wife and I grew up in Durant, Ms and can relate to the information you have in your posting. We are now living in Alabama. We’re also looking for information about Rebecca (Morning Star) King. We believe her to have been 1/2 blood Indian, not sure which tribe. Sorry, I don’t have information about Sylvester Durant. I’m also looking for Charles Phillips, who may have information on the Kings. Rebecca’s parents were Jacob and Elizabeth ?? King.

Re: Pierre and Joseph Durant
nairington (View posts)
Posted: 22 Sep 2002 3:45AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 5 Oct 2002 6:40PM GMT
I live in Oklahoma.My interest in the Durants is this:My husband desends from Louis Durant’s daughter Cillen and William Taylor thur their daughter Elizabeth taylor Airington.My ancestors are through the Leflore’s.My sister -in-law’s grandmother was Minnie Alice Durant,she married a Rothell.Right now this is what I’m looking for,no one can find anything on Minnie Alice Durant.Do you know anything on her.Thanks.Nelda Airington

Re: Minnie Alice Durant Query
Dennis Boswell (View posts)
Posted: 22 Sep 2002 4:35PM GMT
Classification: Query
Nelda, I am sorry, but I am unable to help you with Minnie Alice Durant. Following is the partial text from an email I received from Carl Phillips in early 2001.In this text, Carl is referring to the research of another when he says,

“…there was no mention of the two other daughters of Syllan other that to alluding to one of them. They were Nancy and Liza. My gr-grandmother Emeline was the daughter of Liza.

Elizabeth, who accompanied her, with her two children, was a widow..She married the second time to Drew Arrington. Her daughter Mary Ann married John Pebworth. I don’t know who William married."

Carl’s current email address is <watach@hotmail.com>. Carl descends from Syllan and may be able to help you.

Re: Pierre and Joseph Durant
RobinBunch86 (View posts)
Posted: 30 May 2003 6:53AM GMT
Classification: Query
Edited: 17 Jul 2006 3:16AM GMT
Surnames: Pierre and Isham Durant
My husband is Pierre Durants gggg grandson. I am looking for information about Pierre’s wife, mother, and grandparents. All of whom were Choctaw Indian. Also for information on Isham Durants wife (Margaret Barefield) also Choctaw indian we believe. Isham was one of Pierre’s sons.
Please, if you have any information contact me.

Re: Pierre and Joseph Durant
Dennis Boswell (View posts)
Posted: 30 May 2003 7:49AM GMT
Classification: Query
Robin, about everything I have on Pierre, I posted on the post you found. In that post, I included references to about five or six books on the Durants. I suggest you consult those references through inter-library loan or, perhaps, used book stores. Good luck in your search.

Re: Pierre and Joseph Durant
Dennis Boswell (View posts)
Posted: 30 May 2003 7:53AM GMT
Classification: Query
Robin, one last thing I failed to mention – do a web search on the Durants. You will find literally 100s of web sites with additional information, leads, books and further referrals

Re: Pierre and Joseph Durant
jhock51 (View posts)
Posted: 1 Dec 2009 11:11PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Lefleur, LeFlore, Durant, Durand, Duke of Rand, Louis XIV, Juzan, Krebs, Hamilton, Cushman, Claiborne, La Salle, Jolliet,
“According to the History of the Choctaw, Chickasaw and Natchez Indians by H.B. Cushman, published in 1899, Louis Durant, the progenitor of the Durant family among the Choctaws,, was a Canadian Frenchman who came to the Choctaw Nation in Mississippi about the year of 1770 with two brothers: Louis and Michael LeFlore.”

Here is a great example H. B. Cushman giving insights into the LeFleur as being in error. Louis LeFleur was born June 28, 1762 Michael LeFleur was born October 13, 1767. If these two brothers came with Lewis Durant (who was not Canadian either) Louis LeFleur would have been eight years old and Michael would have been three years old. Pretty good for a couple of very young children to make such a trip.

The Durant family came from France to Mobile. Their ancestor was the Duke of Rand who was a leader in the Court of Louis XIV (1638-1715), sometimes called The Sun King (Roi du soleil), who was the king of France from 1643 to 1715. His reign, the longest in French history, was superficially splendid but basically disastrous for France because of expensive foreign wars.

Louis XIV increased the French culture by gaining international recognition of French arts, literature, and science, drastically transformed medieval France and introduced a more refined, sophisticated style of life. The third monarch of the Bourbon family, Louis ruled France for 72 years, the longest reign in European history, and dominated European cultural and political affairs. During his reign, Louis typified the absolute monarchy of the Neoclassical age, established a sumptuous court at Versailles, and fought most of Europe in four wars. Louis XIV dominated French Mobile."

The Duke of Rand was given land grants in New France, Mobile, and his heirs came into Mobile as part of the bourgeois families. Others in this class of more affluent families were the Juzan and H. E. Krebs. These three families purchased many of the lots in Mobile. Many of these transactions are reported by Peter J. Hamilton in his work “Colonial Mobile.”

The most accurate researcher I have encountered in 40 years is the work by Peter J. Hamilton in his book “Colonial Mobile.” Three times he refers to the Durand family, three times, as owing a great deal of land in Mobile and Hollinger Island. Mary J. Krebs also owned land on Hollinger Island. Most of the island was owned by the Rochon family. Hamilton then refers to this family as the Durant family one time. The Duke of Rand, the Durand and on to the family name of Durant. This appears to be the manner in which the family name of Durant came to be today.

The works by H. B. Cushman and William Charles Cole Claiborne are widely accepted as basic classics dealing with the history of the Choctaws and their indivdual leaders. While these are primary sources for serious researchers, like many I have discovered critical flaws in their works. Flaws which mislead those who are seeing the authentic events in human history, I do accept most of their reporting. These men were not perfect. They were however perfectly human. I am so grateful for their works. Study their works with a critical mind.

I read with a crirical mind. I do not mean an angry mind. I am speaking of the critique of these works, as all works, we study. Before we make a judgement as to the reliability of what they have written. I also invite you to do the same with me. If I am wrong, please report to me that I am. I will be more than happy to make the adjustments needed to improve my own personal work. I will listen to you and/or read your work with an open and objective mind.

Anoher great family name in the history of the Choctaws in Mississippi and Oklahoma is the Colbert family. Jean Baptiste Colbert was directed by Louis XIV to be the overseer all of New France. Jean Baptiste Colbert then directed all of the explorations of New France for his King.

In 1682, under the directions of Jean Baptiste Colbert, Robert Cavalier Sieur de La Salle and a larger party of explorers followed much the same route as Marquette and Jolliet. But La Salle’s journey brought him all the way to the Gulf of Mexico; where he named the land of for his King and named it in his honor, Louisiana. In honor of Jean Baptiste Colbert he named the great river, in French, La rivière de Colbert. This name was later changed and became known as the Mississippi River.

rayson allen rayson allen

posted on November 7, 2013

Generation One – The Durant Family
1. Pierre DURANT (Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born abt.. 1780 in Yazoo County Mississippi,
and died 1855 in Kiamitia County, Choctaw Nation (OK). He married Rachel. She died 1874.

Children of Pierre DURANT and Rachel are:
+ 2 i. Fisher DURANT was born UNKNOWN in Attala County Mississippi.
+ 3 ii. Jefferson DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
+ 4 iii. Sylvester DURANT was born 1816 in Mississippi, and died 28 OCT 1876.
+ 5 iv. Isham DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
+ 6 v. Ellis DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
+ 7 vi. Joseph Zozare DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
8 vii. Molly DURANT was born UNKNOWN in Mississipi. She married Leroy GRIGGS. He was born in Georgia.
9 viii. Phyllis DURANT was born UNKNOWN. She married Lewis ROBERSON.
10 ix. Sophia DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
+ 11 x. Monette DURANT was born UNKNOWN. She married John FOLSOM.
+ 12 xi. George DURANT was born 1814.

Generation Two – The Durant Family

2. Fisher DURANT (Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born UNKNOWN in Attala County,
Mississippi. He married Peggy .

Children of Fisher DURANT and Peggy are:
+ 13 i. Dickson David DURANT was born 1838 in Mississippi, and died 9 APR 1906 in Durant, Blue (now Bryan) Co. Oklahoma.
+ 14 ii. Bissant DURANT was born 1834 in Attala County, Mississippi.
15 iii. Jessee DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

3. Jefferson DURANT (Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born UNKNOWN.

Children of Jefferson DURANT are:
16 i. Immahnowahona DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
17 ii. Atoshawahona DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
18 iii. Mintihona DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
19 iv. Asilhhvbbi DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

4. Sylvester DURANT (Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born 1816 in Mississippi, and died
28 OCT 1876. He married Martha ROBINSON.

Children of Sylvester DURANT and Martha ROBINSON are:

+ 20 i. William A. DURANT was born 18 MAR 1866 in Bennington, Blue County, Choctaw Nation, IT.
21 ii. Cassie DURANT was born UNKNOWN. She married Martin Sims CROWDER, son of Eli White CROWDER and Margaret DURANT. He was born ABT. 1828.
22 iii. Isabell DURANT was born UNKNOWN. She married Sam GARDNER. She married Edmond JONES.
+ 23 iv. Czarina DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
24 v. Baby Girl DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
+ 25 vi. Pierre DURANT II was born 17 SEP 1858, and died 5 MAR 1909.

5. Isham DURANT (Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born UNKNOWN. He married Margaret BAREFIELD.

Children of Isham DURANT and Margaret BAREFIELD are:
26 i. Lou F. DURANT was born 1852.
27 ii. Mary DURANT was born UNKNOWN. She married Jonathan STIDAM.

6. Ellis DURANT (Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born UNKNOWN. He married PoSa
CHANA. He married Harriett .

Child of Ellis DURANT and PoSa CHANA is: 28 i. Cornelius DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

7. Joseph Zozare DURANT (Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born UNKNOWN. He married
Sophia J. CAVANDER 2 AUG 1860.

Children of Joseph Zozare DURANT and Sophia J. CAVANDER are:
29 i. Morgan DURANT was born 1872.
30 ii. Albert Pike DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
31 iii. Nathanius DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
32 iv. Beonettie DURANT was born UNKNOWN, m. John Folsom, Jr.
33 v. Cordelia DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

11. Monette Durant (Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1), b. unknown; m. John Folsom6.
Monette and John Folsom had the following children:
+ 34. i. John Folsom7, Jr., b. ?, m. Boenettie Durant, daughter of Joseph Zozare DURANT and Sophia J.
CAVANDER.
35. ii. unknown
36. iii. unknown
37. iv. unknown
38. v. unknown
39. vi. unknown
40. vii. unknown
41. viii. unknown
42. ix. unknown
43. x. unknown
12. George DURANT (Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born 1814. He married Vicey ,
daughter of Louis B. DURANT and SheNiYah. She was born UNKNOWN.

Children of George DURANT and Vicey are:
44 i. Fannie DURANT was born UNKNOWN. She married Richard CROWDER.
+ 45 ii. Alexander R. ‘Alec’ DURANT was born 1835.
46 iii. George DURANT , Jr. was born UNKNOWN.
47 iv. Visee DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
+ 48 v. Wallis DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
49 vi. Simpson DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
50 vii. Eliza DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
51 viii. Phillis DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

Generation Three – The Durant Family

13. Dickson David DURANT (Fisher DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born 1838 in Mississippi, and died 9 APR 1906 in Durant, Blue (now Bryan) Co. Oklahoma. He married Kate ‘Kitty’ HARNEY ABT. 1855 in Carriage Point, Chickasaw Nation. He married Caroline Jane HOLMES 6 AUG 1860. He married Mary HUTCHISON ABT. 1871, daughter of James HUTCHISON , Sr. and Martha ROBINSON. He married Annie BAREFOOT AFT. 1880. He married Maggie BURFORD AFT. 1881. She was born 1848. He married Mary TYSON AFT. 1882.

Children of Dickson David DURANT and Kate ‘Kitty’ HARNEY are:
+ 52 i. Salina DURANT was born 9 JUN 1857 in Blue County, Choctaw Nation, and died 21 APR 1884 in Blue County, Choctaw Nation.
+ 53 ii. Melvina DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
+ 54 iii. Melinda DURANT was born 29 SEP 1859, and died FEB 1888.

Children of Dickson David DURANT and Mary HUTCHISON are:
55 i. John Wesley DURANT was born 1871, and died 12 JAN 1921.
+ 56 ii. Mattie DURANT was born 7 SEP 1872, and died 25 AUG 1952.
+ 57 iii. Fannie DURANT was born 1873, and died 1908.
+ 58 iv. Mollie DURANT was born 16 JUN 1877, and died 11 NOV 1905.
+ 59 v. Rosa Lee ‘Rosie’ DURANT was born 1880, and died 23 APR 1908.

Children of Bissant DURANT and Lily BATTIESTE are:
60 i. Sophia DURANT was born UNKNOWN. She married Joshua CROWDER, son of Eli White CROWDER and Martha ‘Patsy’ GOINGS. He was born ABT. 1854.
61 ii. John DURANT was born 1857, and died 1896. He married Isabelle Elizabeth HUTCHISON, daughter of James HUTCHISON , Sr. and Martha ROBINSON.
62 iii. Joseph Zozare DURANT II was born 1866, and died 1890. He married Sarah MCDONALD. He married Susan LEFLORE.
63 iv. Allen DURANT was born 1869. He married Lucinda CROWDER.
64 v. Frank DURANT was born 1870. He married Eliza FRAZIER. He married Silway WARD. He
married Ruby FOLSOM.
65 vi. Nancy DURANT was born 1861, and died 20 FEB 1902.

20. William A. DURANT (Sylvester DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born
18 MAR 1866 in Bennington, Blue County, Choctaw Nation, IT. He married Ida May CORBER.

Children of William A. DURANT and Ida May CORBER are:
66 i. William E. L. DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
67 ii. James G. DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

23. Czarina DURANT (Sylvester DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born UNKNOWN. She married Fred THOMPSON.

Child of Czarina DURANT and Fred THOMPSON is:
68 i. Marion THOMPSON was born UNKNOWN.

25. Pierre DURANT II (Sylvester DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born 17 SEP 1858, and died 5 MAR 1909. He married Melvina DURANT, daughter of Dickson David DURANT and Kate ‘Kitty’ HARNEY. She was born UNKNOWN.

Children of Pierre DURANT II and Melvina DURANT are:
69 i. Lena DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
70 ii. Bert DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
71 iii. Juanita DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
72 iv. Florence DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
73 v. Clint DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

34 . i. John FOLSOM7, Jr., b. UNKNOWN m. Boenettie DURANT b. unknown, daughter of Joseph Zozare
DURANT
John FOLSOM, Jr. and Boenettie had the following child:
100. i. Charlotte Folsom8, b. 1855;d. 1877, Oklahoma. Charlotte married Benjamin2 Hampton, b. 1852, d. 1943. Ben Hampton married three times.
ii. John Folsom V.
iii. Sarah Folsom.
iv. Unknown female Folsom.

35. Alexander R. ‘Alec’ DURANT (George DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born 1835. He married Sallie .

Children of Alexander R. ‘Alec’ DURANT and Sallie are:
74 i. Etna Rae DURANT was born 24 JUN 1899.
75 ii. George E. F. DURANT was born UNKNOWN, and died 18 OCT 1899.

38. Wallis DURANT (George DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born UNKNOWN. He married Sharlott WADE.

Children of Wallis DURANT and Sharlott WADE are:
76 i. John Hobbs DURANT was born 1856. He married Sarah Caroline MITCHELL. She was born 1860.
77 ii. Thomas DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
78 iii. Mary DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
79 iv. Lydia DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
80 v. Solomon DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
81 vi. Harris DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

Generation Four – The Durant Family

42. Salina DURANT (Dickson David DURANT5, Fisher DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born 9 JUN 1857 in Blue County, Choctaw Nation, and died 21 APR 1884 in Blue County, Choctaw Nation. She married Frederick R. ROBINSON 12 OCT 1873 in Durant, Choctaw Nation. He was born 6 OCT 1852 in Arkansas, and died 11 JUL 1923 in Durant, Oklahoma.

Children of Salina DURANT and Frederick R. ROBINSON are:
82 i. Minnie J. ‘Janie’ ROBINSON was born 1875.
83 ii. Jesse ROBINSON was born 1877.
84 iii. Tempie ROBINSON was born 1879.
85 iv. William ‘Willie’ ROBINSON was born 1881.
86 v. Frances ROBINSON was born UNKNOWN.

43. Melvina DURANT (Dickson David DURANT5, Fisher DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born UNKNOWN. She married Pierre DURANT II, son of Sylvester DURANT and Martha ROBINSON. He was born 17 SEP 1858, and died 5 MAR 1909.

Children of Melvina DURANT and Pierre DURANT II are:
69 i. Lena DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
70 ii. Bert DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
71 iii. Juanita DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
72 iv. Florence DURANT was born UNKNOWN.
73 v. Clint DURANT was born UNKNOWN.

44. Melinda DURANT (Dickson David DURANT5, Fisher DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born 29 SEP 1859, and died FEB 1888. She married Bryant PATE.

Children of Melinda DURANT and Bryant PATE are:
87 i. Ida PATE was born UNKNOWN.
88 ii. Bob PATE was born UNKNOWN.

46. Mattie DURANT (Dickson David DURANT5, Fisher DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2,
Joseph DURANT1) was born 7 SEP 1872, and died 25 AUG 1952. She married Charles Edward BOERNER.
She married C. N. RUTHERFORD.

Children of Mattie DURANT and Charles Edward BOERNER are:
89 i. Charles Edward BOERNER , Jr. was born UNKNOWN.
90 ii. Wesley Lee BOERNER was born UNKNOWN.

47. Fannie DURANT (Dickson David DURANT5, Fisher DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2,
Joseph DURANT1) was born 1873, and died 1908. She married Edward CHAMBERLAIN.

Child of Fannie DURANT and Edward CHAMBERLAIN is:
91 i. Mary CHAMBERLAIN was born UNKNOWN.

48. Mollie DURANT (Dickson David DURANT5, Fisher DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B. DURANT2,
Joseph DURANT1) was born 16 JUN 1877, and died 11 NOV 1905. She married John REESE 12 JAN 1894.

Children of Mollie DURANT and John REESE are:
92 i. Basil REESE was born UNKNOWN.
93 ii. David REESE was born UNKNOWN.
94 iii. John REESE was born UNKNOWN.
95 iv. Jack REESE.
96 v. Maggie REESE.

49. Rosa Lee ‘Rosie’ DURANT (Dickson David DURANT5, Fisher DURANT4, Pierre DURANT3, Louis B.
DURANT2, Joseph DURANT1) was born 1880, and died 23 APR 1908. She married Ward D. BUELL
20 AUG 1898 in Atoka, Atoka Co., OK.

Children of Rosa Lee ‘Rosie’ DURANT and Ward D. BUELL are:
97 i. Gladys BUELL was born UNKNOWN.
98 ii. Glen BUELL.
99 iii. June BUELL.
100. i. Charlotte Folsom8, b. 1855;d. 1877, Oklahoma. Charlotte married Benjamin2 HAMPTON, b. 1852, d. 1943.

Child of Charlotte Folsom and Benjamin HAMPTON:
101. i. Lucinda HAMPTON9, b. September 17,1874, Blue County, IT (OK); d. February 28, 1965 in Ada, OK. Lucinda was 90 years old when she died; she’s buried in Rosedale Cemetery, Ada, OK. Lucinda married Joseph Marcus Burks, b.28 Feb 18, 1868, Corinth, Alcorn Co., MS. – d. 25 Mar 1936, McAlester, Pittsburg Co., OK, buried Oak Hills Cemetery, McAlester, OK

Note: the following lineage is copied from my “Folsom” lineage page, as they are identical.

Children of Lucinda HAMPTON and Joseph Marcus Burks:
31. i. Minnie Myrtle10,4 Burke, b. June 9, 1895, Colgate, OK; d. September 27, 1949, Martinez, CA; m. Reginald Rhea Rogers August 18, 1912 in Sherman, Texas.
32. ii. Willia “Billie” Ethel Burke, b. March 17, 1897 in Colgate, OK; d. November 24 ?, Daytona Beach, FL. Willia (Billie) m. Jack Hudnut October 01, 1921, in OK.
33. iii. Marvin Folsom Burke, b. March 17, 1899 in Colgate, OK; d. June 27, 1966. Marvin m. Geneva Sybil Cooper September 25, 1939 in Shawnee, OK.
34. iv. Odra Mae Burke, b. February 14, 1901, Colgate, OK. ; d. July 17, 1986. Odra Married Wilfred H. “Chick” Clark in Shawnee, OK.
35.v. Burton Oran Burke, b. December 13, 1902 in OK; d. unknown, but buried in NJ. m. Opal.
36. vi. Velma Ora Burke, b. January 24, 1902, OK; d. March 23, 2000, Walnut Creek, CA , m. James Selby Whitely, Sr., February 14, 1928 Hartsford, OK;
37. vii. Jessie Burke, b. ca. 1906, died an infant.
38. viii. Franz Haskell Burke, b. July 09, 1908; d. 1927, McAlister, OK.
39. ix. Joseph Marcus Burke III, b. February 02, 1915 in McAlister, OK; d. December 02, 1991, Oklahoma City, OK, m. Wanda Ross in 1939.
40. x. Paula Burke, b. December 26, 1917; d: unknown; m. Harold Glenn Nelson on December 30, 1939 in Ada, OK.

Lineage: The Tenth Generation:

31. Minnie Myrtle10,4 Burke, (Lucinda9,3 Hampton, Charlotte8, John7 IIII, John6 III, Nathaniel5, Nathaniel4, Israel3, Samuel2, John1), b. June 9, 1895, Colgate, OK; d. September 27, 1949, Martinez, CA; m. Reginald Rhea Rogers August 18, 1912 in Sherman, Texas.
Minnie and Joe Burke had the following children:

41. i. Marcus Newton11,5 Rogers (Minnie Myrtle10,4 Burke, Lucinda9,3 Hampton, Charlotte8, John7 IIII, John6 III, Nathaniel5, Nathaniel4, Israel3, Samuel2, John1), b. June 30, 1913 in Wade, OK – d. March 31, 1972 in Texas; married twice. Married Dora Frances McClure, b. Seymour MO October 5, 1917- d. San Bernardino, CA March 10, 2004; married Joe Francis Brittain, b. Jacksonville, TX July 15, 1923;d. Orange, TX, May 17, 2000.
42. ii. Sarah Lucille Rogers, b. July 24, 1915 in Lula, OK – d. May 25, 1975 in Cypress, CA. Lucille married four times: Virgil Robert Booth, Bootz Mercer, Solon Bell Wood, Junious (Jay) Augustus Danner.

Lineage: The Eleventh Generation:

41. Marcus Newton11,5 Rogers (Minnie Myrtle10,4 Burke, Lucinda9,3 Hampton, Charlotte8 Folsom, John7 IIII, John6 III, Nathaniel5, Nathaniel4, Israel3, Samuel2, John1), b. June 30, 1913 in Wade, OK; d. March 31, 1972 in Texas; married twice; m.(1) Dora Frances McClure; m.(2) Joe Francis Brittain, b. Jacksonville, TX July 15, 1923;d. Orange, TX, May 17, 2000.

Marcus and Dora Frances had the following children:

43. i. Marcia May12,6 Rogers (Marcus Newton11,5 Rogers, Minnie Myrtle10,4 Burke, Lucinda9,3 Hampton, Charlotte8 Folsom, John7 IIII, John6 III, Nathaniel5, Nathaniel4, Israel3, Samuel2, John1),b. August 15, 1938, Ada, OK. Married twice; m. William R. Stumpf; m. James D. Foley, b. December 6, 1942, June 29, 1999.
44. ii. Sarah Kay Rogers, b. July 2, 1940 in Ada, OK
45. iii. Everett Ray Rogers, b. November 25, 1942, Tucson, AZ; m.

Marcus and Joe Francis had the following children:
46. iv. Reginald Marcus Rogers, b. September 8, 1946, in Jacksonville, TX.
47. v. Richard Lee Rogers, b. Jacksonville, TX, June 3, 1949; d. Houston, TX, July 7, 1972.
48. vi. Charlotte Rhea Rogers, b. 1956.
42. Sarah Lucille Rogers, b. July 24, 1915 in Lula, OK; d. May 25, 1975 in Cypress, CA. Lucille married four times: (1)Virgil Robert Booth, (2) Bootz Mercer, (3) Solon Bell Wood, (4) Junious (Jay) Augustus Danner.

Lucille and Virgil Booth (b. 1914 d. 1982) married November 12, 1930.
Lucille and Virgil had the following child:
49. i. Living female Booth

Lucille and Junius Danner (b. 1901 d. 1987) married July 04, 1938.
Lucille and Junius had the following children:
50. i. Bobbe Jean (Booth) Danner (was adopted), b. March 14, 1933; m. Ronald Budda, June 7, 1949.
51. ii. Living female Danner

Lucille and Solon Bell Wood (b. 1917 d. 1972) married November 17, 1951.
Lucille and Solon Bell had the following children:
52. iii. Living female Wood
53. iv. Living female Wood

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posted on November 7, 2013 and updated on November 7, 2013

DAWES ENROLLMENT, CHOCTAW BY BLOOD, CARD # 248
ATLEE, CHICKASAW NATION, INDIAN TERRITORY 1898

Zachariah Stidham, 19, 1/4 blood
Marion S. Stidham, brother, 17, 1/4 blood
Sarah Wright, sister, 15, 1/4 blood
Druscilla Stidham, sister, 13, 1/4 blood
She died 9-20-1901.
Lillie P. Stidham, sister, 10, 1/4 blood
Father of above is Jonathan H. Stidham, white non- citizen.
Mother of above is Mary Durant, 1/2 blood
Husband of Sarah Wright is John H. Wright
Child of Sarah Wright is Reno Cecil Wright, 1/8 blood, born 5-20-1903, Card NB 1230
Child of Sarah Wright is Rosie Pearl Wright, 1/8 blood, born 4-22-1905,Card M 831

Application for enrollment taken 9-22-1898
Approved, Secretary of the Interior, 12-12-1902

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posted on November 7, 2013

1885 CHOCTAW NATION CENSUS, KIAMITIA COUNTY,
FAMILY MEMBERS # 1141-1147

John Stidham, White male, age 30 Farmer
Mary Stidham, Indian female, age 35, wife
Elizabeth Stidham, Indian female, age 8, child
Zachariah Stidham, Indian male, age 6, child
Mymie Stidham, Indian female, age 6, child
Sarah Ann Stidham, Indian female, age 2, child
Joseph Stidham, Indian male, age 1, child

rayson allen rayson allen

posted on November 7, 2013

1885 CHOCTAW NATION CENSUS, KIAMITIA COUNTY,
FAMILY MEMBERS # 1141-1147

John Stidham, White male, age 30 Farmer
Mary Stidham, Indian female, age 35, wife
Elizabeth Stidham, Indian female, age 8, child
Zachariah Stidham, Indian male, age 6, child
Mymie Stidham, Indian female, age 6, child
Sarah Ann Stidham, Indian female, age 2, child
Joseph Stidham, Indian male, age 1, child

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posted on November 7, 2013

ANCESTRY.COM – STIDHAM FAMILY TREE

Louis B. Durant born 1750 died 1831 MS
married She-ni-yak (Choctaw)b. 1794 d. 1840MS

Pierre Durant, born 1780 died 1855
married Rachael, who died in 1874

Mary Durant, born 1-4-1854, died 3-3-1887
married Jonathan H. Stidham in 1875, Armstrong Academy, Blue County, Choctaw Nation. Indian Territory. He was born 1850 Smith Co, Texas Died 2-8-1897 Texas
Her father was Isham W. Durant, mother was Margaret Barefield
Sarah Ann Margaret Stidham, born 1-4-1883 Armstrong Academy, Blue Co. C N I T.
Died 10-3-1960 Atlee, Jefferson Co, Oklahoma
buried in Ringling Cemetery
Married #1 husband, John Henry Morgan Wright
5-15-1901 in Ryan Co, Oklahoma Territory
He was born 2-20-1878 in Sabine Co, Texas
Died 3-12-1918 Corsicanna, Navarro, Texas
Buried in Atlee Cemetery, Jefferson Co, OK
CHILDREN:
Reno Cecil Wright, born 5-20-1903
Rosie Pearl Wright, born 4-22-1905
Jeff Y. D. Wright, born 1907, died 1983
Edith Sophilla Wright, born 1911, died 1997.
Married #2 husband, Hiram William Streeter Hanks on 4-19-1914. He was born 1888 and died 1949.
CHILDREN:
Alline J Hanks, born 1915
Irid L. Hanks, born 1917, died 2000
Era Drucilla Hanks, born 1919, died 1984.

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posted on November 7, 2013

TRAIL OF TEARS MIGRATION, LOUIS DURANT,
CHOCTAW EMIGRATION RECORDS, 1831-1856, VOL. 2
BY MONTY OLSON, PAGE 42

(Heading Title) Muster Roll of Choctaw Indians who have emigrated from the Mississippi River area and located themselves on the Red River.

Mountain Fort Depot, arriving 2-1-1834:

Captain Louis Durant Party-

1 male under 10 years old
1 male age group 25-49
2 females under 10 years old
1 female, age group 25-49
1 male slave
1 female slave

Total in party: 7

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posted on November 7, 2013

COLONEL WILLIAM WARD’S REGISTER, INDIAN AGENT, CHOCTAW NATION EAST, AS SENT TO SECRETARY OF WAR, LEWIS CASS

July 18, 1831
Louis Durant, half breed man, Big Black River
2 children over 10 years of age

July 18, 1831
Pier Durant, Big Black River
2 children under 10 years of age
4 children over 10 years of age

July 18, 1831
Fisher Durant, Big Black River
no children

July 18, 1831
Rosease Durant, Big Black River
2 children under 10 years of age

" I do certify that the foregoing persons did apply to me as Agent to have their names registered to remain five years and become citizens of the States, before August 24, 1831." Signed: William Ward, US Agent, Choctaw Nation East

Found at National Archives, Fort Worth, Texas on Microfilm Roll # 170