Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

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Looking for information on Samuel Nashoba Jones (Alias: James 'Jim' Jones)

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on March 5

no, the land packet will help you with genealogy and tribal affiliation. but it will not help you with tribal enrollment.

the tribe requires that new members be directly descended from an original enrollee. that original enrollee’s name is on the dawes roll taken 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma and were accepted for membership with the tribe during the enrollment period.

see the membership FAQs on the enrollment department. it is under services tab, then departments.

suzanne hamlet shatto

Jon Bayless Jon Bayless

posted on May 12

I am a descendant of Nashoba through his son Woody Jones, his grandson Woody,Jr., and his great grandson Winborn Jones. Winborn is my great grandfather. I am happy to share genealogy information.

Winburn, his father Woody, and their wives applied to be enrolled on the 1896 Dawes Commission Roll. They were both classified as Yowani Choctaw because their group had left Mississippi and moved into Spanish Territory (Texas) prior to the time the remainder of the tribe moved to Indian territory.

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on May 12

you should look at the information on the 1896 application. read this webpage.
http://www.okhistory.org/research/applications1896

you might find the 1896 application helpful with genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

Jon Bayless Jon Bayless

posted on May 12

Thank you Suzanne. I have run across some genealogy information indicating Samuel Jones married a Choctaw woman named Nashoba. While other information indicates Samuel Nashoba Jones married a full blood Choctaw woman, name
unknown. Would Nashoba be a male or female name?

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on May 12

native languages were oral tradition. native names that are typewritten were often transliterated (sound alike spelling). this is why native names are often spelled variously. they were not using an english alphabet. native languages were oral traditions and not written languages. they only became written languages in the middle of the 1800s.

http://www.babynamespedia.com/meaning/Nashoba
apparently this name means wolf.

this might be helpful:
http://www.native-languages.org/choctaw_guide.htm

the name was used for locations and i only saw males with that name, not females.

i am not a linguist nor choctaw, so i am not an expert at native languages.

i am answering your question as best as i can. perhaps other choctaw people might be able to tell you more about that name.

in my family, it appears that there was a caucasian that married a native woman and was known by a nickname as chief. he was not native. for some time, most of the family assumed that he was native, but this does not appear to have been the case. it is possible that after the marriage to a native, the native gave the person a nickname in their own language.

natives often took names of favorite people, places, things.

i would say it was more likely that nashoba was a nickname of samuel jones. you should contact anyone who posts about your family, trade information and sources. this might give you more direct documentation so that you can assess the likelihood of the names. sometimes people misinterpret a particular document or mistranscribe something. that might explain the difference in identifying who had the name nashoba.

suzanne hamlet shatto

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on May 12

native languages were oral tradition. native names that are typewritten were often transliterated (sound alike spelling). this is why native names are often spelled variously. they were not using an english alphabet. native languages were oral traditions and not written languages. they only became written languages in the middle of the 1800s.

http://www.babynamespedia.com/meaning/Nashoba
apparently this name means wolf.

this might be helpful:
http://www.native-languages.org/choctaw_guide.htm

the name was used for locations and i only saw males with that name, not females.

i am not a linguist nor choctaw, so i am not an expert at native languages.

i am answering your question as best as i can. perhaps other choctaw people might be able to tell you more about that name.

in my family, it appears that there was a caucasian that married a native woman and was known by a nickname as chief. he was not native. for some time, most of the family assumed that he was native, but this does not appear to have been the case. it is possible that after the marriage to a native, the native gave the person a nickname in their own language.

natives often took names of favorite people, places, things.

i would say it was more likely that nashoba was a nickname of samuel jones. you should contact anyone who posts about your family, trade information and sources. this might give you more direct documentation so that you can assess the likelihood of the names. sometimes people misinterpret a particular document or mistranscribe something. that might explain the difference in identifying who had the name nashoba.

suzanne hamlet shatto

J.C. Thompson J.C. Thompson

posted on July 14

khembre: A few things you may need to know regarding Samuel Jones. (1) As for the Mount Tabor Community, it was a Cherokee Community after the Treaty of Birds Fort and President Polk’s Executive Order regarding the Ridge Party in 1845. There were initially only two Choctaw families that moved there around 1848, the Jones and Thompson’s. These were later joined by the Spring (Jeremiah Spring et al vs Choctaw Nation) Jackson’s (through inter-marriage with the Thompson) and the Franklin (desc of Sophia Pitchlynn) As far as I know, all the Jones descendants that were enrolled as Citizens by Blood in the Choctaw Nation, did so in connection with the William C. Thompson et al vs Choctaw Nation case. The book on the History of Stephens County, Oklahoma, has a number of family histories you may want to look at regarding these Jones descendants. As well as possibly a few others that were enrolled that were not part of the Thompson case. (2) All Texas Choctaw’s were initially stricken from the Dawes Roll (as were the Jena), except those in the aforementioned case. Their names do not appear on the Dawes Roll but do on the reinstatement list that you can find through the Choctaw Nation. (3) The Jones lines that came to Mount Tabor came from LaSalle Parish, Louisiana. So they are closely related to the Jena’s. The vast majority of the group, even some who did not get on the Dawes Roll, settled nearly Marlow, Oklahoma in Stephens County. (4) Finally, the data that is online, is for research purposes, never take it as gospel. Prove everything!. I saw the info you posted and I can state that it is not all accurate, but then it is the net. Nashoba was also known by the names, Saul, Samuel, James and Jim Jones. The only proven descendants of his, based upon the Dawes Commission testimony are Woody Soloman and Anna. While others may be possible. These are the only two whose families were enrolled as Citizens by Blood and reported their ancestry to him. His names are verified in a letter from Frank Campbell, Asst US Atty Gen. to DOI Sec Hitchcock on March 10, 1905.

The Oklahoma Historical Society in the past had all the documents related to the W.C. Thompson case, but I have been informed that the University of Oklahoma has them now. I would check with both of them as well as see if your ancestor is on the reinstatement list of the Choctaw Nation. Hope this helps. I am not a Jones descendant, but do know some of them, if that can be of assistance to you. Tammy Dice Jones, might be another invaluable source for you.

J.C. Thompson J.C. Thompson

posted on July 14

Jon Bayless: Nashoba is a male. As I mentioned in the letter between the US Atty Gen and the DOI. I have a copy of that letter as well as part of the reinstatement list that was tied to my family. I know of Winburn Jones and he IS on that list and you are therefore eligible to join the Choctaw Nation. He was an original enrollee, although stricken from the roll but reinstated as I mentioned previously. His Dawes Roll number was 16017, census card 5997, 15/32 Choctaw Blood.

I mentioned earlier to khembre Jeremiah Spring, I was wrong, looked it up, it was John S. Spring et al vs Choctaw Nation, that were also Texas Choctaws associated with the Mount Tabor Community.

Hope this helps you.