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Looking for information on Samuel Nashoba Jones (Alias: James 'Jim' Jones)

khembre khembre

posted on February 27, 2013 and updated on February 27

Samuel Nashoba Jones

b. 1765 Okafalaya, Choctaw, Mississippi. d. 1810 Choctaw, Mississippi.

I find evidence his fater was Simon P Jones (possibly Scotish) and his mother was ‘Tuskanoga’ (b. 1732, Choctaw Nation East, Georgia).

He may have had up to 3 wives with possibly 1 of them being white. I have found reference to a Peggy Smith (m. abt 1795), a Cecelia Jones (m. 1794), and a Charlotte Brevard (m. 1801). One of these dates may be inaccurate because the marriage date listed below with the children (found on a website regarding Mt Tabor Choctaw) is earlier and more closely matches the dates of the oldest children.

Here is some genealogical information found so far. The children below are listed as being the product of Nashoba and a ‘full blood choctaw’ woman.

Marriage: ABT 1785, Oklafalaya, Choctaw Nation (Mississippi)
Child: Wilson Samuel JONES Birth: ABT 1785, Choctaw Nation (Mississippi)
Child: Woody Soloman JONES Birth: 5 JUL 1786, Choctaw Nation East (Mississippi)
Child: Anna JONES Birth: ABT 1795, Choctaw Nation (Mississippi)
Child: Andrew JONES Birth: ABT 1795, Choctaw Nation (Mississippi)
Child: Nathaniel JONES Birth: ABT 1798, Choctaw Nation East
Child: Nancy JONES Birth: ABT 1800, Choctaw Nation East
Child: Soloman JONES Birth: ABT 1808, Choctaw Nation East
Child: Unknown Daughter of NASHOBA Birth: ABT 1812, Oklafalaya, Choctaw Nation (Mississippi)
Child: Simon JONES Birth: ABT 1814, Oklafalaya, Choctaw Nation (Mississippi)

Our ancester is Andrew Jones, son of Samuel Nashoba Jones and I’d like to know which of Samuel’s wives was Andrew’s mother. I’d also like confirmation of any or all of this information.

Samuel Nashoba Jones—>Andrew Jones—>Amanda Jones →Sirena Jackson→John William Weems—>Walter Adrian Weems—>Virginia Rose Weems—>Marian Rose Jacobs—>Russell Hembree (my husband).

I am not sure where the registration stopped ; I only know it was prior to the birth of Virginia Rose Weems. I am not sure if any of them were registered with the Choctaw Nation. Virginia said her parents refused to claim indian heritage for fear of being forced to return to the reservation. It was not discussed.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on February 27, 2013

you need more information on the history of the choctaw tribe. there are some links in this post. generally, you need to look at the treaty of rabbit creek, the dawes roll taken 1896-1906 in the state of oklahoma/indian territory, tribal enrollment in general.

NARA http://www.archives.gov has records that the war department kept about 1800-1900. some of those records are transcribed on the accessgenealogy.com website, see the link to the dawes roll and look at the lefthand menu. you will probably find these woefully inadequate to answer your questions because of the form of the records, but this is what many need to work with.

then there’s cemetery records: findagrave.com and interment.net. there might be cemetery records on rootsweb.com in webprojects like cemetery records or the state/county.

obituaries might be found in historical newspapers. state historical societies and state archives often have these. you might be able to get some of these through the interlibrary loan program/your local public library. also, local history books can be found at the same resources.

death certificates, birth certificates, delayed birth certificates, marriage records might be found at state archives or state vital records.

the choctaw language was an oral tradition. efforts to write native languages occurred about the mid-1800’s. so the tribes do not have early records.

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

start with what you know, gather documentation, then you can go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates and marriage license and then you can start on your grandparents. if someone passed away after 1/1/1937, they probably have a social security application on file. if you ask a government agency for a birth certificate, and they were born before 1929, they might have submitted a delayed birth certificate. death certificates, cemetery information and obituaries are helpful. you can usually get a copy of an obituary, newspaper mentions such as birth of a child or marriage, through the interlibrary loan program – see your local public library for this. i usually start with the death and work toward the person’s birth. military records and pension records can be helpful. census records can tell you where they were at particular times, names of family members. the census records up to 1940 are available, although the 1890 census was largely destroyed.

you will need to know who the family members were 1830-1930 or so, where they were located. a good way to do this is by census records.
the first time period to concentrate on is 1900-1930 because most tribes enrolled during this period.
federal census records can help you here. you can get access through your local public library – two databases: 1) heritage quest, 2) ancestry.com.

the dawes roll shows the applicants to the five major tribes 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma. if your family applied for this, there would be a census card, dawes application, other supporting documents and testimony. these are located at NARA
http://www.archives.gov
try the fort worth, TX office.

obituaries through the oklahoma choctaw tribe is through the history link for the tribe:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/

social security application for a deceased person:
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/html/foia_guide.htm
form SS-5.

your public library probably has a subscription to heritage quest and ancestry.com. fold3.com is another useful database for native records and military records, but they are a subscription. however, many times, their month’s subscription price is less than the price of a dawes packet. you can google fold3 and your ancestor’s name to see if your relative’s dawes packet is available at fold3.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
partial names are allowed.

bear in mind that many records are not online. always collect documents, as just the reference to a relative in an index informs you that a document is available.

death records:
death certificate: state vital records or if very old, state archives. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. you can look at death indices, such as the social security death index 1964-present for a date of death on rootsweb.com or ancestry.com.
obituary: see your local public library, interlibrary loan program. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. approximate date of death is helpful. if old, state historical society or state archives might have historical newspapers.
cemetery record: try findagrave.com or interment.net. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. if you find a relative, you can click on the county or cemetery to see if others with the same surname are buried there.

marriage records:
state vital records office, county clerk or if old, state archives or state historical society.

birth records:
state vital records office, or if old, state archives or state historical society. if the birth was before 1940, ask for a birth certificate or a delayed birth certificate. many people had to get delayed birth certificates when social security came into effect because they had to show proof of age. this will be under the name used at the time of birth.

census records:
you will want to search for census records 1940 on down to the birth of your relative. the federal census was taken every 10 years, however the 1890 census was largely destroyed by fire. there are also some state census records and native census records and native rolls. ancestry.com and heritage quest are two databases that include many census records. many native census records kept by NARA (http://www.archives.gov) are transcribed at accessgenealogy.

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
several helpful links for records in the choctaw territory

first of all, heritage and tribal enrollment are two different things. many times natives didn’t apply for enrollment because 1) they didn’t qualify, 2) they were philosophically opposed to enrollment, 3) they didn’t have documentation, or 4) they were mississippi choctaw and their ancestor had accepted land or benefits in lieu of tribal enrollment.

for those people who do not yet have a card, you should research the 1900-1940 census to know approximate dates of birth, birthplaces, family members. this will also tell you if someone is more likely to be on the freedman roll or as applicants to the dawes roll taken 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma for the five major tribes.

applicants can be found here:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
partial names are ok. look at the guide link for explanation of the codes.

when you find a possible name, then click on the card# in the card column to see the family group. if it is your family group, and they were likely enrolled, then you can search the oklahoma historical society’s dawes roll link to get the enrollment #’s for particular family members.
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes

if your family was enrolled by council action early in the process or was enrolled by lawsuit, they might not appear on the oklahoma historical society website. you would have to check with the tribe on that.

even if your family was rejected by the dawes process, you may want the testimony, census card, application information for your genealogical purposes.

the federal census will also help you decide which state to contact for vital records.

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906, so you should trace your ancestors down to that time period. mostly, they had to be living in oklahoma by that time and agree to live there permanently.

history of the dawes roll
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Act
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Commission
wikipedia entries are sometimes opinionated; entered by volunteers.

helpful information about tribal enrollment
http://www.felihkatubbe.com/ChoctawNation/TribalMembership.html

freedmen information:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ewyatt/_borders/
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/F/FR016.html
http://www.african-nativeamerican.com/8-chocfreed.htm
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes

2 ways to search:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
this will let you enter partial names to get card#. click on the card# in the card column and you can see other names in that family.
other resources on the left and at the bottom of this webpage. native census records and databases are especially useful.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/index.php
this will give you card# (family group) and enrollment #. they have some native marriage records too. other oklahoma records listed at left.
if your relative was enrolled by court action, their name might not be on this list.
if the name is common, you may find too many possible records.
you can order the dawes packet from the oklahoma historical society website.

if you find a relative listed on the dawes roll, fold3 may have filmed the record and could be available online.
http://www.fold3.com/documents/46580455/dawes-packets/
other resources are NARA http://www.archives.gov

the five civilized tribes book put out by the department of the interior has testimony.
http://books.google.com/books/about/Five_civilized_tribes_in_Oklahoma.html?id=chATAAAAYAAJ
and you can read it online

and these are the microfilms at fort worth TX archives.
http://www.archives.gov/southwest/finding-aids/native-american-microfilm.html

there may be additional records about your relative:
contact NARA http://www.archives.gov for these and other records listed on this webpage.

75.23 RECORDS OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES 1852-1919
75.23.1 Records of the Dawes Commission
75.23.2 Records of the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory
75.23.3 General records of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes
http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/075.html
(Record Group 75)
1793-1989

http://okhistory.cuadra.com/star/public.html
oklahoma newspaper and archives search. some of these resources may be available through interlibrary loan/public library.

the tribe has an excellent information to help you. it is found under genealogy advocacy.
http://choctawnation.com/services/departments/community-services/
some obituaries:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/obituaries/

NARA http://www.archives.gov/ federal records repository. the fort worth, TX office has archives for oklahoma and texas tribes. atlanta/morrow office has archives for the southeast tribes. many offices have microfilmed records for several tribes. note that this web address has changed recently from nara.gov.

freedmen info:
You can ONLY apply for Choctaw Nation Membership, AFTER you have obtained a CDIB card proving your Choctaw Blood lineage to a direct ancestor who actually enrolled, BY BLOOD. Freedmen DID NOT enroll By Blood. When US Congress closed the Final Dawes Commission Rolls, there were no provisions granting Freedmen any benefits after the Dawes Commission closed. The tribe Constitution states BY BLOOD. however, the documents (application, census card and testimony) may help you find out more about your heritage.

about blood quantum laws:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_quantum_laws
calculations about blood quantum:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wishawa4/Menominee%20Indians/quantum.htm

mississippi choctaw and choctaw tribe explained here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Trail_of_Tears
http://www.choctaw.org/

jena choctaw tribe in louisiana:
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

MOWA tribe
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
http://www.uab.edu/uabmagazine/2009/july/losttribe
http://www.native-american-online.org/MOWA-Choctaw.htm
MOWA Band Of Choctaws Wilford Taylor 1080 Red Fox Road Mount Vernon, AL 36560 (251) 829-5500. E-Mail: chieftaylor@mowachoctaw.com

other choctaw tribes:
http://www.aaanativearts.com/choctaw-indians/index.html

chickasaw historical society
Historic Preservation and Repatriation Office
Phone: (580) 272-5325
Fax: (580) 272-5327
2020 E. Arlington, Suite 4, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

chickasaw tribe
Chickasaw Nation Headquarters
520 East Arlington, Ada, OK 74820
Phone (580) 436-2603
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821
http://www.chickasaw.net/index.htm

chickasaw genealogy archive center Tribal Library
Phone: (580) 310-6477
Fax: (580) 559-0773
1003 Chamber Loop, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

http://www.okhistory.org/
oklahoma historical society
marriage records
http://www.okhistory.org/research/library/marriage.html
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/chocmarriageindex.htm

other historical societies:
http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/SH-OK-NDX.html
some oklahoma genealogical societies:
http://www.censusfinder.com/oklahoma-genealogy-society.htm
http://www.geneasearch.com/societies/socokla.htm

texas tribes
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm

oklahoma tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm
http://www.cowboy.net/native/tribes.html
http://yvwiiusdinvnohii.net/OKTribes.htm

some links for the choctaw.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
i looked at the land records and those need a lot of work. i have no information about whether or when they will improve some of these categories.

types of records available for native americans:
pages 366-369 in particular although the entire native american chapter is helpful.
The Genealogist’s Companion and Sourcebook:
Guide to the Resources You Need for Unpuzzling Your Past
Emily Anne Croom
you can ask for these particular pages from your local public library. if they don’t have the book, you can get the pages through the interlibrary loan program.
native american records are discussed in pages 352-386.

Tracing ancestors among the Five Civilized Tribes: Southeastern Indians …
By Rachal Mills Lennon
this book could be accessed through the interlibary loan program also.

always find the state archives. some records are online, some records are not. but many times you can find a record not found in other places. you want to see also about newspaper mentions for obituaries, births, marriages in particular.

check courts for probate, civil and criminal cases, marriage records.

if your ancestors lived on a reservation, they might not appear on a federal census because they were not taxed.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
1860 census, indian territory.

this book is a good read about the dawes roll and how they implemented it.
The Dawes Commission and the allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914
By Kent Carter
and you can read this book online. your relatives’ testimony might be in the book.
http://www.archive.org/details/fivecivilizedtr00statgoog
see the menu at left. you can download it.
you should look at the enrollment application, census card and testimony. this post will tell you how to do that. these documents will tell you more about your heritage, but it won’t help you if your goal is to be enrolled in the choctaw tribe of oklahoma. some people were classed as mississippi choctaw if the family had a native heritage but didn’t qualify for enrollment in the tribe.

there are 63 tribes in oklahoma but only the five major tribes are on the dawes roll. look at your family’s location around 1900-1930 time period (census will help you there) and see if there was a tribe located nearby. it is possible that your relatives were affiliated with another tribe.

if they were mississippi choctaw, there is probably a land grant in MS/AL to a head of household called choctaw scrip land. this was given in lieu of tribal enrollment 1830-1880 time period. ancestry.com has a database of the MS and AL choctaw scrip land records, called mississippi or alabama land records. there are other land records in those databases too,, so you have to look at the authority/source cited. NARA http://www.archives.gov has those land record packages.

the mississippi choctaw was not removed from oklahoma. but they were largely rejected for tribal enrollment.

this website might help you in your search. some people are trying to transcribe applications.
http://www.us-census.org/native/choctaw_dawes.html
i do not know what they are trying to transcribe, but this is the volunteer page
http://www.us-census.org/states/graphics/status.htm

and this might be of interest to you:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/choctaw/rights-of-choctaws.htm
Rights of Mississippi Choctaws in the Choctaw Nation

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalrolls/
Index to the Final Rolls of the Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory
the dawes roll is composed of applications to the five major tribes in oklahoma.

good advice about native research:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research2.html

if your relatives came from a different geographic location or belonged to a different tribe, try searching google for the state and tribes. you might find a contact for a state-recognized tribe or a federal recognized tribe.

this page can help you set up a targeted google search.
http://www.searchforancestors.com/google/searcher.html

penny postcards. this is a website that features pictures that were on postcards. click on the state to see the postcards that they have.
http://www.usgwarchives.org/special/ppcs/ppcs.html
if you have a penny postcard, you can click on submissions to add your penny postcard to the collection.

these searches will combine several possible search terms and give you the best matches.

i have collected many resources over the years. if you want to write to me, shamlet76@gmail.com and request the choctaw resource list, i will be glad to send it to you.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

khembre khembre

posted on February 28, 2013

Thank you for the wealth of information!

khembre khembre

posted on April 23, 2013 and updated on April 23, 2013

I have married into a family with Native American Indian lineage. Very little family history was documented in my husband’s family. In fact my husband’s great grandparents denied their Indian heritage all together. I am in the process of restoring his family history and I would like to apply for Tribal membership and CDIB for my husband, (myself-by marriage?), and children.

If my research is accurate I have found approximately 3 ties to American Indian relatives. James Stewart is my husband’s 2nd great grandfather (possible Chickasaw or Cherokee, possibly by marriage?). Samuel Nashoba Jones (a.k.a: Jim Jones, James Jones, Neshoba Jones) is my husband’s 6th great grandfather. And Nitahotima Gordon his 5th great grandmother. (both are possibly Choctaw).

How can I find out which ancestor is the last to register with a Tribe and/or CDIB and therefore which birth and death certificates are needed to resume registration from that point to my children? It is a bit overwhelming to know what needs to happen next.

My husband’s living grandmother is:
i. Virginia Rose Jacobs. She currently resides in Shawnee, OK. (Her daughter Marian Rose Hembree is my husband’s mother. )
a. Virginia Rose is the daughter of Walter Adrian Weems and Elizabeth Stewart
i. Walter Adrian Weems is the son of John W. Weems and Violet L Morgan; he lived in Township 2, Choctaw Nation, I.T. in 1900 (age 14).
1. John W Weems is the son of John T Weems and Sirena Jackson; he lived in Township 2, Choctaw Nation, I.T. in 1900 (age 37).
a. Sirena Jackson is the daughter of William Jackson III and Amanda Jones; she lived in Township 2, Choctaw Nation, I.T. in 1900 (age 57).
i. William Jackson III is the son of William Jackson Jr. and Nitahotima; he was born in Choctaw Territory, Mississippi in 1812 and died near Boggy Depot, I.T. in 1870.
1. William Jackson Jr is the son of William Jackson Sr. and Margarett Barett; he was born in North Carolina in 1779. He married Nitahotima Notona Hotem Gordon (a.k.a. Cecelia Gordin) in Choctaw Nation, Missouri in 1792. He died in Carroll County, Mississippi in 1850.
ii. Amanda Jones is the daughter of Andrew Jones and Martha Giddens; she was born in Choctaw Territory, Mississippi in 1820 and died in Cornish, Chickasaw Nation, I.T. in 1899.
1. Andrew Jones is the son of Samuel Nashoba Jones and (Full Blood Choctaw; possibly Peggy Smith or Celia J Jones); he was born in Choctaw Territory, Mississippi in 1797 and died in Tyler, Smith Co., Texas in 1881.
1. Samuel Nashoba Jones was born in Okafalaya, Choctaw Territory, Mississippi in 1765 and died in Choctaw Territory, Mississippi in 1810.
ii. Elizabeth Stewart (born in Pontotoc, Chickasaw Nation, I.T., 1896) is the daughter of James W Stewart and Delphia Womble (a.k.a Elsie Stewart); she lived in Pontotoc, Chickasaw Nation, I.T. in 1900 (age 4).
NOTE: We believe James Stewart is Chickasaw or Cherokee. Born in Arkansas; he lived in Pontotoc, Chickasaw Nation, I.T. in 1900 (age 39) and died in the same area in 1940. This lineage would appear unrelated to the Mt Tabor community or Texas Choctaw tribe.

(the above information was in outline form and did not transfer to this post that way … for better visual open attachment.)

Can you tell me if it is possible to enroll? If so what needs to happen? And would I need CDIB first or would enrollment help us to get CDIB? Ultimately I would like CDIB and registration with one tribe in our lineage. We are proud of our Indian heritage. Any information would be appreciated.

attached:

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on April 24, 2013

you would have to check those names on accessgenealogy.com’s dawes index, and if you find that someone applied 1896-1906 to a tribe, then you would have to check the oklahoma historical society’s dawes webpage and see if that person was enrolled as a tribal member.

tribes enrolled 1896 and later, so you have to find an original enrollee who was alive around 1900 who applied to a tribe, so that you can be successful in applying for membership in that tribe yourself.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
be generous about names because of illiteracy or transcription errors. partial names are ok.
when you find a likely ancestor, click on the # in the card column and you can see the family group.
card#=family group
you should look at the guide to see the codes on the index to understand their meaning. for instance BB=by blood and P=parent.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes

some names are common, so you want to be sure it is your relative listed on the dawes roll.
there were over a million people living in indian territory/oklahoma in 1900 according to the federal census, but there were about 160,000 applicants to the five major tribes.

you should look at where your family was living 1900-1930 and see if there were any nearby tribes.

the dawes roll taken 1896-1906 in oklahoma/indian territory only lists the applicants to the five major tribes. there are 63 tribes in oklahoma.

usually, affiliation to someone who lived before tribal enrollments will not help you get enrolled. this is because the people living at the time of enrollment had the choice to live on the reservation under the authority of the tribe and may not have made the choice that you like. some people didn’t qualify for enrollment or couldn’t prove that they qualified for enrollment.

the choctaw tribe of oklahoma requires that you be directly related to an original enrollee of the tribe.

there are more choctaw tribes elsewhere also. tribal affiliation depends on in large part on location.

tribal enrollment and tribal affiliation/heritage are different topics.

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

start with what you know, gather documentation, then you can go backward in time. so get your birth certificate, your parents’ birth certificates and marriage license and then you can start on your grandparents. if someone passed away after 1/1/1937, they probably have a social security application on file. if you ask a government agency for a birth certificate, and they were born before 1929, they might have submitted a delayed birth certificate. death certificates, cemetery information and obituaries are helpful. you can usually get a copy of an obituary, newspaper mentions such as birth of a child or marriage, through the interlibrary loan program – see your local public library for this. i usually start with the death and work toward the person’s birth. military records and pension records can be helpful. census records can tell you where they were at particular times, names of family members. the census records up to 1940 are available, although the 1890 census was largely destroyed.

you will need to know who the family members were 1830-1930 or so, where they were located. a good way to do this is by census records.
the first time period to concentrate on is 1900-1930 because most tribes enrolled during this period.
federal census records can help you here. you can get access through your local public library – two databases: 1) heritage quest, 2) ancestry.com.

the dawes roll shows the applicants to the five major tribes 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma. if your family applied for this, there would be a census card, dawes application, other supporting documents and testimony. these are located at NARA
http://www.archives.gov
try the fort worth, TX office.

obituaries through the oklahoma choctaw tribe is through the history link for the tribe:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/

social security application for a deceased person:
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/html/foia_guide.htm
form SS-5.

your public library probably has a subscription to heritage quest and ancestry.com. fold3.com is another useful database for native records and military records, but they are a subscription. however, many times, their month’s subscription price is less than the price of a dawes packet. you can google fold3 and your ancestor’s name to see if your relative’s dawes packet is available at fold3.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
partial names are allowed.

bear in mind that many records are not online. always collect documents, as just the reference to a relative in an index informs you that a document is available.

death records:
death certificate: state vital records or if very old, state archives. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. you can look at death indices, such as the social security death index 1964-present for a date of death on rootsweb.com or ancestry.com.
obituary: see your local public library, interlibrary loan program. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. approximate date of death is helpful. if old, state historical society or state archives might have historical newspapers.
cemetery record: try findagrave.com or interment.net. ask for the person’s name at the time of death. if you find a relative, you can click on the county or cemetery to see if others with the same surname are buried there.

marriage records:
state vital records office, county clerk or if old, state archives or state historical society.

birth records:
state vital records office, or if old, state archives or state historical society. if the birth was before 1940, ask for a birth certificate or a delayed birth certificate. many people had to get delayed birth certificates when social security came into effect because they had to show proof of age. this will be under the name used at the time of birth.

census records:
you will want to search for census records 1940 on down to the birth of your relative. the federal census was taken every 10 years, however the 1890 census was largely destroyed by fire. there are also some state census records and native census records and native rolls. ancestry.com and heritage quest are two databases that include many census records. many native census records kept by NARA (http://www.archives.gov) are transcribed at accessgenealogy.

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
several helpful links for records in the choctaw territory

first of all, heritage and tribal enrollment are two different things. many times natives didn’t apply for enrollment because 1) they didn’t qualify, 2) they were philosophically opposed to enrollment, 3) they didn’t have documentation, or 4) they were mississippi choctaw and their ancestor had accepted land or benefits in lieu of tribal enrollment.

for those people who do not yet have a card, you should research the 1900-1940 census to know approximate dates of birth, birthplaces, family members. this will also tell you if someone is more likely to be on the freedman roll or as applicants to the dawes roll taken 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma for the five major tribes.

applicants can be found here:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
partial names are ok. look at the guide link for explanation of the codes.

when you find a possible name, then click on the card# in the card column to see the family group. if it is your family group, and they were likely enrolled, then you can search the oklahoma historical society’s dawes roll link to get the enrollment #’s for particular family members.
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes

if your family was enrolled by council action early in the process or was enrolled by lawsuit, they might not appear on the oklahoma historical society website. you would have to check with the tribe on that.

even if your family was rejected by the dawes process, you may want the testimony, census card, application information for your genealogical purposes.

the federal census will also help you decide which state to contact for vital records.

the dawes roll was taken 1896-1906, so you should trace your ancestors down to that time period. mostly, they had to be living in oklahoma by that time and agree to live there permanently.

history of the dawes roll
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Act
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Commission
wikipedia entries are sometimes opinionated; entered by volunteers.

helpful information about tribal enrollment
http://www.felihkatubbe.com/ChoctawNation/TribalMembership.html

freedmen information:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ewyatt/_borders/
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/F/FR016.html
http://www.african-nativeamerican.com/8-chocfreed.htm
http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes

2 ways to search:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
this will let you enter partial names to get card#. click on the card# in the card column and you can see other names in that family.
other resources on the left and at the bottom of this webpage. native census records and databases are especially useful.

http://www.okhistory.org/research/dawes/index.php
this will give you card# (family group) and enrollment #. they have some native marriage records too. other oklahoma records listed at left.
if your relative was enrolled by court action, their name might not be on this list.
if the name is common, you may find too many possible records.
you can order the dawes packet from the oklahoma historical society website.

if you find a relative listed on the dawes roll, fold3 may have filmed the record and could be available online.
http://www.fold3.com/documents/46580455/dawes-packets/
other resources are NARA http://www.archives.gov

the five civilized tribes book put out by the department of the interior has testimony.
http://books.google.com/books/about/Five_civilized_tribes_in_Oklahoma.html?id=chATAAAAYAAJ
and you can read it online

and these are the microfilms at fort worth TX archives.
http://www.archives.gov/southwest/finding-aids/native-american-microfilm.html

there may be additional records about your relative:
contact NARA http://www.archives.gov for these and other records listed on this webpage.

75.23 RECORDS OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES 1852-1919
75.23.1 Records of the Dawes Commission
75.23.2 Records of the U.S. Indian Inspector for Indian Territory
75.23.3 General records of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes
http://www.archives.gov/research/guide-fed-records/groups/075.html
(Record Group 75)
1793-1989

http://okhistory.cuadra.com/star/public.html
oklahoma newspaper and archives search. some of these resources may be available through interlibrary loan/public library.

the tribe has an excellent information to help you. it is found under genealogy advocacy.
http://choctawnation.com/services/departments/community-services/
some obituaries:
http://www.choctawnation.com/history/obituaries/

NARA http://www.archives.gov/ federal records repository. the fort worth, TX office has archives for oklahoma and texas tribes. atlanta/morrow office has archives for the southeast tribes. many offices have microfilmed records for several tribes. note that this web address has changed recently from nara.gov.

freedmen info:
You can ONLY apply for Choctaw Nation Membership, AFTER you have obtained a CDIB card proving your Choctaw Blood lineage to a direct ancestor who actually enrolled, BY BLOOD. Freedmen DID NOT enroll By Blood. When US Congress closed the Final Dawes Commission Rolls, there were no provisions granting Freedmen any benefits after the Dawes Commission closed. The tribe Constitution states BY BLOOD. however, the documents (application, census card and testimony) may help you find out more about your heritage.

about blood quantum laws:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_quantum_laws
calculations about blood quantum:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wishawa4/Menominee%20Indians/quantum.htm

mississippi choctaw and choctaw tribe explained here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Trail_of_Tears
http://www.choctaw.org/

jena choctaw tribe in louisiana:
http://www.jenachoctaw.org/

MOWA tribe
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1368
http://www.uab.edu/uabmagazine/2009/july/losttribe
http://www.native-american-online.org/MOWA-Choctaw.htm
MOWA Band Of Choctaws Wilford Taylor 1080 Red Fox Road Mount Vernon, AL 36560 (251) 829-5500. E-Mail: chieftaylor@mowachoctaw.com

other choctaw tribes:
http://www.aaanativearts.com/choctaw-indians/index.html

chickasaw historical society
Historic Preservation and Repatriation Office
Phone: (580) 272-5325
Fax: (580) 272-5327
2020 E. Arlington, Suite 4, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

chickasaw tribe
Chickasaw Nation Headquarters
520 East Arlington, Ada, OK 74820
Phone (580) 436-2603
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821
http://www.chickasaw.net/index.htm

chickasaw genealogy archive center Tribal Library
Phone: (580) 310-6477
Fax: (580) 559-0773
1003 Chamber Loop, Ada, OK 74820
send mail to: P.O. Box 1548, Ada, OK 74821

http://www.okhistory.org/
oklahoma historical society
marriage records
http://www.okhistory.org/research/library/marriage.html
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/chocmarriageindex.htm

other historical societies:
http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/SH-OK-NDX.html
some oklahoma genealogical societies:
http://www.censusfinder.com/oklahoma-genealogy-society.htm
http://www.geneasearch.com/societies/socokla.htm

texas tribes
http://www.native-languages.org/texas.htm
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/texas/index.htm
http://www.texasindians.com/
http://www.lsjunction.com/places/indians.htm

oklahoma tribes:
http://500nations.com/Oklahoma_Tribes.asp
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oklahoma/index.htm
http://www.cowboy.net/native/tribes.html
http://yvwiiusdinvnohii.net/OKTribes.htm

some links for the choctaw.
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/choctaw/index.htm
i looked at the land records and those need a lot of work. i have no information about whether or when they will improve some of these categories.

types of records available for native americans:
pages 366-369 in particular although the entire native american chapter is helpful.
The Genealogist’s Companion and Sourcebook:
Guide to the Resources You Need for Unpuzzling Your Past
Emily Anne Croom
you can ask for these particular pages from your local public library. if they don’t have the book, you can get the pages through the interlibrary loan program.
native american records are discussed in pages 352-386.

Tracing ancestors among the Five Civilized Tribes: Southeastern Indians …
By Rachal Mills Lennon
this book could be accessed through the interlibary loan program also.

always find the state archives. some records are online, some records are not. but many times you can find a record not found in other places. you want to see also about newspaper mentions for obituaries, births, marriages in particular.

check courts for probate, civil and criminal cases, marriage records.

if your ancestors lived on a reservation, they might not appear on a federal census because they were not taxed.
http://www.okgenweb.org/~okgarvin/kinard/1860index.htm
1860 census, indian territory.

this book is a good read about the dawes roll and how they implemented it.
The Dawes Commission and the allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914
By Kent Carter
and you can read this book online. your relatives’ testimony might be in the book.
http://www.archive.org/details/fivecivilizedtr00statgoog
see the menu at left. you can download it.
you should look at the enrollment application, census card and testimony. this post will tell you how to do that. these documents will tell you more about your heritage, but it won’t help you if your goal is to be enrolled in the choctaw tribe of oklahoma. some people were classed as mississippi choctaw if the family had a native heritage but didn’t qualify for enrollment in the tribe.

there are 63 tribes in oklahoma but only the five major tribes are on the dawes roll. look at your family’s location around 1900-1930 time period (census will help you there) and see if there was a tribe located nearby. it is possible that your relatives were affiliated with another tribe.

if they were mississippi choctaw, there is probably a land grant in MS/AL to a head of household called choctaw scrip land. this was given in lieu of tribal enrollment 1830-1880 time period. ancestry.com has a database of the MS and AL choctaw scrip land records, called mississippi or alabama land records. there are other land records in those databases too,, so you have to look at the authority/source cited. NARA http://www.archives.gov has those land record packages.

the mississippi choctaw was not removed from oklahoma. but they were largely rejected for tribal enrollment.

this website might help you in your search. some people are trying to transcribe applications.
http://www.us-census.org/native/choctaw_dawes.html
i do not know what they are trying to transcribe, but this is the volunteer page
http://www.us-census.org/states/graphics/status.htm

and this might be of interest to you:
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/choctaw/rights-of-choctaws.htm
Rights of Mississippi Choctaws in the Choctaw Nation

http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalrolls/
Index to the Final Rolls of the Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory
the dawes roll is composed of applications to the five major tribes in oklahoma.

good advice about native research:
http://jenniferhsrn2.homestead.com/research2.html

if your relatives came from a different geographic location or belonged to a different tribe, try searching google for the state and tribes. you might find a contact for a state-recognized tribe or a federal recognized tribe.

this page can help you set up a targeted google search.
http://www.searchforancestors.com/google/searcher.html

penny postcards. this is a website that features pictures that were on postcards. click on the state to see the postcards that they have.
http://www.usgwarchives.org/special/ppcs/ppcs.html
if you have a penny postcard, you can click on submissions to add your penny postcard to the collection.

these searches will combine several possible search terms and give you the best matches.

i have collected many resources over the years. if you want to write to me, shamlet76@gmail.com and request the choctaw resource list, i will be glad to send it to you.

i am just a volunteer that wants to empower people to learn how to do genealogy.

suzanne hamlet shatto

khembre khembre

posted on June 25, 2013

Suzanne I’ve finally had more time to look through the information you’ve provided.

I believe I’ve found them on the 1896 Applications for Enrollment and the Dawes Final Rolls. How do I go about proving that the name I see on the Dawes Final Roll is in fact our ancestor?

I am referring to: Card 3202; Roll #1254 and #9265 for James W Stewart and Nancy E. Stewart. I am hoping it is Nancy Elsie Stewart as the name we know her as is Elsie. The ages are within range. As of 1902 James W Stewart would be: 41 yo and Elsie Stewart would be: 41 yo. On the Dawes Roll they are listed as 57 and 41 yo.

James W Stewart and Elsie Stewart as of 1900 Census live in Indian Territory, Chickasaw Nation, Township 1 South Range 6. But, do not find them if I search by name under the Chickasaw Tribe. Elsie also appears as Delpia or Delpha Stewart on 1910 and 1920 census. James and Elsie both lived in Pontotoc, Harris and Ash Flat,OK. I do not know when they died or where they are buried. 1920 Census is the last information I can find on Elsie and 1940 is the last I find on James. It would appear that Elsie died before 1940.

Their daughter Elizabeth Josephine (Stewart)Weems is my husband’s great grandmother. She died in Shawnee OK in 1972. She denied her indian heritage for fear of ending up in the reservation. I do not find any ‘Weems’ on the rolls. Her husband Walter Adrian Weems was born in Cornish,Chickasaw Nation but was living in Choctaw Nation, Township 2 during the 1900 Census. I have SS# for both Elizabeth and Walter Weems. I also have a delayed birth certificate for Elizabeth. Both of them lived and died in Shawnee, OK.

Any advice on what to do next?

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on June 26, 2013

first, you have to verify that one of the people that is the ancestor successfully was enrolled in the choctaw tribe.

do you find them on the link i gave you in the first post?
http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/finalroll.php
you can enroll if you are DIRECTLY related to an original enrollee of the tribe.
the 1896 process stopped and started again with different procedures. only a few were enrolled under the 1896 process but those few are listed on the oklahoma historical society list.
so if your ancestors applied to the tribe, then you check the oklahoma historical society for their name and see if they successfully enrolled.

one indication of tribal enrollment was if your family owned land in 1910. if your family was renting, it is unlikely that they succeeded in the enrollment process.

Dawes Card Information

tribe last first middle age sex blood card roll misc type
Choctaw Stewart Anna 0 F 3202 P
Choctaw Stewart Joseph O 0 M 3202 P
Choctaw Stewart Nancy F 0 F 3202 P
Choctaw Stewart Wiley 0 M 3202 P
Choctaw Stewart Nancy E 38 F 5/16 3202 NR KREBBS BB
Choctaw Stewart James W 52 M IW 3202 NR KREBBS BB
bb-by blood
p=parent
iw=intermarried white, a general nontribal description.

if you think this is your relative, then get a copy of the dawes packet and see what it says. fold3.com or oklahoma historical society or NARA http://www.archives.gov would have these.

read the FAQs on the choctaw nation website (oklahoma).
http://www.choctawnation.com/services/departments/
see the enrollment department.

suzanne hamlet shatto

khembre khembre

posted on February 27 and updated on February 27

Suzanne,
I have recently found a cousin in Marlow who is also a descendant of Samual Nashoba Jones or Woody Jim Jones. She is a great granddaughter of Winborn B. Jones. She has provided me a copy of her CDIB and of Winborn’s Choctaw Roll enrollment. He was added on Roll 16,017 via Testimony from Winburn Jones (William C.Thompson et al vs. Choctaw Nation). Samuel Nashoba Jones is referred to in this document. It is stated he was full blood Choctaw Indian. Winburn Jones, son of Woody Jones II, son of Woody Solomon Jones, Sr., son of Woody Jim Jones (alias: Samuel Nashoba Jones). My Ancestor is Andrew Jones; a brother or half brother of Woody Solomon Jones, Sr. Is it possible to apply for Choctaw membership and/or CDIB with this information if I can provide birth and death certificates back to Andrew Jones?

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on February 27

is this the person on the dawes roll?
card 5997 choctaw tribe:

Surname First Name Type Sex Age Blood %
Jones Mary P (Parent) F
Jones Woody P (Parent) M
Jones Winburn BB (By Blood) M 45 15/3
Jones Fannie BB (By Blood) F 42 IW
Jones Peter N BB (By Blood) M 21 15/6
Jones Eslie BB (By Blood) F 19 15/6
Jones Thomas BB (By Blood) M 17 15/6
Jones Maude C BB (By Blood) F 14 15/6
Jones Jesse H BB (By Blood) M 12 15/6
Jones Sallie BB (By Blood) F 11 15/6
Jones Paul BB (By Blood) M 4 15/6

p-parent
bb=by blood

the short answer to your question about the 1896 application is that the dawes process restarted. if your relative had successfully enrolled in the tribe, then they would be listed as an original enrollee.

so consider the 1896 applications as separate.

so you have to find a direct ancestor who was accepted as a member of the choctaw tribe. this means that the person would have to have been alive in the 1900-1910 time period.

i am having a little problem trying to follow your genealogy, so please excuse my assumptions.

there are a number of possible records under woody jones. and woody might be a nickname.

JONES, Woody Chickasaw enrollment D183 More Info
JONES, Woody Choctaw enrollment D593 More Info
JONES, Woody Choctaw enrollment R148 More Info
JONES, Woody Choctaw enrollment MCR310 More Info
JONES, Woody Choctaw enrollment MCR557 More Info
JONES, Woody Choctaw enrollment 5997 More Info
JONES, Woody Choctaw enrollment 5027 More Info
JONES, Woody Choctaw enrollment 5035 More Info

there are also a number of andrew jones records.

Matches 1 – 6 of 6
(Click on the column heading to reorder the output)
Name Age Tribe Record Type Card # More Info
JONES, Andrew 14 Choctaw enrollment 4270 More Info
JONES, Andrew 9 Choctaw enrollment 4786 More Info
JONES, Andrew J 18 Cherokee enrollment 6960 More Info
JONES, Andrew J Choctaw enrollment MCR6138 More Info
JONES, Andrew J Choctaw enrollment MCR6948 More Info
JONES, Andrew J A 1 Cherokee enrollment 121 More Info

then there are the stewarts:
I am referring to: Card 3202; Roll #1254 and #9265 for James W Stewart and Nancy E. Stewart. I am hoping it is Nancy Elsie Stewart as the name we know her as is Elsie. The ages are within range. As of 1902 James W Stewart would be: 41 yo and Elsie Stewart would be: 41 yo. On the Dawes Roll they are listed as 57 and 41 yo.

i will use this family to show you how to do it. you can look up anyone else using this method.

http://www.ancestrypaths.com/five-civilized-tribes/
Reel 0017 Choctaw by Blood 3163-3301

the card#3202 is about 25% into the microfilm. they are arranged by card#.

james stewart is an intermarried white. nancy is applying as his spouse. so neither of these people are native.
james stewart was a drinker and abusive and they separated.
in his affidavit, he says nancy was choctaw, #9265 enrollment.

Name Age Sex Blood Card No. Tribe Roll No.
Nancy E. Stewart 41 Female 5/16 Card #3202 Choctaw by Blood Roll #9265

is this your direct ancestor?

my question is that it appears that nancy and james stewart didn’t have any children. so how are you related to these people?

ok, let’s start at the beginning again.

Samuel Nashoba Jones—>Andrew Jones—>Amanda Jones →Sirena Jackson→John William Weems—>Walter Adrian Weems—>Virginia Rose Weems—>Marian Rose Jacobs—>Russell Hembree (my husband).

samuel nashoba jones is going back way too far.
your lineage does not include dates/locations/spouse. this is a handicap.
i don’t see any stewarts in here. so i don’t understand why i was looking up stewarts.

you find people in the 1900 census.

1900 United States Federal Census about John W Weems
Name: John W Weems
Age: 37
Birth Date: abt 1863
Birthplace: Arkansas
Home in 1900: Township 2, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse’s Name: Violet L Weems
Occupation: View on Image
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
John W Weems 37
Violet L Weems 30
Walter A Weems 13
Arthur L Weems 11
Ophelia M Weems 9
Nettie G Weems 7
Otis Weems 5
Willie O Weems 3
Herbert Weems 10/12
Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 2, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory; Roll: 1853; Enumeration District: 0182; FHL microfilm: 1241853.

federal population schedule and not on the indian population schedule
john w. weems, head, white male, b. feb. 1863, age 37, married 14 years, b. AR, father b. TN, mother b. MS, farmer, doesn’t read or write, rents a farm
violet l.?, wife, white female, b. jan. 1870, age 30, married 14 years, had 7 children who all survive, b. AR, parents b. unknown, doesn’t read or write
walter a., son, white male, b. dec. 1886, age 13, single, b. indian territory, doesn’t read or write, farm laborer
arthur l., son, white male, b. july 1888, age 11, single, b. indian territory, farm laborer, doesn’t read or write
ophelia m., daughter, white female, b. mar, 1891, age 9, single, b. indian territory
nettie g., daughter, white female,, b. feb. 1893, age 7, single b. indian territory
otis, son, white male, b. apr. 1895, age 5, single b. indian territory
willie o., daughter, white female, b. apr. 1897, age 3, single b. indian territory
herbert, son, white male, b. july 1899, age 10 months, single b. indian territory

ok, this does not appear to be native. people were drawn to the indian territory because of land rushes and business opportunities.

1910 United States Federal Census about Violet Weems
Name: Violet Weems
Age in 1910: 37
Birth Year: abt 1873
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1910: Bradley, Grady, Oklahoma
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Marital Status: Married
Spouse’s Name: William Weems
Father’s Birthplace: Texas
Mother’s Birthplace: Texas
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
William Weems 77
47
Violet Weems 37
Walter Weems 23
Lute Weems 21
Myrtle Weems 19
Nettie Weems 16
Otta Weems 14
Willie Weems 12
Herbert Weems 10
Carmel Weems 7
Velma Weems 2
Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Bradley, Grady, Oklahoma; Roll: T624_1252; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 0091; FHL microfilm: 1375265.

they are still renting a farm. this was after enrollments. so this family did not successfully enroll.

these are the only weems, but you can see that these are not your family.
Name: Weems, George
Tribe: Cherokee
Record Type: enrollment
Sex: M
Enrollment Type: P (Parent)
Card No.: 5922

Credit belongs to the staff of SW National Archives, Fort Worth, Texas, who compiled the names from the Dawes Enrollment Cards for its National Archives
Others with this Family:
Surname First Name Type Sex Age Blood %
Benge Mack P (Parent) M
Factor Margaret P (Parent) F
Weems George P (Parent) M
Weems George W BB (By Blood) M 39 IW
Weems Jennie BB (By Blood) F 30 1/2

and they are not listed on the dawes roll.
the 1910 census says that violet’s parents were b. TX.

they could have been native but if they were living off-reservation, it would have been difficult to prove native heritage during the dawes commission.

i don’t know if you have other relatives to look up. but this is how you do it.

Native American Data for Winburn Jones

Name: Jones, Winburn
Tribe: Choctaw
Record Type: enrollment
Age: 45
Sex: M
Enrollment Type: BB (By Blood)
Blood %: 15/3
Card No.: 5997
Roll No.: NR

Credit belongs to the staff of SW National Archives, Fort Worth, Texas, who compiled the names from the Dawes Enrollment Cards for its National Archives
Others with this Family:
Surname First Name Type Sex Age Blood %
Jones Mary P (Parent) F
Jones Woody P (Parent) M
Jones Winburn BB (By Blood) M 45 15/3
Jones Fannie BB (By Blood) F 42 IW
Jones Peter N BB (By Blood) M 21 15/6
Jones Eslie BB (By Blood) F 19 15/6
Jones Thomas BB (By Blood) M 17 15/6
Jones Maude C BB (By Blood) F 14 15/6
Jones Jesse H BB (By Blood) M 12 15/6
Jones Sallie BB (By Blood) F 11 15/6
Jones Paul BB (By Blood) M 4 15/6

this case starts on film record 1935 on this roll
Reel 0040 Choctaw by Blood 5952-6009
this is a long case, as there was a court decision/attorney general opinion.

looking at the weems and stewart census and dawes roll, i don’t think they are your family.

so going back to the ancestry.com family trees:

Elizabeth Josephine Stewart
Birth April 22, 1896 in Johnston, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma
Death October 1, 1972 in Shawnee, Pottawatomie, Oklahoma, USA

and here they are in the 1900 census:
1900 United States Federal Census about Elizabeth Stewart
Name: Elizabeth Stewart
Age: 4
Birth Date: abt 1896
Birthplace: Indian Territory, Oklahoma
Home in 1900: Pontotoc, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Daughter
Father’s Name: James Stewart
Mother’s name: Elsie Stewart
Occupation: View on Image
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
James Stewart 38
Elsie Stewart 38
Alton Stewart 9
Luther Stewart 6
Elizabeth Stewart 4
Fernando Mason 56
Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Pontotoc, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory; Roll: 1847; Enumeration District: 0122; FHL microfilm: 1241847.

on the federal population schedule, not the indian population schedule
james w. stewart, head, white male, b. aug. 1861, age 38, married 10 years, b. AR, parents b. TN, proprietor of a grocery store, reads and writes, owns the house
elsie, wife, white female, b. oct. 1861, age 38, married 10 years, had 4 children but only 3 are alive, b. AR, father b. MS, mother b. TN, reads and writes
alton, son, white male, b. jan 1891, age 9, single, b. indian territory
luther, son, white male, b. oct. 1893, age 6, single, b. indian territory
elizabeth, daughter, white female b. apr 1896, age 4, single b. indian territory.

so we wasted some time looking at unrelated people in the dawes roll.
there is no alton stewart on the dawes roll.

1910 United States Federal Census about Thomas L Stewart
Name: Thomas L Stewart
Age in 1910: 16
Birth Year: abt 1894
Birthplace: Oklahoma
Home in 1910: Harris, Johnston, Oklahoma
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Son
Marital Status: Single
Father’s Name: James W Stewart
Father’s Birthplace: Arkansas
Mother’s name: Depha A Stewart
Mother’s Birthplace: Arkansas
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
James W Stewart 48
Depha A Stewart 48
Thomas L Stewart 16
Lizzie J Stewart 14
Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Harris, Johnston, Oklahoma; Roll: T624_1254; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 0125; FHL microfilm: 1375267.

on the federal population schedule 1910
james w. stewart, head, white male, age 48, married once for 20 years, b. AR, parents b. TN, hotel proprietor, reads and writes
delpha a., wife, white female, age 48, married twice?, this time for 20 years, had 4 children but only 3 survive, b. AR, parents b. united states, cook at the boarding house, reads and writes
thomas l., son, white male, age 16, single b. oklahoma, well driller, reads and writes and attends school
lizzie j.,daughter, white female, age 14, single, b. Oklahoma, reads and writes and attends school.

1920 United States Federal Census about James Stewart
Name: James Stewart
[James Stwart]
Age: 71
Birth Year: abt 1849
Birthplace: Oklahoma
Home in 1920: Garrett, Johnston, Oklahoma
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse’s Name: Lilia Stewart
Father’s Birthplace: Oklahoma
Mother’s name: Seilie Stewart
Mother’s Birthplace: Oklahoma
Home Owned: Rent
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
James Stewart 71
Lilia Stewart 50
Seilie Stewart 73
Source Citation: Year: 1920; Census Place: Garrett, Johnston, Oklahoma; Roll: T625_1464; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 85; Image: 813.

on the federal population schedule 1920
james w. stewart, head, rents a farm, white male, age 71, married, b. oklahoma
leila, wife, white male, married, b. alabama, parents b. alabama
seilie, mother, white female, age 73, widow, b. AR, parents b. AR

i don’t know if this is your family or not. some info doesn’t match.

another ancestry family tree says this is the spouse:
Delilah Ann Barton
1868 – 1946

maybe this is spouse 2?

this is why i start with the death and work backwards in time. childrens’ records point to the parents, fix the family to a date and location.

you should get a copy of one of the childrens’ delayed birth certificate from state vital records. this will give you the maiden name of the mother and the father’s name, locations and date of birth.

as for thinking that your family might be enrolled, i see no signs of that. the family was not living in a native area and not on the indian population schedule. rather, they were living in a non-native area in 1900.

they might be native but maybe they could not submit sufficient proof of heritage to meet membership requirements of the tribe.

Choctaw Nation Genealogy Choctaw Nation Genealogy

posted on February 27

Our office searches for original Choctaw enrollees on The Final Dawes Commission Roll Book. To be on the Dawes Roll, a person must have been living in Indian Territory (pre-Oklahoma) with the tribe between 1898-1906. Contact genealogy@choctawnation.com and we will see if we can help.

khembre khembre

posted on February 28

I will email Choctaw genealogy soon! Thanks!

Suzanne, you are so diligent! I feel so guilty that you do so much work as a volunteer! You truly are a blessing. I appreciate your research and learn a lot from your lengthy, detailed responses.

Your initial response for Winburn Jones: Card 5997 Choctaw tribe is the person I am referring to. This person, with that wife and those children would be a half brother or brother to my person; Andrew Jones. Woody Jones Sr. and Andrew Jones share the same father; Samuel Nashoba Jones but may have different mothers. Since Nashoba was full-blood Choctaw I would assume all of his children would be part indian regardless of which of the possible wives were their mother. I just wondered if Winburn could claim citizenship if it would be possible that a ‘cousin’ could also claim citizenship.

The Woody and Andrew names you found would have been a few generations younger than ours. Our Woody and Andrew would have been born late 1700s to early 1800. I guess that is why I am asking because Winborn applied after the first Dawes even though none of his ancestors were on the Dawes and he was accepted. So why can’t lineage from Andrew be accepted in the same manner if from the same ancestor; Samuel Nashoba Jones.

As for the Stewart family; I started researching them because growing up Great Grandmother Elizabeth Stewart was referred to as ‘indian’ but she denied her indian heritage as did my husband’s grandmother. I married into the family and I am the one initiating the research. I value heritage and I want to learn all I can about my husband’s family for our children’s sake. I did not learn of the Jones family until I began researching my husband’s family tree. Would it be possible to lie on the census claiming ‘white’ when in reality being indian? Especially if only a % indian such that physical appearance would not be as obvious?

Elizabeth Stewart Weems and Walter Adrian Weems were the only ones living during the time of the Dawes Roll.

The Jones family would trace to our great-grandfather, Walter Adrian Weems. The Stewart family would trace to our great-grandmother, Elizabeth Stewart. The Stewart family is untraceable beyond James W. Stewart. One family member who also researched this line said it was ‘lost’ at the ‘Trail of Tears’. The info you provided for James Stewart matches what I have.

The children Alton, Thomas L (Luther) and Elizabeth (Lizzy) are all correct. Alton would have been 19 by the 1910 census and therefore most likely no longer at home.

The wife(s) … Elsie is the name my mother in-law remembers but the delayed birth certificate for Elizabeth does say Delpha and the death certificate says Delphia. It has been my experience in translation of these documents that errors occur … if even in the original handwriting or type; names are spelt incorrectly. So i would not be surprised if Lilia & Delilah are the same person as Delphia & and probably Elsie too.

So, if I understand you correctly, since I can not find any relative on the Dawes Roll that means we cannot apply for Choctaw citizenship … regardless of the fact we have a distant cousin who did apply later and was approved?

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on March 1

in order to become a member of the choctaw tribe of oklahoma, you would have to be directly descended from an original enrollee in the tribe.

tribes enrolled natives in the 1900-1940 time period. this is why you need to find your family in the 1900-1940 census records.

the only elizabeth stewart on the dawes roll was 36 at the time that she applied 1896-1906. obviously this was not your elizabeth stewart. from the 1900 census, your elizabeth stewart was 4 years old. and there is no alton stewart on the dawes roll.

there is no walter weems on the dawes roll.

you need to read about the dawes roll and the purpose of the dawes roll. the tribe did not enroll people who were deceased.

when i read your posts, it appears that you are trying to find people in the 1700-early 1800 time period. this will not help you with enrollment. there was no tribal enrollment in this time period.

some people consider natives as caucasians. some people were psychologically opposed to enrollment, some people could not find documentation or evidence of native heritage. some people lived elsewhere. some people who had lived off-reservation could not show that they were affiliated with a tribe 100 years later. and these circumstances occurred in many families.

the enrollment of a distant cousin will not help you get enrolled.

you might be able to find evidence that someone in the family was native. but i don’t know where your family lived 1800-1880. if they were living off-reservation, they would be on the federal census records.

1870 United States Federal Census about John W Neems
Name: John W Neems
[John W Weems]
Age in 1870: 7
Birth Year: abt 1863
Birthplace: Arkansas
Home in 1870: Horsehead, Johnson, Arkansas
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Clarksville
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
John T Neems 31
Serena J Neems 25
John W Neems 7
Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Horsehead, Johnson, Arkansas; Roll: M593_57; Page: 41B; Image: 88; Family History Library Film: 545556.

1870 United States Federal Census about John T Neems
Name: John T Neems
[John T Weems]
Age in 1870: 31
Birth Year: abt 1839
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1870: Horsehead, Johnson, Arkansas
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Clarksville

john t. weems was b. TN and there were no reservations in TN. he might not be a choctaw. he was living off-reservation since he was born.

1870 United States Federal Census about Serena J Neems
Name: Serena J Neems
[Serena J Weems]
Age in 1870: 25
Birth Year: abt 1845
Birthplace: Mississippi
Home in 1870: Horsehead, Johnson, Arkansas
Race: White
Gender: Female
Post Office: Clarksville

serena might be a choctaw and her family may have been living on a MS reservation. however, the family did not go on the trail of tears in the late 1830s from MS to OK.

Arkansas, County Marriages Index, 1837-1957 about John T Wimms
Name: John T Wimms
[John T Weems]
Gender: Male
Age: 21
Birth Year: abt 1840
Residence: LaFayette, Arkansas
Spouse’s Name: Sirena Jackson
Spouse’s Gender: Female
Spouse’s Age: 17
Spouse’s Residence: LaFayette, Arkansas
Marriage Date: 27 Sep 1861
Marriage County: LaFayette
Event Type: Marriage
FHL Film Number: 1004492

Sirena Jackson Carlton
Birth: Oct. 17, 1843
Mississippi, USA
Death: Mar. 2, 1913
Pontotoc County
Oklahoma, USA

1900 United States Federal Census about Cyrena Carlton
Name: Cyrena Carlton
Age: 56
Birth Date: abt 1844
Birthplace: Mississippi
Home in 1900: Township 2, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Spouse’s Name: George Carlton
Occupation: View on Image
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members:
Name Age
George Carlton
Cyrena Carlton 56
Mallie Carlton 15
Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 2, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory; Roll: 1853; Enumeration District: 0182; FHL microfilm: 1241853.

and serena carlton also did not apply for enrollment.

Burial:
Pontotoc Cemetery
Johnston County
Oklahoma, USA

Created by: Dana Meeks
Record added: Sep 03, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 96470643

1860 United States Federal Census about John T Wims
Name: John T Wims
[John T Weems]
Age in 1860: 20
Birth Year: abt 1840
Birthplace: Tennessee
Home in 1860: Red River, Lafayette, Arkansas
Gender: Male
Post Office: Rondo
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
Richd Wims 53
Nancy A Wims 44
John T Wims 20
Amanda E Wims 18
Indiana T Wims 12
Richd W Wims 8
Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Red River, Lafayette, Arkansas; Roll: M653_45; Page: 100; Image: 100; Family History Library Film: 803045.

1860 United States Federal Census about Serena Jackson
Name: Serena Jackson
Age in 1860: 17
Birth Year: abt 1843
Birthplace: Mississippi
Home in 1860: Red River, Lafayette, Arkansas
Gender: Female
Post Office: Rondo
Value of real estate: View image
Household Members:
Name Age
Wm Mitchell 14
Wm Jackson 46
Amanda Jackson 38
Serena Jackson 17
Arbizena Jackson 15
Roena Jackson 15
Henderson G Jackson 12
Alfred Jackson 7
Asenia Jackson 7
Lucien Jackson 3
Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Red River, Lafayette, Arkansas; Roll: M653_45; Page: 99; Image: 99; Family History Library Film: 803045.

i think william mitchell was a mistake and should have been included in the previous family.

william jackson was b. GA.
all of the children were b. MS except for lucien who was b. AR.

so this is the migration.

1850 United States Federal Census about William Jackson
Name: William Jackson
Age: 35
Birth Year: abt 1815
Birthplace: Georgia
Home in 1850: District 13, Panola, Mississippi
Gender: Male
Family Number: 431
Household Members:
Name Age
William Jackson 35
Amanda Jackson 27
Sarah Jackson 7
Runa Jackson 5
Arbezina Jackson 5
Henderson G Jackson 3
Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: District 13, Panola, Mississippi; Roll: M432_379; Page: 337B; Image: 296.

Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935 about Amanda Jones
Name: Amanda Jones
Spouse: William Jackson
Marriage Date: 21 Dec 1841
County: Carroll

maybe william jackson accepted a scrip land grant in lieu of tribal enrollment in MS. you have panola and carroll county as a location.

All Mississippi, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908 results for William Jackson
this is the name of the database on ancestry.com

it contains homestead records and choctaw scrip records.

so you will have to look through this database, match the location to the census record, and see if there is a choctaw scrip land record.

Mississippi, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908 about William A Jackson
Name: William A Jackson
Land Office: Columbus
Document Number: 24444
Total Acres: 163.75
Signature: Yes
Canceled Document: No
Issue Date: 10 Sep 1844
Mineral Rights Reserved: No
Metes and Bounds: No
Statutory Reference: 3 Stat. 566
Multiple Warantee Names: No
Act or Treaty: April 24, 1820
Multiple Patentee Names: No
Entry Classification: Sale-Cash Entries
Land Description: 1 ESE CHOCTAW No 19N 6E 15; 2 SWSE CHOCTAW No 19N 6E 15; 3 SESW CHOCTAW No 19N 6E 15
Source Information:
United States, Bureau of Land Management. Mississippi, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1997.
Original data: United States, Bureau of Land Management. Mississippi Pre-1908 Patents: Homesteads, Cash Entry, Choctaw Indian Scrip and Chickasaw Cession Lands. General Land Office Automated Records Project, 1997.

that is an example. i don’t know if this is your relative or not. but i wanted to show you what to look for in the source.

choctaw is a county in MS.

1 ESE CHOCTAW No 19N 6E 15
this says choctaw county, township 19 north, range 6 east, section 15, ESE corner of this section.
http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/
it might show you the deed, but you only want to look at that if you think this is your relative. the choctaw scrip land records have supporting documents.

and there might not be a deed. they may have rented the farm.

All Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850-1880 results for William Jackson
match it to the william jackson records in this database, under census records on ancestry.com.

if they rent, they will not be in this database.

suzanne

suzanne hamlet shatto

khembre khembre

posted on March 4

Wow, you are amazing!

If I can prove the above scrip land grant is my William Jackson (and I believe it may be!) then does that help or not help me prove Native American descent?

I found a website
http://researchingchoctaw-scrip-5-stat513.blogspot.com/
but it is a bit confusing.

I found the Patent on the Bureau of Land Management website and William A Jackson would be 32 at the time of this document which is likely. I have printed and saved copies of the document for my records. And being born in Choctaw county, MS it makes sense that this is the correct relative.

Please forgive my ignorance but why is it that only the Native Americans who enrolled on the Dawes Roll can claim tribal citizenship? What about those that chose not to? If you didn’t enroll did that mean you were no longer considered Native American? It is well documented that Samuel Nashoba Jones (aka Jim Jones) was full blood Choctaw.

Would it be easier to bring all my research to Oklahoma in person? What office or location would be the best one to help me?

Texasblue Texasblue

posted on March 4

My heart about stopped when I saw your James ‘Jim’ Jones and Choctaw linked. MY James ‘Jim’ J. Jones was married to Gertrude Katherine Stone b. 1860 Grayson Co., TX. She was last child of Catherine Orlinda Brown who married Banister Stone. Banister cannot be found after 1855 when the next to last child was born. Five years later, MY Kate was born and possibly had a different father.. Choctaw?
1940 Census shows first written proof of Native American heritage, but Kate’s children’s pictures tell another tale. All look Native American even tho no registration was ever done. YOUR Jim Jones is NOT mine, but it was quite breathtaking to see that name the first time I visited this site.
Donna Jones Hernandez

attached:

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on March 4

khembre,
look at the location of your william jackson in the census year after the land purchase. match this to the location of the land purchase. use county, township, range, section. then decide if it was likely. if it was, then you want to look to see the land packet, as it will give you more information about heritage, if this is a choctaw scrip land.

william jackson is a common name, so figure out whether it is your william jackson.

the 1850 and 1860 agricultural census (on ancestry.com) might be helpful to match with the # of acres purchased.

the land grants were given in lieu of tribal enrollment because the natives chose not to go to indian territory/oklahoma during the trail of tears.

the dawes roll was taken in 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma and includes the names of applicants to the five major tribes of oklahoma. if your ancestors did not go to oklahoma in this time period, they would probably not apply to an oklahoma tribe. the dawes roll was confirmed in 1907 and revisited in 1914 by congress.

the tribe accepts members who can show that they descend from original enrollees in the tribe by blood. this enrollment process occurred 1896-1906 in indian territory/oklahoma. oklahoma became a state in 1907.

there are other choctaw tribes. location is a major indication of tribal affiliation, so you have to find your ancestors and their location. then inquire to nearby native tribes.

many tribes enrolled in the 1900-1940 time period. if you have an ancestor that was enrolled in a tribe, this is the time period that you should search. not before 1890.

tribal heritage and tribal enrollment are two different topics. you are probably thinking of tribe as different than a tribe in a particular state. the tribes are located in particular states.

you should read about the significance of the dawes roll.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawes_Rolls
this was how the five major tribes enrolled members.
there are 63 tribes in oklahoma, so location is important.
natives had to agree to live under the authority of the tribe.

tribal heritage is a wider topic, one of cultural/philosophical significance. this does not include enrollment.

texas was not on the trail of tears but there were many unofficial migrations from the southeastern area to/through texas.

tribes did not enroll deceased natives. tribes did not look at the heritage of deceased natives, except as it impacted the natives who applied for enrollment.

your samuel nashoba jones was born around 1775 and passed away 1810-1814. this was before the tribes enrolled natives. there was no enrollment process in his lifetime, so he couldn’t have enrolled in a tribe.

the website is listing the different native sources of information located at NARA http://www.archives.gov

if you need help with this, you should go to a local genealogical society and see if someone has experience with homestead records or native records located at NARA.

if ancestors did not enroll in a tribe, then they can continue to think of themselves as native but probably wouldn’t qualify for native preference or native scholarships or native benefits given to their members by a particular tribe.

suzanne hamlet shatto

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on March 4

texasblue, you should start a new thread if you have an inquiry about your ancestors. people do look at new posts to see if they are related to you, if they have information to help you.

Alabama, Marriage Collection, 1800-1969 about Catherine Brown
Name: Catherine Brown
Spouse: Banister Stone
Marriage Date: 11 Dec 1841
County: Limestone
State: Alabama
Source information: Hunting For Bears

findagrave memorial for catherine orlinda brown stone
Birth: 1823
Morgan County
Alabama, USA
Death: Jan. 15, 1909

CATHERINE ORLINDA BROWN married Banister Stone in 1841 in Blount County, Alabama. She moved to Grayson County, Texas, with her children by 1859. Her husband, Banister Stone, enlisted in the Army in the Civil War in his home state of Tennessee. After her husband was killed in 1865, she raised all her children alone. He was buried in the Confederate Cemetery at Camp Chase, Ohio.

Inscription:
Grandma Stone
Died Jan 15, 1909
Age 85 yrs

Burial:
Duncan Municipal Cemetery
Duncan
Stephens County
Oklahoma, USA
Plot: Blk 7

Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

Created by: Jean
Record added: Nov 24, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 16765834

an obituary might help you. see your local public library/interlibrary loan. state historical societies and state archives often have historical newspapers.

if your ancestor was alive 1/1/1937, they would have filed a delayed birth certificate from state vital records in order to show proof of age when they applied for social security. this might help you find the father of kate.

where did your people live 1900-1940. did they enroll in a nearby tribe. natives had to agree to live under the authority of the tribe, if they were accepted as members.

if you start a new thread, i will answer.

genealogists use names, dates, locations, children and spouses to match records. if you have a common surname, you need to give more information rather than less. if you post about women, it is helpful to include the maiden name and the married name and designate which one is the maiden name.

suzanne hamlet shatto

khembre khembre

posted on March 4

Suzanne, once again, thank you for always giving guidance on where to look next. I did match William A Jackson census to the land purchase … I’ll have figure out where to see/buy the land packet. He definitely originated in MS and then my research shows our descendants eventually migrated to Texas and Oklahoma.

My ultimate goal is to do what it takes for my husband and children to acquire CDIB. If all i learn along the way is our lineage then I will not have researched in vain. Anything I learn will be more than his family has ever known previously.

I will check out the new information you’ve sent and post if I have any further questions. Thank you, THANK YOU!

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on March 4

the land packet is available from NARA http://www.archives.gov

khembre khembre

posted on March 5

Thank you!

khembre khembre

posted on March 5

Will the Land packet, if it is our ancestor and it was land in lieu of tribal enrollment … will this help me in my quest for enrollment of our kids? If it won’t help; then there is no point in spending the $50 to order the land packet. Money is tight; I’ll order it if it will help but not if it won’t. Thanks!