Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

The Great Seal of the Choctaw Nation
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1892-93 federal contracts on sale of Indian children

Patrick Patrick

posted on July 20, 2013

Mennonite Church and Halstead Seminary had 15 Indian children from Oklahoma. In 1887 the Indian orphanage was moved to Krehbiel’s farm. Children lived on the farm with the Kriehbiels. Children studied academic subjects during the school year worked the farm in summer. For the 1892-93 school year Krehbiel contracted with the federal government to take 30 more Indian children for $125 each. After the government ended its contract policy for Indian children in 1896, Kriehbiels helped organized the Orphan and Children’s Aid Society and they started an orphanage on his farm, they continued the process and were adopting and contracting out these Indian children to neighboring farms of the Mennonite faith. Native American Mennonites?
Are there any documents, contracts, names of these kids? Researching oil paintings from 1921 and listed them as Mennonite paintings on eBay, but research is heading to orphaned Indians? Any records on these government sold kids?

Patrick Patrick

posted on July 20, 2013

photo 1896 orphanage industrial farm

attached:

suzanne hamlet shatto suzanne hamlet shatto

posted on July 20, 2013

since oklahoma became a state in 1907, you should probably research this at NARA, try the fort worth, TX office.

http://www.archives.gov

before oklahoma was a state, it’s name was indian territory and forts administered the territory. so the war department may have kept records and they would have been shipped to NARA.

suzanne hamlet shatto

Patrick Patrick

posted on July 23, 2013

Changed my listing to United States artist Myrtle Hege. Contacted NARA and no response. Something happened in 1896 when Myrtle was born that removed the parents from Mennonite membership. Seriously think she was a trained house servant purchased from that farm do to abuse. Same year Jacob left the church who had the “children for sale.” Researching this artist is impossible when everyone looks away in shame.